My favorite stuffer

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Chuckwagon
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Post by Chuckwagon » Mon Aug 27, 2012 04:38

Circlecross, that is a beauty! Sorta like my first girlfriend... well built with lots of curves and very sturdy! :roll:
And goodness... look at the patina on the cast iron. If only that sweet thing could talk! I'd like to know what has been pressed through it over time. Probably some great recipes.
Last edited by Chuckwagon on Mon Aug 27, 2012 04:58, edited 1 time in total.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Gulyás » Mon Aug 27, 2012 04:50

I bout a stuffer like that, loooong time ago. I painted it outside with epoxy paint. Once I wanted to use it, but could not find the stuffer tube, so I made a new one, from stainless steel, very heavy duty. It's collecting dust in my basement, because I got stainless steel stuffers.
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circlecross
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Post by circlecross » Mon Aug 27, 2012 12:10

I prefer the old things and old ways. It reinforces my sense that sausage making is an art.
Sausage King of Love County!
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NorCal Kid
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Post by NorCal Kid » Mon Aug 27, 2012 15:18

That's a great old stuffer!
I've seen the modern replicates on the market ($$$), plus some vintage ones pop up on ebay quite regularly (in various stages of decay)-but that one of yours is a real beauty!

Kevin
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Post by Gulyás » Mon Aug 27, 2012 15:46

You're right Kevin. Mine was an oooold rusty one, with no paint left on it, that's why I repainted it. I sandblasted it first.

Joe.
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Post by nuynai » Mon Aug 27, 2012 16:05

In the days they were made, they knew what Multitasking was before it even became a word. Nice find.
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Post by Gulyás » Mon Aug 27, 2012 17:20

Yes sir.

They called it old-time craftsmanship.
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circlecross
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Post by circlecross » Mon Aug 27, 2012 17:36

My grandfather was one of those old time craftsmen. He grew and harvested his own corn, Fed it to his own hogs, which he butchered himself. He made his own hams, bacon, and sausage. He had a wooden smokehouse, tall and large enough to walk in. It had a small stone exterior firebox. As a child, I was ordered to keep a tiny fire of hickory going in the firebox. It delighted me to have such an important job, and it kept me happy and busy for hours.! Years later, I finally figured out that grandpa was keeping me out of the way as he and my uncle and my dad were cooking off White Lightning in the barn.
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Chuckwagon
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Post by Chuckwagon » Wed Aug 29, 2012 07:39

Topic Split 082912@0038 by Chuckwagon. See this date in "Chat" in Hyde Park.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by ssorllih » Wed Aug 29, 2012 14:54

I guess that it is because I do all of the cooking here that I choose to make small batches of sausage. I know what our rate of consumption is and the wide range of taste that we enjoy. The pork butts come in neat little ten pounds pieces and I usually cut them into three pieces for roasting, curing as ham or grinding. In this way I can pull two packages from the freezer for grinding and make about 6 or 7 pounds of sausge.
Ross- tightwad home cook
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Post by Gulyás » Thu Aug 30, 2012 21:30

Well. That "Kirby Cannon" stuffer is interesting.....

If somebody wants to build a big one, I mean a biiiiiiiig one, I have the tubing for it. It's glass. :lol:

Hole size 6" about 36" long, wall thickness is 3/8. It's even flared at the ends.

Image

Image

Image

It would be a big cannon..... :lol:
Failure to prepare is preparing to fail.
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