stuffer recomendation?

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Blackriver
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stuffer recomendation?

Post by Blackriver » Sun Feb 24, 2013 23:02

Hello I have a Gander Mountain 15 lb stuffer and hate it. It is really hard to turn the handle while stuffing. I have to use two hands to even turn it. This is with the largest horn stuffing fibrous casings for summer sausage. I am am adding water to the sausage mix and I am stuffing right after mixing so I don't think that is the problem. Here is the link to the stuffer I have. The Gander one is 1 speed.

http://www.gandermountain.com/modperl/p ... i?i=401088

I am looking at a Tre Spade stuffer to replace my stuffer. Has anyone had any experience with these stuffers? The Tre Spade is 2 speed.

http://www.trespade.it/en/ricerca_detta ... OTTO=21700

I am also looking at the Cabelas stuffer Sawhorse just got. I am hoping one of these stuffers is easier to crank than the one I got. Any suggestions would be great
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Post by ssorllih » Sun Feb 24, 2013 23:23

There is an engineering problem to be solved when making a stuffer. The number of turns needed on the crank to move the piston one inch dertermines the force the piston exerts on the meat for each pound of force you put on the crank. A small diameter piston will apply more force per square inch than will a large diameter piston, If the maker uses the same mechanism on a 15 pound stuffer as they use on a 5 pound stuffer with the same length of piston travel it will take at least 3 times as much force on the crank for the larger stuffer. Either the gear ratio must change or the pitch of the treaded shaft must change to keep the force on the crank handle within reason.
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Post by dpeart » Mon Feb 25, 2013 00:12

I really like mine, it is very easy to turn.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-MTN-Commerc ... 51a8c7a05f

dave
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Post by Blackriver » Mon Feb 25, 2013 02:29

Ross you make a very good point. It makes sense. I also have a five pound stuffer and the gears are smaller but it is a smaller stuffer. The 15lb is the same design bigger gears but bigger cylinder. I think there is nothing wrong with my 15lb stuffer it just takes a lot more elbow grease to crank it. Now the Tre Spade I am looking at is similar to the one Dave has. It has a smaller diameter cylinder but it is taller still having the 15lb capacity. So do you agree the Tre Spade would be easier to crank? I hate having to keep refilling my 5 lb stuffer that is why I went with the 15lb. I want a larger capacity stuffer my wife or kids can crank while helping me.
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Post by ssorllih » Mon Feb 25, 2013 03:20

The surface area of the piston increases as to the square of the diameter. So a 6 inch piston is 50% bigger that a 5 inch piston it would therefore require 50% more force to extrud the sausage. a better gear ratio would balance that. Edit to add: also a longer crank handle would serve the same purpose.
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Post by Gulyás » Mon Feb 25, 2013 06:32

I have the same stuffer as Dave's, mine is 7 liter, but never used it yet, because I made smaller bathes of sausages lately.

Link for my stuffer.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Commercial- ... 4ac1d05a74
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Post by crustyo44 » Mon Feb 25, 2013 07:33

I have the same stuffer as Dave for the last 2 years. Easy to wind and a breeze to fill up. The cylinder swings out and refill in 30 seconds.
A great stuffer.
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Re: stuffer recomendation?

Post by sawhorseray » Mon Feb 25, 2013 17:21

Blackriver wrote: I am also looking at the Cabelas stuffer Sawhorse just got. I am hoping one of these stuffers is easier to crank than the one I got. Any suggestions would be great
I think the one I purchased from Cabelas would be very difficult to use without the electric motor. Standing at a normal height counter I'd have to be reaching over the top of my shoulder at the top of the rotation. That would make it awkward to keep a hand on the stuffing tube, and rapidly grow old on my shoulder full of arthritis. The inside diameter of the meat tank is 7 &1/2", the top of the cranking rotation at 5'6" placed a standard height counter top, I'm 5'10". I just checked and the slower speed gear handle attachment is located 1 & 1/2' HIGHER up, and further back, making even more of a chore. I doubt there'd be any wear and tear on body parts at your age, tho you'd need help to have both hands free. Of course you could always put the family to work now and get the motor later, after the rebellion. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: RAY
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Post by ssorllih » Tue Feb 26, 2013 02:15

Is there a good reason that a stuffer must be vertical? If it were laid on its side and the crank rotated in a horizontal plane the motion on the shoulder would be less complex.
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Post by partycook » Tue Feb 26, 2013 02:33

My experince with differnt types of sausage stuffers.
When I first started making sausage we stuffed using a hand grinder with a stuffing tube.Then I had a horn type stuffer,it leaked and I really did not enjoy making sausage in links we made mostly patty's. Later on I was able to buy a 5 lb. suffer with nylon gears. I also had a nephew that was a football player that enjoyed making and eating sausage. Needless to say his speed and strength were no match for the nylon gears. So I upgraded to a 15 lb. stuffer with metal gears. Although the 15 was a great improvement it still was not the easy thing to use alone. Then there was a article on the old F. Dick stuffers that were made in Germany that had 2 speeds . I found one that was in good shape that was from about 1950 on E-bay although it is a bit big it still is a better machine than all of the new ones and one person use is very easy.

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Post by sawhorseray » Tue Feb 26, 2013 06:49

ssorllih wrote:Is there a good reason that a stuffer must be vertical? If it were laid on its side and the crank rotated in a horizontal plane the motion on the shoulder would be less complex.
From what I see of what I've got I'd think that to be very feasable Ross, tho there'd be some propping up of the unit and space-crampping to take into consideration, especially with the one I already have. I'd have liked to try it without the electric motor attached but I've already re-assembled everything and I'm not going to be looking back. !8 pounds of de-boned chicken thighs in the fridge marrying with the seasonings overnight, add two cups chardonney and mix in the morning, stuff into 32-25mm hog casings. My goal will be to become more effecient with the speed of the motor and more relaxed with the entire process. There's no rush on my end, I prefer 8-9 inch sausages, so I'm going to gear that baby down and make it work the way I want. Just like back during my 32 years as a carpenter, "if it breaks it needed replacing anyway". RAY
“Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment.”
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