Mold of various colors

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Butterbean
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Post by Butterbean » Sat Aug 19, 2017 16:01

I agree with Bob and expect its been shelf stable for some time. Like Bob says, if you like the texture and flavor now its best to seal and refrigerate. No harm in leaving it out but it will continue to transform and eventually it will become drier than it is now which might be good or may not depending on your preference. Myself, if I'm going to be eating on regularly, I'll just leave it out.
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Post by Sean » Sun Oct 08, 2017 11:35

Hi All

I'm a newbie and struggling a bit.
My Salami has turned mouldy white and green, the info from the net is very confusing some say bin it some say leave it.
Perhaps the more experienced guys can help a man out here!
Going to try post a pic!

http://imageshack.com/a/img922/460/yOTE1p.jpg
https://photos.app.goo.gl/wGAZtgDNAGY1B ... yOTE1p.jpg[/img]Image
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Post by Butterbean » Sun Oct 08, 2017 17:58

I'd just clean the mold off and not worry about it myself or just take the casing off and vacpac them. IMO, the important thing is to be sure its mold and not slime. If its slime, toss it. It just looks like native molds. While nature has few absolutes the odds are if it is a mold and growing on the surface of meat it is harmless. Not pretty though since we eat with our eyes first.

What you can do in the future is to clean your chamber good with a chlorox solution to kill all the native molds. Then inoculate your next batch good even going so far to spray the inside of your chamber with the inoculation mix. In time you will find less and less wild molds because the more aesthetically pleasing white mold will outcompete the natives. Right or wrong this is what I did and I got good results. Now I get white mold on stuff whether I desire it or not.

Hope this helps.
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Tue Oct 10, 2017 16:49

Hi Sean and welcome to the forum! Do as BB suggested above. In the picture you have a whole bunch of wild moulds on your sausages and unless you check them under a microscope you really don't know what's there. In a such collection of moulds most are usually non toxic and some are even the desirable strains that we want. Some may be toxic but it's the level and cell counts that would matter. Another thing to take into consideration is that even though many moulds are not harmful, they may impart undesirable flavours to your salami. Mould is a fungus, so look at it like a mushroom. When you are collecting mushrooms in the forest you can come across dozens of varieties in a day. You may find some that are poisonous but most of them will just taste awful but not make you sick. Of the dozens that you will see, a couple will be delicious, a few just OK. So it's the same with the mould on your sausage, you want moulds that will provide the highest benefit to your sausage and the best way to do that is to inoculate them with a commercial starter or from a quality artisan salami. That way you will have consistency and a safe product.

I would not bin your salami. They certainly look ready to eat, so take a good brush and clean off the mould, peel off the casing and enjoy. What you can't consume in the next week or so, vacuum seal an store in the fridge.
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Post by Sean » Tue Oct 10, 2017 18:20

Butterbean And Redzed thanks a mil! :mrgreen:
You guys rock!

I think I will clean them off with a Vinegar solution and leave then to hang a bit longer, they do not seam dry enough as yet. They are not slimy, just not firm yet.

I was also thinking of cleaning out my chamber with a product we have in South Africa called, "Milton" it is used to sterilize baby's bottles and teets. Do you think this will suffice?

I have made Guanciale (pigs cheeks bacon) in the chamber previously and turned out great. although it was cured for 24hrs in a spicy brine solution.

I am really enjoying this forum it is so informative, I am reading all the posts like a book
:razz:

Thanks again and I hope to have a long and fruitfull relationship with the forum!
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Butterbean
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Post by Butterbean » Wed Oct 11, 2017 01:01

I'm not familiar with that but I'm sure it would work. The reason I used a Chlorox solution is I was thinking there might be molds inside the air duct work in my chamber so I used a strong solution and ran the fridge thinking the chlorine in the air would also kill any molds in the duct work. I can't say if it actually made a difference or not but I haven't had any problems with mold in this chamber since. Also, once it was dried and aired out I did the same thing again only with the mold solution hoping to inoculate everything possible inside the chamber and its duct work. It seems to have worked.

Prior to doing this I used to have some really colorful molds which weren't to appetizing looking.
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Post by Sean » Wed Oct 11, 2017 07:07

Thanks for the info, think I will try the same after this batch.
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Post by airbrush » Wed Oct 11, 2017 11:34

Butterbean wrote:I'm not familiar with that but I'm sure it would work. The reason I used a Chlorox solution is I was thinking there might be molds inside the air duct work in my chamber so I used a strong solution and ran the fridge thinking the chlorine in the air would also kill any molds in the duct work. I can't say if it actually made a difference or not but I haven't had any problems with mold in this chamber since. Also, once it was dried and aired out I did the same thing again only with the mold solution hoping to inoculate everything possible inside the chamber and its duct work. It seems to have worked.

Prior to doing this I used to have some really colorful molds which weren't to appetizing looking.
After my last colorful event, I also used clorox. After washing, I allowed the interior to dry and then I rinsed it with distilled water. I'm only seeing white mold since.
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Post by Sean » Wed Oct 11, 2017 14:24

Thanks, I will be doing this after this batch.

How do I create a mold to spray on salamis?
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Post by airbrush » Wed Oct 11, 2017 15:39

Sean wrote:Thanks, I will be doing this after this batch.

How do I create a mold to spray on salamis?
Bactoferm 600.

Mold - 600 Bactoferm (TM) Sausage Mould( Formerly M-EK-4 )

Meat culture for production of moulded dried sausages with a white/cream coloured appearance. Mold-600 is a single strain culture containing spores of Penicillium nalgiovense in a convenient freeze-dried form. P. nalgiovense is a fast growing, traditional white mold culture for controlling the surface flora.

Mold-600 is particularly recommended for the production of traditional sausages dried at low temperature and/or low humidity.
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Post by Sean » Wed Oct 11, 2017 19:17

Thanks, Airbrush, but not available in South Africa.
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Thu Oct 12, 2017 16:37

Hi Sean, I did a bit of googling and found a source for starter cultures in SA, including Bactoferm 600, which contains the mould strain Penicilium Nalgiovense.
https://www.ubuy.za.com/brand/Bactoferm

But the cost is very high so I would look for a retailer that sells cheese making supplies and ask for penicillium candidum or penicilium camemberti, both will work well on salami.

Your other option is "backslopping" that is introducing the strain from existing products. If you can buy a salami with a good mould cover, you can remove the skin, place it in a small amount of distilled or non chlorinated water, and after 30 minutes stir well and spray on your salami and sevaral good squirts into your curing chamber.

I used Oxiclean to sterilise my chamber before I loaded it for the first time and after it stood empty for a few weeks. The primary ingredient of Oxiclean is Sodium percarbonate and I also use ut to clean and sterilise my winemaking equipment.
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Post by Sean » Thu Oct 12, 2017 17:30

Thanks Redzed

I did find it there as well and it is very pricey, I will try "backslopping" thanks for the info.
I want to clean out my chamber with Bleach and leave it for a few weeks and then clean out with distilled water. Oh yeah I will also try cheesemakers, we have a few of them in my area.
I am determined to make this work.
I cleaned my Salamis with a vinegar solution and brush, had to scrub quite a bit to get rid of it but they look more appetizing!

http://imageshack.com/a/img922/4089/7vj2um.jpg
https://photos.app.goo.gl/crXPlqrzeiZ22lM93
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