JBK's "Pierogi Makers" Corner

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DelNorte
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Post by DelNorte » Sun Jan 19, 2014 21:46

ssorllih and Krakowska thanks a lot for all of this info!

I checked out the cottage cheese making link ssorlih, but it has two down falls for me: Rennet and culture. I haven't found that here yet and at this moment I'm exhausted looking for things. Maybe I'll try finding it at a later time.

The recipe for the farmer's cheese is perfect though Krakowska! I can easily make this one and will be trying it out.. funny, I discovered just before Christmas how to make a fake sour cream. Yep, you got it. Another thing that does not exist here. Things that are everyday for us back in the States just aren't here... anyway, I bought a bag of crema (basically cream) and kept adding lemon juice and whisking until it tasted like sour cream. Then threw in salt to taste and let it sit for a couple of days in the fridge to firm up. It tuned out so well that some Mormon Missionary kids at a party asked where I found sour cream. So now I'm the :cool: kid on the block, with them asking me to make them soure cream periodically. :lol:
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Post by jbk101 » Sun Jan 19, 2014 22:51

Hey Guys Here is a Link to where I get my Farmers Cheese, I have Purchased it a Meijer's in the past but found it was easier just to order it from the source.
http://www.andrulischeese.com/
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Post by jbk101 » Tue Jan 21, 2014 01:09

Just happen to be on my Facebook Page today and Barb Rolex from About.com Eastern European Food forum posted the Her Link and Instruction for making Homemade Farmers Cheese just had to share :smile: http://easteuropeanfood.about.com/od/ch ... Cheese.htm

Hope it helps the folks that do not have Access to purchase this type of Cheese, I know that I'll be trying it very soon.
John
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Post by Dave Zac » Wed Jan 22, 2014 02:05

jbk101 wrote:Hey Guys Here is a Link to where I get my Farmers Cheese, I have Purchased it a Meijer's in the past but found it was easier just to order it from the source.
http://www.andrulischeese.com/
My grandma and mom taught me to use this harder style farmers cheese. I can't make a pierogi now (or eat one) with a curd style cheese. You can tell the difference :)
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Post by ssorllih » Wed Jan 22, 2014 06:22

I have purchased farmer's cheese in Amish shops that had been aged and was made into rather large substantial wheels from which they would cut a wedge. Very different from the fresh cottage cheese that mother used to make that was more just a dry unpressed curd.
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Post by Rick » Wed Jan 22, 2014 17:15

jbk, thanks for the Andrulis Farmers Cheese tip. They're 100 miles NW of me, so shipping shouldn't be so bad. I'll certainly give em a try.
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Post by DelNorte » Wed Jan 22, 2014 20:20

Thanks much for the tutorial link John. I like when pictures are included so one is not left wondering anything. I'm looking forward to trying my hand out at making farmer's cheese for pierogis!
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Post by jbk101 » Fri Jan 31, 2014 02:55

Well Folks Here is my Mom's Recipe for Pierogi's :smile: In a MS Word format it is 5 pages long. If anyone would like the word version I would be more than happy to e-mail it to you. Just send me a message on this site and include your e-mail address and I will send you the Word version. That way you can print it out etc. I know its lengthy but they way I did it was to address it from a way that a novice could make them and included some tricks of the trade and how Mom taught me. The only difference was when Mom taught me it was a handful of this a pinch of this etc. So to make it work for me I had to slow her down and measure the ingredients etc.

Pierogi - Mom`s Polish Recipe
In memory of Maria Kieltyk (Mom) Recipe Compiled by John Kieltyk

Dough Ingredients
● 4-1/2 Pounds Flour (un-sifted)
● 1 Large Egg (Yolk Only
● 1 Quart Luke Warm Water (4 Cups approx.)
Directions
1. Place Flour into a Large Bowl - making a well in the center
2. Add the Egg Yolk and Salt
3. Add Water Slowly until all ingredients are combined thoroughly - Depending on the temperature and Humidity slightly more/less water may be needed.
4. Place Dough onto a lightly floured surface and Knead until Firm but not overly sticky.
Note: Dough mixture can be made in advance (one day). Store it in air tight container or wrap dough ball in Plastic Wrap (I do both) and Refrigerate until ready to use. This Dough Recipe will make Approximately 80 Pierogi`s
Fillings
Sauerkraut - Sauerkraut with Meat - Kielbasa (Polish Sausage) with Sauerkraut - Potato with Cheese - Farmers Cheese (Baltic Style Farmers Cheese is Best) - Mushroom - Apple - Cherry and Strawberry are mainly used as traditional Pierogi fillings. Others may be used your choice.

Sauerkraut Filling Ingredients (Individual Batch method)
● 1 Jar Sauerkraut (Approximately 2 lbs.)
● 1/2 Cup Onion (Finely Chopped)
● 1 Medium Sized Carrot (Finely Chopped)
● 3 to 4 Bay Leaves
● 3 Tablespoons Unsalted Butter
● 1/8 Teaspoon Salt (to taste)
● 1/8 teaspoon Fresh Ground Black Pepper (to taste)
Directions
1. Drain Sauerkraut of liquid, Rinse and Squeeze out excess water from the Raw Sauerkraut.
(The more you Rinse with fresh cold water the Mellower {less Sour flavor} the Sauerkraut will have)
2. Rough Chop the Sauerkraut so all the Pieces are about a ¼ inch in size.
3. In a Large Skillet add 1 Tablespoon of the Butter along with the Onions and Sauté until lightly browned.
4. Add the Sauerkraut, Bay Leaves, Carrots and Salt and Pepper along with the remaining Butter.
5. Reduce Heat to a simmer and Cook mixture uncovered turning often, as not to burn the Sauerkraut.
6. Cook the Sauerkraut thoroughly on low heat for about 20 minutes.
7. After Sauerkraut is cooked remove the Bay Leaves and Allow mixture to cool completely before using.
The Filling is best cooled completely and can be made a day or two in advance. Store in an air tight container and refrigerated.
This is the Basic method to make any of the Sauerkraut type Pierogi fillings aka - Sauerkraut - Sauerkraut and Meat (hamburger) - Sauerkraut with Kielbasa (Smoked Sausage) - Sauerkraut with Mushroom

If you what to make Pierogi with multiple Sauerkraut Fillings (which I normally do) you can make larger quantities of the Basic Sauerkraut filling using a Roasting Pan and cooking it in the Oven instead of on the Stove Top as Follows, and separate and mix in the various other ingredients after initially cooking the Larger Batch of Sauerkraut.

Making the Sauerkraut using Roasting Pan Oven Method (Large Batch)
1. Drain and Chop the amount of Sauerkraut that you want to prepare (example 6 jars), also do the same with the other ingredients (Onion, carrots, Bay Leaves, Salt and Pepper, and Butter) for the larger amount that you plan on preparing.
2. Sauté the Onions in a Skillet and Transfer into your roasting pan and mix in the remaining ingredients - Sauerkraut, Carrots, Bay Leaves, Salt and Pepper, and Butter.
3. Mix to combine
4. Cover the roasting pan and place into a preheated oven at 325 degrees Fahrenheit
5. Stir about every 10 minutes to prevent burning and Cook the Sauerkraut in the Oven for about 1 hour.

After Cooking the Sauerkraut allow to Cool and separate into Batches for the various types of fillings that you are making.

The Following are the ways to prepare the various types of fillings using Cooked Sauerkraut.

Sauerkraut with Meat (Ground Beef)
Ingredients
● 1/2 Pound Lean Ground Round or Ground Chuck
● 1/8 cup Onion Chopped Finely
● 1 tablespoon Butter (Unsalted is Best - you can use salted Butter - Just eliminate adding any additional Salt)
● Salt To Taste
● Pepper To Taste
● Garlic 1 clove minced (This is optional) traditionally mom would not use garlic but I like a little for flavor.
● 1 Jar Sauerkraut (Drained, Squeezed of excess moisture and chopped)
Directions
1. Sauté the chopped Onion and (Garlic if Using-Optional) slightly in a medium size skillet
2. Break up the Hamburger (Ground Beef) in small pieces and brown completely. (The smaller the pieces end up the better)
3. Drain off the Excess Fat from the hamburger.
4. Mix the Cooked Ground Beef mixture with the Sauerkraut into medium bowl that has a lid and place into the refrigerator and allow to cool completely.

This amount of the Hamburger Mixture is made to be mixed with approximately 1 jar of Cooked Sauerkraut
If just making the Sauerkraut with Meat mixture (Individual Batch Method) after draining the fat add the Sauerkraut and cook per the Sauerkraut Filling Individual Batch Method.

Sauerkraut with Kielbasa (Smoked Sausage)
Ingredients
● 1 Ring Approximately 1/2 to 3/4 pound of Kielbasa (Casing removed and Chopped) Smoked Sausage is Best
● 1/8 cup Onion Chopped Finely
● Salt To Taste
● Pepper To Taste
● 1 Jar Sauerkraut (Drained, Squeezed of excess moisture and chopped)
Directions
1. Sauté the chopped Onion and slightly in a medium size skillet
2. Add the Kielbasa and cook enough to render the fat out of the Sausage (The smaller the pieces end up the better)
3. Drain off the Excess Fat from the Kielbasa
4. Mix the Cooked Kielbasa mixture with the Sauerkraut into medium bowl that has a lid and place into the refrigerator and allow to cool completely.

This amount of the Kielbasa Mixture is made to be mixed with approximately 1 jar of Cooked Sauerkraut
If just making the Sauerkraut with Kielbasa mixture (Individual Batch Method) after draining the fat add the Sauerkraut and cook per the Sauerkraut Filling Individual Batch Method.

Sauerkraut with Mushroom
Ingredients
● 1/4 pound Fresh Mushroom (whatever is your personal preference) Mine is a Polish Mushroom called Podgrzybek Brunatny {you can purchase a dried version and reconstitute them with some water}
● 1/8 cup Onion Chopped Finely
● Salt To Taste
● Pepper To Taste
● 2 Tablespoon Unsalted Butter
● 1 Jar Sauerkraut (Drained, Squeezed of excess moisture and chopped)
Directions
1. Rinse and chop the mushrooms (I like them chopped finely as it mixes more thoroughly with the Sauerkraut)
2. Sauté the chopped Onion slightly with 1 tablespoon of Butter in a medium size skillet
3. Add the Chopped Mushrooms along with the remaining Butter stirring to combine with the onions
4. Salt and Pepper to Taste
5. Cook Mushrooms until they thoroughly cooked and volume is reduced (about 10 to 20 minutes)
6. Mix the Cooked Mushroom mixture with the Sauerkraut into medium bowl that has a lid and place into the refrigerator and allow to cool completely.

This amount of the Mushroom Mixture is made to be mixed with approximately 1 jar of Cooked Sauerkraut
If just making the Sauerkraut with Mushroom mixture (Individual Batch Method) after Cooking the Mushrooms add the Sauerkraut and cook per the Sauerkraut Filling Individual Batch Method.

Potato and Cheese Filling
Ingredients
● 8 to 10 Potatoes
● 1/2 Cup Cheddar Cheese (Shredded)
● 1/8 teaspoon Salt (to taste)
● 1/8 teaspoon Ground Black Pepper (to taste)
● 2 Tablespoons Half and Half Cream (Coffee Cream may be substituted)
● 1/4 to 1/2 cup Onions (chopped finely) (Amount is based on your preference of how much onion flavor you want.)
● 3 Tablespoons Butter (Unsalted)
Directions
1. Peel and cut the Potatoes into Cubes
2. Place Potatoes into a large pot filled with water and cook until they are fork tender
3. In a skillet sauté the onions in 1 tablespoon of the butter and set aside
4. Drain the water from the Potatoes and Mash the potatoes
5. Add the Cheddar Cheese, Cooked Onions, Salt, Pepper, Half & Half Cream, and remaining Butter to the mashed potatoes
6. Mix all the ingredients thoroughly ensuring that the cheese is melted and completely incorporated into the mixture
7. Allow the mixture to cool completely before using as a Pierogi filling
Potato and Cheese filling should be firm to allow the mixture to be spooned into the Pierogi Dough without being running.
This can also be made a day in advance. Store in a covered air tight container and refrigerate till ready to use.

Cheese Filling
Ingredients
● 1/2 pound Farmers Cheese (I recommend Andrulis Plain Farmers Cheese)
● 1 Large Egg (Yolk only)
● 2 Tablespoons Sugar
● 1/8 teaspoon Salt
● 2 Tablespoons Half & Half Cream (Coffee Cream may be Substituted)

Directions
1. In a large bowl Crumble the Farmers cheese into small pieces
2. Add Egg Yolk, Sugar, salt and Half & Half Cream
3. Mix all the ingredients thoroughly (Use a fork to mix)
(Do not use a mixer you want to incorporate all the ingredients without making it creamy - you want it to still be crumbly.)
4. Refrigerate in a covered bowl until ready to use

Mushroom Filling
Ingredients
● 1/2 pound Fresh Mushroom (whatever is your personal preference) Mine is a Polish Mushroom called Podgrzybek Brunatny {you can purchase a dried version and reconstitute them with some water}
● 1/2 cup Onion Chopped Finely
● Salt To Taste
● Pepper To Taste
● 4 Tablespoon Unsalted Butter
Directions
1. Rinse and chop the mushrooms
2. Sauté the chopped Onion slightly with 1 tablespoon of Butter in a medium size skillet
3. Add the Chopped Mushrooms along with the remaining Butter stirring to combine with the onions
4. Salt and Pepper to Taste
5. Cook Mushrooms until they thoroughly cooked and volume is reduced (about 10 to 20 minutes)
6. Let the mixture cool completely before using as a Pierogi Filling.

Apple Filling
Ingredients
● 2 Large Apples (Chopped Finely)
● 4 Tablespoons Sugar
Directions
1. Peel and Core the Apples
2. Chop into a very fine (small) Dice
3. Mix the chopped apples with the sugar thoroughly
This is one filling that you do not want to make in advance. Have your dough ready to go, prepare the filling and use it immediately. You also need to keep the liquids to a minimum as an excessive amount will give you problems with sealing the dough and keeping the dough sealed during the cooking process.

Also this is a basic recipe for any type of fruit filling that you might be interested to make.
As an example 1/2 cup of pitted Cherries to 4 tablespoons of Sugar (or whatever fruit you want to use)
Other types are as follows; Cherry - Blueberry - Strawberry - Plum - Pear - Raspberry

Assembling the Pierogi
1. Pull off a small piece of the Dough and roll out into a sheet that`s about a thickness of between 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch in thickness, you will reroll it just before filling.
2. Use a 3 inch diameter round cookie cutter and cut as many from the rolled out sheet. Remove the excess dough and ball back up to re use.
(I have used a can - cleaned and sterilized of course a large plastic glass and even a coffee cup just about anything that will cut through the dough that gives you a nice uniform circle will work.)
3. Place the cut out dough onto a lint free towel or a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.
4. Take the individual dough circles and slightly reroll them to make them a little large and the dough is a uniform 1/8 inch thickness
5. Place approximately 1 Tablespoon of your desired filling into the center of the dough circle
6. Fold the dough in half over the filling and pinch the ends closed to seal the ingredients
(A tip is to pinch the center and work downward till you reach the bottom, and then do the same on the other side)
You may have to do this a couple of times to ensure a good seal
7. Repeat the process till all the cut out dough is used up.
8. Once you seal the edges you can take a fork and re-crimp around the edges (just do the flattened out edges making sure that you do not puncture past the edges into the filling area)
(My wife likes to do this part she says they look better and reduces blowouts)
Additional notes:
a. Have a large stock pot filled with Hot Water ready to go and boil them in small batches
b. After a few trial and errors you will figure out how much filling and the crimping technique that will serve you best
c. You can practice crimping the dough between your thumb and forefinger without any filling (just to get the feel for the dough -that way you won`t waste any of the filling till you a comfortable)
d. The dough can be kneaded back into the ball and reused till it`s all used up, I usually just take the scraps mix it with some additional dough, knead it to combine and reroll into a sheet.
e. Pierogi dough is very forgiving

Initial Cooking (boiling)
1. Fill a Large stock pot with water and bring to a boil
2. Drop the Pierogi carefully into the boiling water (for the most part they will sink to the bottom - Don`t panic if they don`t)
3. Cook the Pierogi till they float, approximately 3 to 4 minutes (Tip - Give the water a stir to prevent them from sticking to the bottom of the pot)
4. Remove them from the water with a slotted spoon and place into a colander and allow to drain.
5. Run cold water over them and allow to drain off the excess moisture
6. Rub some butter over the Pierogi`s and place them on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper or waxed paper in a single layer.
7. Place Pierogi filled cookie sheets into the Freezer and flash freeze them for about an hour or two.
(This prevents them from sticking together when you package them)
8. After they have harden (frozen) enough you want to repack them in either Zip Lock Freezer bags or with your Vacuum Sealer (my preferred method) don`t forget to Label them with the type of Pierogi you are placing into the bag.
9. I recommend that you package them in quantities that you would normally what to cook for a meal

Cooking them for a meal (Second Cooking)
1. Place the desired amount of Pierogi`s into a skillet with approximately two tablespoons of butter.
2. Cook on a low heat, turning them often until the Pierogi`s turn slightly browned.
(Pierogi`s may but cooked right from a frozen state or allow them to thaw first)
3. When cooking from a frozen state cook them on the lowest possible temperature to allow the filling to heat thoroughly about 10 minutes. You can raise the temperature the last couple of minutes to brown them a little more.
4. Another traditional way to cook them is sauté some onion along with the Pierogi`s - This is best done with the non-desert type of Pierogi`s - Sauerkraut filled (all types) the Potato with Cheese and the plain Mushroom filled ones. But not the Farmers Cheese or fruit filled Pierogi`s.
5. The non-Desert types are also traditionally served with a Dollop of Sour Cream.
6. The Dessert types of Pierogi`s are traditionally just served just as they are.

My family always wants both the Non-Desert Types and a couple of the Desert types cooked and served together to make a quick and complete meal. I will also be the first to admit that initially they are a lot of work to make but when you`re done and they are frozen they will last up to six months or more if frozen properly. And only taking about ten minutes to cook rite from the freezer you can`t ask for better meal.

I hope you enjoy making these,
John
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Post by redzed » Fri Jan 31, 2014 03:40

Just a note here on John's "Polish" mushroom Podgrzybek Brunatny is the Boletus Badius, known in North America as the Bay Bolete. It grows in Eastern Canada and the Northeastern US. It does not grow in the Pacific Northwest, but each year I find a good number of Boletus Zellerei or Zeller's Boletus, which in appearance and taste is very close to John's mushroom. I only dry these and have used them with sauerkraut in pierogi, probably my favourite!
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Post by Chuckwagon » Fri Jan 31, 2014 05:34

Yikes John! I don't know which one to try first. But you can bet one of them will be for supper tonight! :wink:
Thanks for posting the recipes pal.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by jbk101 » Fri Jan 31, 2014 06:19

Zedzed - You are correct that it is the Boletus Badius or Bay Bolete. Growing up Dad used to take us mushroom hunting in Michigan and when we found them he would call them by the Polish name so that's what stuck. A lot of the Cultural Polish stores would sell the dried version that were imported from Poland and since then I've simply ordered them on-line!

Dad did teach us a lot about mushroom hunting but I'm still cautious about fresh wild picked mushrooms - Just don't trust myself with the exceptions of hunting Morels in the spring (which are great in a Pierogi :smile:)

Chuckwagon - take your pick - My Favorites has always been the Sauerkraut with Meat and the Sauerkraut with Kielbasa and I'm sure a sausage hound like you has a few links of Kielbasa laying around :grin:

Although when I make them I usually make them all - I am serious when I said it's usually a 3 day Pierogi marathon - Day 1 - Make all the fillings, Day 2 & 3 Make the Dough and Fill the Pierogi's - But I give a lot to the Kids, They also have their favorites :lol: so I get what's left over :wink:
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Post by DelNorte » Fri Jan 31, 2014 12:33

jbk101 - Gracias por la recetas! The effort is much appreciated that it took for you to share.

"3 day Pierogi marathon" ??? - Ok, I know you said you give a lot to the Kids, but you still must have a couple of big freezers in your place... a lot of work, but so well worth it.

I have fond memories of going "inkies" hunting with my dad. He always made great mushroom soup... And then there's the one time he fried a big cast iron skillet full of mushrooms in butter, and me, my brother, and dad all got nitrogen poisoning. Dad thought my brother and I were faking being sick, because we were hauling firewood that day and didn't really want to. I guess later he believed us when mom was cooking supper and he proceeded to retch his guts out while waiting in the living room. Mom went into a panic when she found out we all ate mushrooms and she insisted we go to the hospital. Drinking charcoal is not one of my favorite past times, or it coming out of the system on the other end. I can't believe I got over the nauseous feeling every time I looked at mushrooms, and once again as an adult I love them. Go figure.
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Post by jbk101 » Fri Jan 31, 2014 16:15

Delnorte - Your welcome and I'm Glad to Share - I do have 3 kids all grown and 1 grandchild (she's 1-1/2) and just learn to love them according to my Daughter :lol: And yes I have a couple of freezers and they are full after a Pierogi session, but not for long, Whenever we go visit the kids we always take them another "Care Package" of their Favorites :cool:. They actually are disappointed if we don't :grin:.

I used to love going out mushroom hunting in the woods of Michigan with Dad, Mom and my three sisters, as a kid it always was a family affair followed by a picnic (almost every Sunday in the fall) Dad always made the final decision of what made it into the bag and I never remember getting sick. His favorite was also a big batch of fresh mushrooms sauté' in butter, I remember mom cooking them up putting a pot holder on the table and putting that skillet in front of him and dad eating it right out of the skillet. :smile:. She also made a couple types of Mushroom soup (creamed and not creamed)

Remember if anyone wants the Microsoft Word version just send me a message and I'll make sure to e-mail it to you. Now that I have it back on my Computer it could also be changed to a PDF or other format also just let ne know. :smile:
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Post by DelNorte » Fri Jan 31, 2014 16:37

jbk101 - "Care Packages" are a wonderful tradition handed down from generation after generation. Who enjoys it the most? Receiver or giver? :wink:

Just a note to everyone who does not know this tidbit - people can get nitrogen poisoning from all safe mushrooms. It's comes about from eating way too many of those yummy buggers. Your body naturally kicks in when it gets too much nitrogen with a good retching. I'm not sure how necessary after that point that it is to drink the carbon shake at the hospital to absorb what's left in the system. Still no fun all around. So the next time you are tempted to gorge yourselves on butter sauted mushrooms, mmm mmm. I wouldn't advise.
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Post by jbk101 » Fri Jan 31, 2014 17:30

DelNorte wrote:"Care Packages" are a wonderful tradition handed down from generation after generation. Who enjoys it the most? Receiver or giver?
To answer that it depends on who you ask the Giver or the Receiver :???: I know I enjoy the giving to the receiver :smile: that's why I enjoy it and why I do it!
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