Making a No Tang Sausage

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Kijek
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Making a No Tang Sausage

Post by Kijek » Fri Jan 12, 2018 22:13

Been doing research, I'm trying to make a dry cured sausage, soppressota, and all others sausages without any TANG.
I understand it has much to do with the ph of the meat
But beside buying ph meter and testing, what are some simple things to do to help produce a product with no, to very little TANG ?

Is it the sugars causing the tang or something else?
Laftpig
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Post by Laftpig » Fri Jan 12, 2018 22:25

Kijek

There is a soppressata recipe here that only use cure #2 and no cultures. This might be what your looking for.



Soppressata is made with natural flavors such as cumin, black pepper, red pepper and chilli peppers which are added to the meat which is then aged. Depending on the type of product, the aging process may last from a minimum of thirty to a maximum of one hundred days.

Meats Metric US
pork butt 800 g 1.76 lb.
back fat 200 g 0.44 lb.
Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of meat

salt 28 g 5 tsp.
Cure #2 2.5 g 1/2 tsp.
dextrose 10 g 2 tsp.
black pepper 2.0 g 1 tsp.
red pepper flakes 1.0 g 1/2 tsp.
whole peppercorns 2.0 g 1 tsp.
chili powder 1.0 g 1/2 tsp.
garlic powder 1.5 g 1/2 tsp.
Instructions

Grind meat and fat through 1/2" (12 mm) plate.
Mix ground meat with all ingredients.
Pack tightly in a container, cover with cloth and refrigerate for 48 hours.
Grind through 3/8" (10 mm) plate.
Stuff into 60 mm, 8-10" long hog middles.
Hang sausage at 68° F (20° C), 80-90% humidity for 2 days.
If smoky flavor is desired, apply cold smoke for 2 days.
Hold sausage at around 56° F (14° C), 80% humidity for about 2 months until it loses about 30% of its original weight.
If mold appears wipe it off with a cloth moistened with vinegar. You can cold smoke sausage again for a few hours which prevents the formation of mold.
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Post by Kijek » Fri Jan 12, 2018 22:32

Ok thanks I'll check it out, so basically when curing to produce little to no tang, you would just use cure #2 and nothing else besides you spices?
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Sat Jan 13, 2018 15:09

Tang/ acidification- Its a combination of several factors, and its hard to explain all in a short post.
The book The Art of Making Fermented Sausages by the Marianski's Covers the topic well. There are many excerpts from that book here https://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausag ... ed-sausage

Two good Soppressata strings that touch on the subject along with recipes.

http://www.wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopi ... sc&start=0

http://www.wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.php?t=7736
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Post by fatboyz » Sat Jan 13, 2018 16:04

Bob and Red might correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought the tangy taste was a result of the dropping PH. This is especially noticeable in sausages made in Canada and the US that use rapid acidifiers like GDL. Dropping the ph below the 5.3 mark can result in "tang". Using GDL to drop the PH you ferment just overnight for that result.
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Post by Kijek » Sat Jan 13, 2018 17:03

I understand what you are all saying, however, the only time I ever really got TANG was when I used a starter culture, so I thinking that is was did it.

Now I have developed slight TANG in some products without using any starter culture, and I'm guess that is due to drop in ph.

Wondering, is there something that help balance out the ph, one that helps keep things where you might want them?
Besides using a meter, I'm guessing this is all guess work.
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Sat Jan 13, 2018 19:01

1. Purchase a slow acidifying starter culture especially made for traditional Southern European salami. I would recommend Texel SA-301 or Bactoferm T-SPX
2. Add no more than 3g of appropriate sugar, if starting pH is 5.8.
3. Ferment at 18-20C to pH of 5.3 - 5.2
4. Dry sausage for a minimum period of 3 weeks with mould cover.
5. When ready for consumption pH will be back up to 5.6-5.8 and there will be no tang.
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Post by Kijek » Sat Jan 13, 2018 19:39

Ok I'll give that a try.
I copied your suggestions. Thanks.
I guessing the cheapest way to check ph is with strips?
Unless there is a meter that does really cost and arm & a leg?
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Post by Kijek » Sun Jan 21, 2018 16:33

Ok my Italian sausage has been in the chamber for about a month, so I thought I take a smaller piece and cut into it and see how I'm doing, and to see if I achieved that NO TANG flavor I was looking for from back when I made this, years ago with my father in-law.

I have to say, I did and excellent job with the flavor and reducing the TANG down to almost nonexistent, I'm very happy.

I think maybe another week before there fully cured, they are still just a tad soft in the middle.

Any constructive criticism from what you see? Does it look done?
I forgot to weigh some pieces for checking.

Image
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