Question for Stanley Marianski (or Anyone Else That Knows)

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Oxide
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Question for Stanley Marianski (or Anyone Else That Knows)

Post by Oxide » Fri Mar 02, 2012 17:42

I just picked up the book 'Home Production of Quality Meats & Sausages' ... been reading it non-stop. I'm already up to page 8. :mrgreen:

At the bottom of the page 8 there are the ratios for stuff used in emulsions.

"... 5 parts water, 5 parts fat, 1 part soya isolate."

I think of water as measured by volume, fat as measured by weight, and powder can go either way.

So, are those "5 parts water, 5 parts fat, 1 part soya isolate" by weight or by volume? :?:

Sorry if the answer is obvious to everyone except me. It just happens sometimes. :grin:
Last edited by Oxide on Sat Aug 03, 2013 07:28, edited 1 time in total.
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story28
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Post by story28 » Fri Mar 02, 2012 18:07

Don't be bashful to ask a question like that. Everyone is nice around here.

Anyways, when you read a ratio, in most cases it refers to weight. Different substances have different densities and accounting for that is very difficult to equate for using a volume measurement relative to ratios.

Sometimes you read recipes that do ratio by volume, but it is not the most accurate way of cooking. Packed brown sugar... how packed? Packed by a 90 year old grandma, or packed by Hulk Hogan? See where the incongruousness can hide?

The best recipes are always by weight, especially when they use the metric system because it is more exacting.

That is a great book, by the way. I have read it twice over. Make sure you keep a highlighter handy!
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Post by ssorllih » Fri Mar 02, 2012 21:01

With water a fluid ounce and an ounce by weight are equal. Not so with buckshot.
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Oxide
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Post by Oxide » Sat Mar 03, 2012 16:31

story28 wrote:
Anyways, when you read a ratio, in most cases it refers to weight.

Sometimes you read recipes that do ratio by volume, but it is not the most accurate way of cooking.

I completely agree with you about weighing as opposed to measuring by volume. In my kitchen everything is done with metric scales ... except martinis, but I'm working on that. :grin:

If the book clearly targeted a professional audience I would presume the ratio to be by weight. The book's title 'Home Production of ...' suggestion otherwise. Unlike elsewhere in the world, the norm in America kitchens is to measure by volume.

Because the book targets kitchens in American homes I would presume the ration is by volume.

I am not sure what the author intends so I think I'm going to have to leave this query as unresolved.
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story28
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Post by story28 » Sat Mar 03, 2012 16:49

In the words of Reading Rainbow host LeVar Burton "You don't have to take my word for it." :smile: , but I can guarantee you that Mr. Marianski is referring to weight rather than volume.

I see your point about the book being titled with the word "Home", but you will notice that that does not keep Mr. Marianski from using the metric system coupled with US conversion for every single one of his recipes within this... "volume" :wink: . There is no recipe of a meat product in that book that is scaled by volume measurements.

You could try an experiment. Try the recipe once by volume and then weigh out the ingredients. Then, try the recipe again sourcing the ingredients from different places and repeat the process of checking the weight of your volumes.

A faster way to see where these difference lie would be to measure 1 cup of Morton's kosher salt and then measure 1 cup of Diamond Crystal salt. The differences in weight are definitely worth noting.
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Post by ssorllih » Sat Mar 03, 2012 21:19

A table of weights and measures for almost all things food: http://extension.missouri.edu/p/G4020
Notice that the weight per bushel of grain depends upon the moisture content.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sun Mar 04, 2012 01:37

Oxide, you wrote:
I am not sure what the author intends so I think I'm going to have to leave this query as unresolved.
Let's give Stan a chance to answer. He is one very busy individual. Not to mention one of the most unselfish people I've ever known. Right now he has several irons in the fire but I'm sure he'll be able to answer soon. I'll give him a shout. Have a little patience.

Best Wishes,
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Post by Seminole » Sun Mar 04, 2012 03:11

Hi Oxide,
I weigh everything on a little CD digital scale like the one that so popular with drug dealers. It is inexpensive and highly accurate, up to 0.01g.

This emulsion combination is a great stuff, though I prefer 1:4:5 better:
10 g soy protein isolate, 40 g vegetable oil, 50 g water.

1. Mix in a food processor soy isolate with water until a shiny paste is obtained. This takes about a minute.
2. Add vegetable oil and cut at high speed until a stable emulsion is obtained. About 2 minutes.
It is very white, a kind of mayonnaise, but no cholesterol. It can be used as a fat replacer as it contains 5 parts of water (less calories). It binds with meat very well. Keeps well in refrigerator up to 7 days. I will try to post photos on our web site, in meantime you can see how it looks at:
http://bookmagic.com/books/making-healt ... /chapter-8
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Post by Seminole » Sun Mar 04, 2012 03:24

I am also surprised at the suggestions that the book uses volumes instead of weights.

There are 172 recipes and ALL of them list ingredients in grams.

Then, in the right column, there is the US equivalent measure which is listed in pounds, cups, teaspoons, Tablespoons, ounces, quarts, pints and whatever else that we have invented here.

A completely revised and enlarged edition of the book will be available in about 3-4 weeks.
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Post by Oxide » Sun Mar 04, 2012 04:04

Chuckwagon wrote:

Let's give Stan a chance to answer. He is one very busy individual. Not to mention one of the most unselfish people I've ever known. Right now he has several irons in the fire but I'm sure he'll be able to answer soon. I'll give him a shout. Have a little patience.
No hurry ... but I'm not waiting at page 8, I'm gonna keep readin' the book. :grin:


For the folks that mentioned/reference the recipes in the book -- I have not looked at them, yet. I didn't buy the book for the recipes, tho I am sure I'll likely try some of them. I am really interested in the technical/science kinda stuff and I kept reading here how good this book is, so I got it, and I'm very glad I did.
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