Len Poli Sopressata recipe

nuynai
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Len Poli Sopressata recipe

Post by nuynai » Thu Mar 17, 2016 15:34

Hello everyone. I'm doing the above and it calls for incubating at 85 degrees for 15 hrs. Is this necessary or just to shorten cure time. Being a novice, just starting, I want all the help I can get to do it right and not get sick. Thanks in advance.
PS- the area I'm using for drying/ curing is around 60 degrees. No curing chamber.
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Post by Bob K » Thu Mar 17, 2016 17:25

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Post by nuynai » Thu Mar 17, 2016 19:48

Bactoferm LHP, as per his recommendation.
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Post by Bob K » Thu Mar 17, 2016 22:25

Ok yes fermenting is a necessary step.
If you don't have any books on the subject of making fermented sausages you should read through this: http://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausage ... ed-sausage
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Post by LOUSANTELLO » Fri Mar 18, 2016 01:28

This is a very similar recipe from what I just made and they are fantastic. I made 66 pounds. I did not use any white ground pepper. I used .6% dextrose instead of the .5% glucose. The salt looks a little low. I used 2.5% for safety along with the .25% cure #2. My brother makes them without a curing chamber at 55 degrees hanging, but he still wraps them in a bushel basket with towels for the 1st 24 hours which I imagine is his "fermentation process" at a higher temperature. A lot of people have also used oven racks in the oven for fermenting as long as there is not a pilot light The forum here has convinced me to purchase a PH tester. It really does take a lot of the guesswork out of the fermentation process.
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Post by LOUSANTELLO » Fri Mar 18, 2016 01:30

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Post by LOUSANTELLO » Fri Mar 18, 2016 01:31

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Post by LOUSANTELLO » Fri Mar 18, 2016 01:33

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Post by nuynai » Fri Mar 18, 2016 11:47

Thanks Guys. Guy I know does what his relatives from Italy do. No cure, no high temp, just hangs it in his basement but I not that trusting. My brother calls it, analysis paralysis. I call it being cautious.
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Post by LOUSANTELLO » Fri Mar 18, 2016 13:32

I agree. My brother is a little older than I, so he was more familiar when my family used to make it 40 years ago. He has been doing it the old way every year. This was the first year I made my own. I followed the "book", using cure, PH meters and a curing chamber along with fermentation process. Like the forum educated me, by doing it the new way, you have some degree of safety and WHY it works. If it doesn't work, you have some constant as to what you may have done wrong instead of guesswork. Also, by simply hanging in a basement, you really may not have the proper humidity which can cause the soppressata to dry too quickly. My brothers ended up at a 52% weight loss in 3 weeks. Mine was 40% at 6 weeks using the proper humidity. My color was much better. The biggest benefit I saw on his was he created no white mold, so he has the capability to vacuum pack with casings on. I would love to be able to do that instead of me having to remove the casings before vacuum packing.
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Post by redzed » Sat Mar 19, 2016 04:41

That particular Poli recipe is quite good since it asks for a minimum of seasonings and no fillers. But LHP is a fast acidifying cuture designed to produce a tangy/slightly sour flavour. In my opinion it is better suited for smoked and then semi dry sausages such as summer sausage and Scandinavian style salamis.

But everyone is different with what they like and often a bit of tang does work with spicier dry cured sausages as well.

Nuynai make sure you take pics and give us updates on your soppressata.
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Post by Shuswap » Sat Mar 19, 2016 14:57

redzed wrote:But LHP is a fast acidifying cuture designed to produce a tangy/slightly sour flavour.
Red what culture would you use to avoid the sour flavour?
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Post by LOUSANTELLO » Sat Mar 19, 2016 15:16

I personally used the 007
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Post by Bob K » Sun Mar 20, 2016 12:55

Shuswap wrote: redzed wrote:
But LHP is a fast acidifying cuture designed to produce a tangy/slightly sour flavour.

Red what culture would you use to avoid the sour flavour?
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Any of the cultures can produce either tangy or mild sausages. The tang is controlled by sugar content and temperature.
Some cultures are designed just to acidify, like LHP.

Others also have color and flavor forming bacteria included. like T-SPX or BLC-007
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Post by redzed » Sun Mar 20, 2016 17:42

Hey Phil, to add what Bob has already said, the selection of the starter culture is important in creating a specific type or style of dry cured sausage. When making a Southern European salami, we use a culture that has a slower acidification rate, less sugar (.3% - .5%) and ferment longer at lower temps. A longer drying period also raises the pH of the sausage, making it less tangy. This is caused proteolysis where, to put it simply, enzymes are secreted by the cocci strains of bacteria and molds and yeasts. When you check the pH of your salami after it has matured, you will more than likely find that it has gone back up to where you started.

And as to what specific culture to use, there are several available to us. I am currently using Bitec LM 1 and B-LC 007. The latter is becoming very popular because it comes with a strong bioprotective effect. In Canada you can also use Mondostart Classic which will also give you good results.

And I know that you like to delve deeper into these processes, so here is your readfing assignment for today. :lol:
http://www.intechopen.com/books/lactic- ... t-products
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