Saucisson sec aux noix de macadam

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redzed
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Saucisson sec aux noix de macadam

Post by redzed » Wed Dec 03, 2014 17:36

This French style dry cured sausage was made using Poli's recipe for the Noisette. The only difference is that the better known version is made with the addition of hazelnuts (noisettes), but I thought that Hawaiian macadamia nuts would also complement this particular saucisson sec. I used raw fresh macadamias and toasted them to bring out their flavour and unique characteristics. The nuts worked well, do not fall out of the sausage like they did in one commercial salami I once purchased, are flavourful and pleasant to bite into. The saucisson was stuffed into 60mm specialty casings from Stuffers Supply and fermented with Mondostart 2M. It was dried for 6 weeks, should have hung longer, but I had to shut the chamber down. Now vacuum packed and in the fridge, equalizing a bit and waiting to be eaten over the Christmas season.
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Last edited by redzed on Thu Dec 18, 2014 00:02, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Devo » Wed Dec 03, 2014 18:46

Nice looking there Red. I made that recipe about two years ago but really wasn't that impressed with it. I guess I'm not much on putting nuts into salami. Hope you enjoy yours
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Wed Dec 03, 2014 20:24

That is a fancy name for French salami with nuts! :shock:

Bon appétit
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Post by markjass » Sat Dec 06, 2014 11:35

Yes, that looks stunning, something to aim for. Translations can take things away from things. Bob, I have had a hard day, and you have made me laugh, just what I needed, thank you. I suddenly imagined a romantic candle lit meal on the Seine. The waiter swanks up and says to me 'ere ave sume french salami with nuts'!
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Post by Gray Goat » Mon Dec 08, 2014 01:18

Very nice Red, you are operating at a very high skill level :lol:

I would LOVE to give that a taste, well done :grin:
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Post by redzed » Mon Dec 08, 2014 05:01

Gray Goat wrote:Very nice Red, you are operating at a very high skill level :lol:

I would LOVE to give that a taste, well done :grin:
Thanks Gray Goat, but it really is nothing that difficult. If I can do it, anyone can! And you have already begun the journey with tat great looking Umai pepperoni! Saucisson Sec is not different when it comes to the process. I had inherited a bit of knowledge about meat processing from my father who first worked in a slaughter house in Poland when he was 15. He is 90 now and still makes and smokes sausage. This time of year he is making about 200lbs or more per week. My dad had a small meat processing business in Western Canada until he sold it about 30years go and "retired". I worked with him while going to school but never had interest in the trade at that time. Now I regret that I did not take more interest since there was so much I could have learned.

So a few years ago when I retired, I started making and smoking sausage as a hobby. I had some fundamental knowledge about meat cutting and making Polish kielbasa, but I knew zero about fermented and dry cured sausages. By that time I had acquired a taste for Italian style salami and decided to make my own. At first it looked too complicated and when it came to the curing chamber I was thoroughly confused. I was an office monkey all my life and when it comes to anything mechanical, I am a complete techno-peasant. ( I could not even operate a fax machine because the secretary always did that for me.) But then I bought Marianski's Art of Fermented Sausages, read it twice, and things started to come together. I also got Ruhlman and Polcyn's books which, despite their drawbacks, are hugely inspirational. There are also numerous blogs on the subject and lot's of practical info on our forum by members who are also learning and actually making dry cured products.

So, there is nothing that difficult or mysterious about making great salumi at home. It's now easy to construct a curing chamber, better and cheaper temperature and humidity controls are available and starter cultures make it possible to make consistent and safe products. And we have a good group here willing to help. So go for it!
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Post by redzed » Tue Dec 16, 2014 05:31

I thought I would demonstrate here the difference in the same sausage two and a half weeks after being vac packed and rested in the fridge. Take a look at the saucisson sec at the top of the page and note the darkened colour on the outside. Below is is a pic I took today. The dry ring is gone, the little moisture that remained in the sausage is now distributed evenly throughout the sausage, and the flavour has improved!

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Post by markjass » Tue Dec 16, 2014 05:59

Oh yes. That is noticeable. I did the same thing with my coppa. It worked well. Thanks for posting the picture
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