Online Workshop: Project B (August 2012)

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sawhorseray
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Post by sawhorseray » Sat Oct 13, 2012 07:38

ssorllih wrote:Ray you bypassed a chance to make some blood sausage. :shock: :shock:
At least it would be with some blood that I was familiar with, I don't know that I'd feel all that confident with blood I'd no idea of it's history. Things turned out great after a eleven hour smoke! Daddy and I had the test-patty for dinner and were really impressed, this isn't sissy sausage by any stretch of the imagination, loads of garlic with a little heat. A couple of days to heal while the injected pork loins are curing in the fridge, Monday morning will be back to making some Canadian bacon. Then I'll get to play with my new commercial-grade meat slicer from Cabelas! My wife isn't quite as excited as I am about the prospect of playing with a rotating 1/3hp razor blade, but that's just the way some gals are. RAY.

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PS: My quote in the ER was a big hit with my wife. "s-!t happens, what, you never cut you finger before? 32 years in the carpenters union you can bet this isn't the first time my hand's been stitched up, this ain't exactly my first rodeo". After that I thought it might be better if I just shut up.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sat Oct 13, 2012 07:45

That's some great lookin' sausage Ray.
I'll bet your thumb is doing a little throbbing right about now.

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If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by sawhorseray » Sat Oct 13, 2012 07:51

For me, it often works if I use a wider diameter stick, or even double up, or you can use wooden toothpicks stuck to the bottom part of the touching sausages. You get a small pinhole in each but the sausage smokes nice and even. Don't forget to move the sausage around during the smoking process.[/quote]

Thanks for that, I'll give that a shot on my next effort. I like the idea of a small hole that'll heat itself as opposed to bending the upper third of a sausage. Proper presentation counts, tho not quite as much as what the final product tastes like dipped in a little mustard. I like to send pics of my culinary efforts to my sisters, make's them wanna throw rocks at their husbands. Never really liked either one of those guys. RAY
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Post by sawhorseray » Sat Oct 13, 2012 07:58

Chuckwagon wrote:
That's some great lookin' sausage Ray.
I'll bet your thumb is doing a little throbbing right about now.
Thanks CW, I'm real happy with what I managed to produce on this effort.
Thumbs OK, the doc who stitched prescribed some antibiotics, Dr. Ray prescribed some Mr Beefeaters. How bout them Giants!
Last edited by sawhorseray on Thu Oct 25, 2012 23:23, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by redzed » Sat Oct 13, 2012 22:47

I don't know my peppers. We don't have the luxury of Mexican markets here, but this is what I was able to find at a supermarket, Jalapenos, some just labelled "red and yellow hot peppers", and the orange ones labelled "passilla". Now when I searched passilla peppers on the internet, they don't look like that. Could they be the hot hot habaneros? Will these do for the chorizo? How much should I use? Duckie, please advise.
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Re: chorizo

Post by el Ducko » Sun Oct 14, 2012 02:20

grasshopper wrote:On the chorizo I did use 1/5 cup of vinegar.(76 gm) I wished I didn't, it is crumbly and I can taste the vinegar, a little bitter. I do love vinegar but not in my chorizo. next time I will use water. Remembering what CW taught us. Going to use soy powder concentrate to stiffen it up.This is just an opinion.
Sorry for the delay. I've been in Mexico, "doing culinary research" (eating too much).

The vinegar is there to give it a bit of tang, similar to that which a fermented sausage would have. By all means leave it out if you prefer- - this is sausage for YOUR enjoyment. Yes, the acidity interferes with the development of the proteins that make most sausages adhere together. I've tried mixing everything else with a little water to dissolve the salt and cure, then adding the vinegar later, and it helps a bit, but not entirely. Please share with the group how your soy powder concentrate experiment comes out. ...looking forward to hearing about it.

:mrgreen:
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Post by el Ducko » Sun Oct 14, 2012 02:24

IdaKraut wrote:ElDucko, your Tex/Mex chorizo recipe is really good. I used a tad more dried ancho peppers than you listed. The vinegar makes it taste great but it does make this a crumbly sausage, which I believe it is supposed to be. Anyway, thanks for posting this tasty recipe.
Thanks for the pat on the back. Hope you enjoy it. You'll soon become addicted to scrambled eggs with chorizo and a little salsa in tortillas, "taquitos de chorizo con huevo." Even without the tortillas, it's great. :mrgreen:
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Post by ssorllih » Sun Oct 14, 2012 02:41

redzed wrote:I don't know my peppers. We don't have the luxury of Mexican markets here, but this is what I was able to find at a supermarket, Jalapenos, some just labelled "red and yellow hot peppers", and the orange ones labelled "passilla". Now when I searched passilla peppers on the internet, they don't look like that. Could they be the hot hot habaneros? Will these do for the chorizo? How much should I use? Duckie, please advise.
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Those seem to me to be very small for pasicillas. Check this link: http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Caps_ann.html It seems to be one of the best.
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Post by el Ducko » Sun Oct 14, 2012 02:42

jbk101 wrote:Chuckwagon,
I plan on making it as soon as we get to that point of Project B. (Not wanting to get to ahead of the game) I was just reviewing all the recipes to make sure that I have all the ingredient's available. I'm kinda at a standstill on the Chorizo cause I need to pick up some Chile-Pasilla which I don't believe was in the original listing of spices when we started Project B.

I kind of guessed it was and extra ingredient but I wanted to make sure since my understanding is that the Phosphate was a binder and Powered Milk is considered a binder!
John
I hope this will help. There's nothing really sacred about passilla peppers. If you want, one great substitution that I can think of is New Mexico (Hatch) chiles. (They are a close cousin.)

Here's a handy little table that may be of use. The trade-off is that the flavor will change slightly. (You never know- - you just might like it better!):
Pepper Scoville Units
Bell ................................(0 - 100)
El Paso ........................(0 - 100)
Anaheim ........................(100 - 500)
Paprika ........................(250 - 1000)
Poblano ........................(500 - 1000)
Pasado (dried Anaheim) (500 - 2500)
Ancho (dried Poblano) ........(1000 - 1,500)
Passilla (Chilacas, dried Chile Negro) (1000 - 1,500)
New Mexico Green Chile (Hatch) (1,500)
Guajillo (dried Mirasol) (2,500 --6,000)
Jalapeno ........................(3,000 - 6,000)
Serrano ........................(5,000 - 15,000)
Yellow Caribe ................(5,000 - 15,000)
Aleppo ........................(10,000)
Cascabel ........................(11,000)
Chile de Arbol ................(15,000 - 30,000)

In place of the 11.5 grams per kilo (meat basis) of passilla peppers (1500 Scoville), you could substitute, say, (1500/6000) x 11.5 or 2.9 grams of Guajillo peppers. Flavor would be a little different, but it would be fun to try, yet will have the same "hotness." Whatever peppers are available in Indiana, tinker with 'em. That's part of the fun! (I'll call your life insurance agent...)(Naaah. Just kidding.) :mrgreen:
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Post by el Ducko » Sun Oct 14, 2012 02:43

snagman wrote:
el Ducko wrote:7.8 gm..paprika (sweet)
Hey ElDucko,

Ya ferget to write Sweet "Hungarian" paprika dinya ?

Gus
Yikes! My apologies! :mrgreen:
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Post by el Ducko » Sun Oct 14, 2012 02:58

redzed wrote:I don't know my peppers. We don't have the luxury of Mexican markets here, but this is what I was able to find at a supermarket, Jalapenos, some just labelled "red and yellow hot peppers", and the orange ones labelled "passilla". Now when I searched passilla peppers on the internet, they don't look like that. Could they be the hot hot habaneros? Will these do for the chorizo? How much should I use? Duckie, please advise.
Sorry for the delay. I've been "off planet" for a week. WooHoo! :roll:

I could get into real trouble, here, by recommending that the best way to find out is to take a little bite off the end of one and... WooHoo! WooHoo! :!:

The bell-shaped orange ones on the left look like habañeros. The green ones in the middle look like jalapeños. The ones on the right could be any one of a number of different types.

We're looking for dried chiles, by the way, so I'd suggest you either keep looking or else see Ross's post on making and toasting your own paprika. Properly dried peppers take a month or two, minimum. You might have to run over to Vancouver and find a Mexican grocery store ("Tienda Mexicana") to find your chiles. I don't know Victoria very well, but don't recall seeing any tiendas while wandering around when we were there last year.

Tell 'em El Pato sent you. WooHoo! WooHoo! WooHoo! (There goes any discount you might have had.) :mrgreen:
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chorizo

Post by grasshopper » Sun Oct 14, 2012 03:46

Duckie your sense of humor is great. I have to laugh at all your post,It is like a breath of fresh air. I did put soy powder concentrate in to stiffen the chorizo up and it did work fine. Actually I know nothing about chorizo. Some posted that it is supposed to be crumbly. I did not stuff it and it is in the freezer, until I learn more. I could not find the passilla so I used ground red jalapeno. So that leaves me with not the original taste. following a recipe is one thing But the ins and outs is another. :roll:
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Post by ssorllih » Sun Oct 14, 2012 03:59

I just took a good sized bite of some peppers that were sold as Hatch chilis. For me they are as mild as bell peppers. I did find some lovely red jalapenos a few weeks ago and dried and smoked them. After handling just licking my fingers was enough. The blend that I like to make is full of flavor but low on heat by comparison. http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.ph ... sc&start=0 Start here and read the thread.
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Post by redzed » Sun Oct 14, 2012 04:23

el Ducko wrote:

We're looking for dried chiles, by the way, so I'd suggest you either keep looking
Geez, and I spent half a day driving to and around Nanaimo and fighting the crowds in the supermarkets!

Can't I at least use these in the fresh sausage?
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Post by el Ducko » Sun Oct 14, 2012 04:52

redzed wrote:Can't I at least use these in the fresh sausage?
Sure. Maybe it's not traditional chorizo, but who cares as long as it tastes good. Call it "jalapeño (or whatever) sausage." ...or if it's made from green jalapeño peppers, call it "Redzed's Green Zed Sausage." Be sure to make it in three-link lengths, lay it out to make the letter "Z" with it, and claim that Zorro gave you the recipe. Hey! I know- - Zorro's Foxy Green Zed....

WooHoo! WooHoo! Yeow! :mrgreen:
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