Books on German sausage formulations?

toolmann
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Post by toolmann » Thu Jan 12, 2012 17:25

vagreys wrote:
toolmann wrote:...i have , but they are in german , will that be ok ???
siggi
Certainly! Between you and Bubba and some of my food historian friends who work with German, I'm sure I can get any help I need with what I can't translate for myself.
do you still want some info on german book ??? it is expensive , about175-200$ , but i can give you any recepie that you need out off my book , and you dont need to buy it then !!!

regards siggi
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Post by vagreys » Tue Jan 31, 2012 23:12

Sure, Siggi! Part of my interest is in learning what all is out there. When I see German sausage recipes listed in English sources, it is usually limited to the usual bratwurst, pork/beef or all-beef frankfurter, weiner, bockwurst, weisswurst, etc., but there is so much more out there. Rarely do you see something like pinkelwurst mentioned, or any of many, many other styles from the different regions of Germany.

Americanized versions of German sausages often call for beef, when the authentic German sausage may have originally been all pork (like the frankfurter). I am allergic to beef and sensitive to cow dairy, but can substitute goat milk where milk is called for. I can't do beef, at all, but can substitute bison if I wish. So, I am particularly interested in German sausages that do not contain beef. Pork is most common, I'm sure, but I'd also be interested in poultry and game sausages.

So, primarily, pork, poultry and game sausages that are not the typical, Americanized German sausages we see in the US. Shall we start with all-pork frankfurter wurst? I'm curious what differences in meat class and spices there might be. I suggest we start a new discussion in the appropriate forum, from here, since this is supposed to be about books.
- tom

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Post by ssorllih » Tue Jan 31, 2012 23:34

Tom, This may be a goos place to start looking. I haven't yet taken the time to read the entire story but it is worth a look. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-cult ... c=y&page=1
Ross- tightwad home cook
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Post by vagreys » Wed Feb 01, 2012 00:27

ssorllih wrote:Tom, This may be a goos place to start looking. I haven't yet taken the time to read the entire story but it is worth a look. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-cult ... c=y&page=1
Wow, Ross. That was sad, but at the same time, tantilizing. I lament the loss of the butcher shops and the butcher's craft, and I feel an increasing desire to preserve and even re-establish that knowledge. I had no idea that the German tradition was being lost so quickly and so thoroughly. So much to lose.
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Post by ssorllih » Wed Feb 01, 2012 02:06

Tom , I think that this is the same thing that our hosts and the Marianskis have been seeing in Poland. It is time to preserve it or loose it forever. We had an emigrant German butcher here in Bel Air for many years and when he retired his son in law tried to continue but he didn't have the knowledge and the economy also was changing. We still have one bakery in town but Jim is at least my age so that may close soon also.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu Oct 11, 2012 03:52

Topic Split 10.10.12@20:49 by CW. See new topic in "For Beginners" forum under topic: A Small Shop In Today's Economy. Click on this link: http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.php?t=6086
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by vagreys » Sun Feb 17, 2013 02:37

Thought you might like to know I was able to locate and obtain a 4th edition copy of Die Fabrikation feiner Fleische- und Wurstwaren. This book is still in print, in its 22nd edition, and is very comprehensive, with many regional variations on the entire range of German cured meat products and sausages. My 4th edition copy dates to, or pre-dates World War I, and includes an entire chapter on kosher versions of many sausages and small goods. The current edition probably contains twice as many recipes and variations, but my early edition is exciting in its old-school perspective and approach. I was able to trace the provenance of my copy to a butcher and charcutiere in Obenai, Alsace (Germany), who emigrated to avoid conscription into the German army in WWI. His family story is interesting in itself, and the knowledge that this was a working volume in a shop, when it was new, is nice.

If you are interested in German cured meats and sausage, it would be well worth looking up on Amazon and perusing the table of contents, which is shown in its entirety. Thanks, again, for all your suggestions and advice.
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Sun Feb 17, 2013 17:27

Would love to have that book and be able to read it. But the €150 ($200) price and the fact that my Deutsch is limited to being able to order a large schnitzel and two beers, does not look like like an upcoming project to me.

How about translating some of the more interesting recipes and posting them here? They are in fact doing that on the Polish site of WD from a German book published in 1970, Ludwig Scheid: Die Rohwurst.
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Post by vagreys » Fri Mar 08, 2013 11:13

redzed wrote:Would love to have that book and be able to read it. But the €150 ($200) price and the fact that my Deutsch is limited to being able to order a large schnitzel and two beers, does not look like like an upcoming project to me.

How about translating some of the more interesting recipes and posting them here? They are in fact doing that on the Polish site of WD from a German book published in 1970, Ludwig Scheid: Die Rohwurst.
I intend to do just that. A friend of mine is a conservator librarian, and has stabilized and repaired the spine and leather cover. This will be one among my various projects!
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Sat Jan 10, 2015 18:02

Tom
Did you get any of the translations for recipes from the book Die Fabrikation feiner Fleische- und Wurstwaren. Translated and posted anywhere ?

Thanks
Bob
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