Ross's Maryland Bakery

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Chuckwagon
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Ross's Maryland Bakery

Post by Chuckwagon » Fri Mar 22, 2013 21:14

Howdy Sausage Makers!
We have, in our midst, an experienced member whose wisdom and suggestions are always welcome around my campfire! He has expertise in many areas, but if you have a question about wood (trees) or breads and baked items (sausage buns), then ssorllih is the man to see. That`s Ross Hill spelled backwards. Shucks, I just call him `rongway". :lol:

I don`t know about you, but if I eat a terrific home-made frankfurter, I must slap it on a terrific home-made bun! (Please... No desserts and pastries here as we are a sausage making site.) Tell us about your buns Ross! Take it away... `rongway! :mrgreen:

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Last edited by Chuckwagon on Fri Aug 09, 2013 06:17, edited 1 time in total.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Chuckwagon » Fri Mar 22, 2013 21:17

Hi Ross,
Over the years, I`ve discovered that if I make a "wet" dough, it makes a better texture. In a sausage bun, I like a little "tooth tug" in the texture. Any suggestions?

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by ssorllih » Fri Mar 22, 2013 21:38

Chuckwagon, Bread making is most reliable when done with bakers percentages. These are very much like sausage making percentages in that as you change them you change the result. Loaf bread generally uses 65% to 67% liquid to the total weight of the flour. This makes a good loaf in a pan and sliced it is good for sandwiches and toast. Salt is almost never more than 1.5% of the flour in any mix. You can use no shortening (fat) or as much as 5%. The more fat you use the more crumbly and tender the bread will be. Kneading will cause the dough to hold its shape better and dough as wet as 75% will make a low long loaf if it is kneaded enough to develop the gluten strands that hold the gases that make the bread rise. The best success I have had with making sausage buns has been when I roll the dough out quite thinly and then roll the thin sheet like a newspaper until it is about 3/4 inch thick pinch the edges together and set it to rise on a sheet pan. for that sort of work not much over 69% liquid.
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Post by NorCal Kid » Fri Mar 22, 2013 23:11

Thanks for the explanation of percentages, Ross.

Our biggest challenge in creating a variety of homemade breads is to do so without GLUTEN.
No shortage of available 'substitute' flours and starches to use, but the challenge is trying to mimic the chew or mouth-feel the gluten provides. Additional ingredients added can include guar and/or xanthan gums to bind, thicken & emulsify the ingredients. Without one or both of these ingredients, the bread becomes a dry, crumbly mess.

Kevin
Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever. — Hebrews 13:8
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Post by ssorllih » Sat Mar 23, 2013 00:44

Corn bread is a prime example of gluten free bread. Eggs help a lot.
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Post by Bubba » Sat Mar 23, 2013 12:56

Thank you Ross,
I have learnt something new from your posting and will try baking my own bread.
NorCal Kid wrote:Our biggest challenge in creating a variety of homemade breads is to do so without GLUTEN.
Kevin,
I always read your interesting posts on how your recipes are combined for good flavor and doing without the ingredients that are intolerant.
Some years back I toured one of Pepperidge Farms factories, and it was interesting to read how the company was started. All from a home kitchen where Mrs. Rudkin came up with a way to bake bread for her family without the intolerant ingredients. Pepperidge Farm history
Ron
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Post by redzed » Sat Mar 23, 2013 17:03

NorCal Kid wrote:Thanks for the explanation of percentages, Ross.

Our biggest challenge in creating a variety of homemade breads is to do so without GLUTEN.
No shortage of available 'substitute' flours and starches to use, but the challenge is trying to mimic the chew or mouth-feel the gluten provides. Additional ingredients added can include guar and/or xanthan gums to bind, thicken & emulsify the ingredients. Without one or both of these ingredients, the bread becomes a dry, crumbly mess.

Kevin
My wife has made some, what I would describe as "decent" gluten-free breads and is continually experimenting. The biggest problem is that these breads taste OK only when they are fresh. After one day the taste changes and they are dry and sometimes downright awful. Does help a lot by toasting. But no matter what, there is no real substitute for wheat when it comes to bread. I really like the Central-European rye (made with 75% wheat) breads and could eat it three times a day. But with the situation at home, most of the time we don't have bread of any kind around the house. Sometimes I go for weeks without eating any bread. But the positive side of all this is being able able to keep weight off, and today I don't weigh more than when I was 25.
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Post by ssorllih » Sat Mar 23, 2013 17:18

One of the simplist answers to a gluten free bread is in pancakes. They can be a combination of buckwheat, corn and oatmeal and made in small enough batches to be consumed in one day. Pancakes and muffins are quite similar in recipe the difference is primarily in the amount of liquid used. Most pancake recipes call for a substantial amount of fat but it isn't necessary. Everybody should try wrapping a breakfast sausage in a pancake for a portable sandwich.
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a handy baking mix

Post by ssorllih » Sun May 19, 2013 21:46

About three weeks ago I assembled a pancake mix to be used at our church spring festival.

It consisted of 2 parts all purpose white flour and one part buckwheat flour.
The buckwheat is a whole grain flour and could be replaced with any whole grain flour or with oatmeal or cornmeal.

I blended in 2 tablespoons of baking powder and rounded teaspoon of salt for each pound of total flour. The resulting mix is stored in tight sealing containers.

To make pancakes: 3 cups of mix, 2 eggs beaten and 2 cups of milk. combine and mix to a pourable batter.

For muffins; 3 cups of mix, 2 tablespoons for sugar, ½ melted fat, 2 eggs and about 1½ cups of milk. add raisins, nuts or berries and bake in a muffin tin. Bake at about 375°F for about 25 minutes

For biscuits: 2 cups of mix, ½cup of cold fat rubbed into the flour add ¾cup of milk mix to combine. turn out onto a floured surface pat flat into a disk shape, fold and flatten again to about ¾inch thick cut into rounds and bake at 425°F for about 20 minutes.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sun May 19, 2013 23:14

Photos! Photos! :mrgreen:
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by ssorllih » Sun May 19, 2013 23:46

you want a picture of a biscuit? :shock:
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sun May 19, 2013 23:51

Naw! I'd like to see Nancy cookin' up some pancakes! :wink:
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Folding biscuit dough to made layers

Post by ssorllih » Mon May 20, 2013 00:39

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I had to do something with some leftover roast chicken.

Post by ssorllih » Tue May 21, 2013 22:40

Image
So I made a pie crust and lined a 10 inch pie plate. Cut uphalf of a chicken an onion and a good handful of mushrooms. The mushrooms and onion I sauted in some of the dripping, salted and peppered and filled the pie crust. Next I beat 4 eggs and added a pint of milk and a tablespoonful of corn starch mixed with a little water. This helps to trap some of the excess liquid in the finished pie. I topped this with slices of pepperjack cheese and asparagas and baked it is a preheated 425° oven for 15 minutes and reduced the heat to 350° for a half hour until a cold knife dipped in the center came out clean. This also works well with fish or pork.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Wed May 22, 2013 05:15

Maaaa Maaaa :razz:
That looks so good I could lick the computer screen. :wink:
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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