When mixing, when do I know I have the right bind?

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Webpoppy8
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When mixing, when do I know I have the right bind?

Post by Webpoppy8 » Fri Jul 28, 2017 01:34

I really don't know when to say it's mixed enough, and I don't know if there is some risk to over-working the mix. I am really not sure how to detect some kind of change.

I've read about "fuzzy" or "hairy" binds and I'm not really sure. I tried to find some videos but I really don't know this basic stuff. If I can work it nonstop for 20 minutes without ruining the mix in some other way, please tell me.

Thanks in advance!
DaveOmak
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Post by DaveOmak » Fri Jul 28, 2017 02:56

I mix my sausage until it is a sticky mess... I think it's the proteins that break down, correct me if I'm in error here, and form a "meat glue"... It needs to be stuffed, IMO, immediately before the meat glue stiffens into a "un-stuffable" mass if you are using a hand crank stuffer.. Then it can sit in the fridge to bloom, while in the casing, and the cure to do it's magic, if you plan on smoking the sausage...
If you are looking for tooth texture in your sausage, grind the meat through different size plates.. the smaller hunks will hold the larger hunks together and the texture will still be there... I grind the fat through a very small plate so it will intermingle well with the meat while the meat is in mostly larger hunks... Every sausage has different parameters that define it's origin.. sooo, experiment until you find something that WOWS you...
reddal
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Post by reddal » Fri Jul 28, 2017 22:08

I've also wondered about this.

When I was mixing by hand the answer was to stop when I was sick of mixing it! Nowadays I have a motorised mixer so I can easily mix it as long as I want.

I've heard people talking about the risks of 'over mixing' - but I've no idea how this would manifest itself. I mix for about 5 minutes - until there is a good bind and then some. Maybe it would be better if I did it longer?

When I make Chorizo - I've noticed that the texture is softer, more crumbly than commercial chorizo - which is almost rubbery in its texture. I wouldn't want that rubbery texture - but I would like the final product to be a bit more bound together. Maybe mixing longer would help with that?
DaveOmak
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Post by DaveOmak » Sat Jul 29, 2017 00:19

Image


I can't figure out the images... sorry....
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Sat Jul 29, 2017 12:02

Dave-
You need to use an image hosting site like Imgur, and post the BBCode (message boards & forums) link in your post. Just don't use Photobucket
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Butterbean
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Post by Butterbean » Sat Jul 29, 2017 19:06

I mix until its so tacky that I can take a handful of it and it will cling to my hand when my hand is turned over. When it finally breaks free then their are mini-meat stalactites on my hand.
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Butterbean
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Post by Butterbean » Sat Jul 29, 2017 19:15

reddal wrote:I've also wondered about this.

When I was mixing by hand the answer was to stop when I was sick of mixing it! Nowadays I have a motorised mixer so I can easily mix it as long as I want.

I've heard people talking about the risks of 'over mixing' - but I've no idea how this would manifest itself. I mix for about 5 minutes - until there is a good bind and then some. Maybe it would be better if I did it longer?

When I make Chorizo - I've noticed that the texture is softer, more crumbly than commercial chorizo - which is almost rubbery in its texture. I wouldn't want that rubbery texture - but I would like the final product to be a bit more bound together. Maybe mixing longer would help with that?
Don't know what type chorizo you make but the ones I'm are more familiar with use acidici ingredients like vinegar and this will effect the bind and make it crumbly.
reddal
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Post by reddal » Mon Jul 31, 2017 18:15

Butterbean wrote:Don't know what type chorizo you make but the ones I'm are more familiar with use acidici ingredients like vinegar and this will effect the bind and make it crumbly.
I don't add vinegar - but there is some white wine which is a bit acidic. The pH of the mix before fermentation is about 5.5 to 5.6 - so not too acidic.

I tend to use the chorizo when its dried to between 55% and 60% of initial weight - maybe if I left it until more like 50% it would be more solid - but there is always too much demand for it :).

Next batch I do I will try mixing the hell out of one part of it - and see what difference that makes.
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