Bacon Recipe?

Post Reply
Kijek
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 430
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2018 16:05
Location: Stamford, Connecticut

Bacon Recipe?

Post by Kijek » Tue Jan 23, 2018 15:07

Did some searching and don't see any "Good Ol' Fashion" bacon recipes.
Would anyone like to share a proven recipe?
Also, when I'm curing the bacon, can I leave the bacon in the cure longer then recommended time?
I will be Vac Sealing for the curing process
User avatar
Bob K
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2102
Joined: Sun Jun 02, 2013 15:16
Location: Northwest Ct

Post by Bob K » Tue Jan 23, 2018 15:53

Basic bacon is just salt, cure and sugar. There are probably as many bacon recipes out there as Italian sausage recipes :shock:

SAlt 2.5-3%
Sugar 1-2%
Cure #1 .192% or do not exceed 120 ppm

Any spices you care to add to taste.

Cure in fridge for two weeks or more
Kijek
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 430
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2018 16:05
Location: Stamford, Connecticut

Post by Kijek » Tue Jan 23, 2018 16:02

Thanks, actually that is just what I looking for, as I have an idea in my head for something new in the flavor profile area.
I be posting pics, as soon as I can get my hands on some whole pork belly, not having much luck.

Thanks again, coping & pasting to notes.
Kijek
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 430
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2018 16:05
Location: Stamford, Connecticut

Post by Kijek » Tue Jan 23, 2018 16:12

Oh wow, I just found the cure calculator @ meat and sausages. com

What a great tool.

https://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausag ... calculator
airbrush
User
User
Posts: 68
Joined: Wed Feb 01, 2017 13:39
Location: Florida

Post by airbrush » Tue Jan 23, 2018 19:10

Bob K wrote:Basic bacon is just salt, cure and sugar. There are probably as many bacon recipes out there as Italian sausage recipes :shock:
SAlt 2.5-3%
Sugar 1-2%
Cure #1 .192% or do not exceed 120 ppm
Any spices you care to add to taste.
Cure in fridge for two weeks or more
I've done a number of bacons. The flavors came through just fine but they're all very salty. Is soaking the remedy?

How do the commercial houses produce smoked bacon without so much salt?
reddal
User
User
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2017 16:26
Location: an Island

Post by reddal » Tue Jan 23, 2018 20:48

airbrush wrote:I've done a number of bacons. The flavors came through just fine but they're all very salty. Is soaking the remedy?
Yes - I've found soaking/rinsing is the key to controlling saltiness of bacon. If necessary leave for several hours in cold water - and repeat if necessary. However once I worked the kinks in my recipe and curing I found I didn't have to soak anything like so long in order to get the right amount of saltiness.
fatboyz
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 308
Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2016 19:26
Location: Alberta

Post by fatboyz » Wed Jan 24, 2018 02:23

I posted earlier about bring and got a bit of a rant. I talked to my Swiss butcher buddy about what they did. They made a brine that was between 7 and 8% salt. they used it for hams, bacon hocks and what not. They ran it through their brine injection machine then through it in a tub with all the extra brine for 2-3 days then smoked it. They did 2-300 hams a week and 1-200 slabs of Bacon at their shop Rocky meats before it burnt last year.It was awesome and never salty.
cathouse willy
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 45
Joined: Wed Aug 16, 2017 17:57
Location: New Westminster

Post by cathouse willy » Wed Jan 24, 2018 19:10

From the Bradley smoker forum,this is my goto recipe. I always skin the belly before curing.



Maple Cured Bacon
From Tenpoint5

Ingredients:

2 oz. Kosher salt (about 1/4 cup)
2 tsp. Cure #1 (aka pink salt, InstaCure #1, Prague Powder #1)
1/4 C. Maple sugar or packed brown sugar
1/4 C. Maple syrup

5 lb. fresh pork belly
(Makes enough for a 5 lb. belly)

Directions:

Combine all dry ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Add syrup and stir
until well combined.
If the mixture is too thick, you can add more syrup to thin it.



Rub cure mixture on belly making sure to cover the entire surface. Place
skin side down in a 2 gallon sealable bag, and expel all air, and fold the
empty end of the bag under so that the belly is in close contact with the
bag. During the curing time the belly will release liquid, and it is
important that this liquid stay in contact with the meat.

Refrigerate at 34 - 40°F (the closer to 40°F the better) for 5 to 7 days,
until belly is firm to the touch with no soft spots. During the curing
time, turn the bag over once a day or once every other day to redistribute
the cure.

When belly is fully cured, rinse it thoroughly, and pat it dry. Place it
on an inverted Bradley rack set over a baking sheet, and air dry uncovered
in the refrigerator overnight (12 - 24 hours).
If you don`t have the refrigerator space to air dry the bacon you can do
this step in the Bradley. Preheat the Bradley to 100 - 120°F with vent
wide open, and place your room temperature bacon in the smoker. To get
these low temperatures you will need to use the "cold smoke setup". Do
not apply smoke at this time. You just want to dry the bellies until
they are tacky when touched. Depending on the size of your load, this
generally takes about 2 hours, but to be on the safe side check the
bellies after one hour.

Smoking/Cooking

Once bacon has been air dried place into a 120 - 140° preheated smoker
with vent half open.
If air dried in the refrigerator, set the bellies out in room
temperature for 1 - 2 hours before placing them in the smoker.

If you air dried it in the Bradley, increase the temperature to 120 -
140°, close to vent to half open, and begin to apply your smoke.

The amount of smoke is up to you. I generally will only apply 2 hours,
using maple.

After you have applied your smoke, increase the heat to 160°F, and
smoke/cook the bacon until an internal temperature of 150°F is reached.
Or increase the temperature to 150°F, and smoke/cook until an IT of
140°F is reached.


After the desired internal temperature has been reached, remove from
smoker and allow to cool slightly. When cool enough to handle, but still
warm pull the skin off (you may need a sharp knife to help) making sure
you leave as much fat on the bacon as possible.
User avatar
Bob K
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2102
Joined: Sun Jun 02, 2013 15:16
Location: Northwest Ct

Post by Bob K » Wed Jan 24, 2018 19:29

cathouse willy wrote:Smoking/Cooking

Once bacon has been air dried place into a 120 - 140° preheated smoker
with vent half open.
If air dried in the refrigerator, set the bellies out in room
temperature for 1 - 2 hours before placing them in the smoker.

If you air dried it in the Bradley, increase the temperature to 120 -
140°, close to vent to half open, and begin to apply your smoke.

The amount of smoke is up to you. I generally will only apply 2 hours,
using maple.

After you have applied your smoke, increase the heat to 160°F, and
smoke/cook the bacon until an internal temperature of 150°F is reached.
Or increase the temperature to 150°F, and smoke/cook until an IT of
140°F is reached.

Why are you cooking/smoking to an IT of 140° F? The smoke is just for flavor. There is no need to risk overdoing it. Maple flavored bacon in wonderful!!
cathouse willy
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 45
Joined: Wed Aug 16, 2017 17:57
Location: New Westminster

Post by cathouse willy » Wed Jan 24, 2018 19:42

My bacon gets 3 hrs of maple smoke (I like smoke flavor) and then I keep cooking till the it is 145f. Depending on the load this will take another 2 or so hours without any more smoke.
harleykids
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 310
Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2016 03:03
Location: Olathe, KS

Post by harleykids » Sun Jan 28, 2018 18:29

I never cook my bacon.
I just smoke it for a few hours, par freeze for easier slicing, and then freeze.
It cooks in the pan when you cook it, no need to cook it before hand!
Post Reply