People Making Sausages

pikeman_95
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People Making Sausages

Post by pikeman_95 » Sat Feb 02, 2013 03:01

When we have a group of us and it is cold outside. This is how we handle it. Set up the old tent and get after it. The buckets are just the ground pork. We have a sink with hot and cold running water out there and lots of light.
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We set up some tables and get after it.

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Now after stuffing into the smoker for a couple of hours of heavy smoke.

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then into the hot water tank to bring it up to cure temperature. First into the tank rack.

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Here is the tank.

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Here is a video on the tank

action=view&current=SUMMERSAUSAGEINHOTWATERBATH.mp4



Then into the cold water bath.

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Now time for the German Frankfurters.

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http://s943.photobucket.com/albums/ad274/pikeman_95/?
Last edited by pikeman_95 on Sat Feb 02, 2013 05:45, edited 1 time in total.
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CrankyBuzzard
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Post by CrankyBuzzard » Sat Feb 02, 2013 03:03

Try stuffing like these folks do! They seem to be having fun!

Stuffing options

Or am I acting like another reprobate on here? :shock: :lol:

I use a 5# vertical stuffer here and it works really well for me, but I also find sausage making a relaxing hobby. Not to mention that I used a press type horn stuffer growing up and still hate it to this day!

Now, for those that use their grinder as a stuffer as well, any issues with texture loss?

Charlie
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Post by pikeman_95 » Sat Feb 02, 2013 03:21

You are right. We had a fun time and made some very good sausage.

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At the end of the weekend I was beat.

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Post by Baconologist » Sat Feb 02, 2013 03:34

Looks like it does a good job of stuffing.

How about filling the chambers?

Seems like 4 and 6 inch would be pretty cramped.
Godspeed!

Bob
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Post by pikeman_95 » Sat Feb 02, 2013 04:10

Well interesting you should ask. This is like loading a cannon. you must make some foot ball shaped balls of meat and set them in the end. The loading tool has on surface that is flattened out to let the air get by. This way you load the stuffer full with out trapping air in the meat.

This picture captures the meat loading tool.

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the back of the loading tool has a hose fitting and the pipe threaded through the white disk is over threaded. When you are using it to load meat it is capped. when you are cleaning the stuffer you take the cap off and put a spray head on and use it as a washing tool. Here is a video of loading the stuffer with one of my old loading tools without the ability to spray built into it.

http://s943.photobucket.com/albums/ad27 ... THMEAT.mp4


kc
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sat Feb 02, 2013 05:25

Hey, hey, Kirby Campbell in beautiful Missoula, Montana. Your photos are terrific. I really like the one of your stalwart crew. Such a dedicated bunch of fellows eh? By the way, the sausage looks terrific too. Shucks, folks in the west appreciate a "portable" (chuckwagon type) kitchen! I think it's great. Good times for family and friends. Keep lots of photos in your scrapbook for your old age.

In case our readers don't recognize KC, he's Kirby... you know... the guy that MAKES the Kirby Stuffing Cannon. Good luck to you sir. :wink:

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Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by pikeman_95 » Sat Feb 02, 2013 06:21

Thanks for the nice post Chuckwagon. You are right it is fun when we get together to do a batch. Lost of laughs and lots of work. I am going to retire soon and am looking forward to have more time to make some of the great recipes that the members have come up with. We have developed a excel sheet that automatically adjust the spice weights. If any one is interested in some of the recipes that some of the Bradley guys have put together drop me an email to Kirby_campbell@yahoo.com and I will send it to you. The summer sausage recipe that is shown in my post is in the group.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sun Feb 03, 2013 09:28

Topic Split - 2.3.13 @ 01:27 by CW~ See "Using A Horn Stuffer?" in the "Sausages" forum.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Kabanosy I made

Post by Blackriver » Thu May 01, 2014 00:01

Well I decided to make some Kabanosy. I have to be honest I was a bit nervous about letting the sausages air dry for several days at room temp. I have to give out a huge thanks to Chuckwagon who was very patient with me about asking so many questions!! We are very lucky to have someone who has so much knowledge about sausage making and who is so kind to answer my questions. Without Chuckwagon's help these would not have turned out as good as they did.

I did a 5 lb batch from the recipe in Stan's book "Home production of quality meats and sausages"

I used 5lbs of pork shoulder for the meat. Here is a picture of the sausages in the smoker.

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I ended up smoking for 2 hours then I moved the sausage into a 170 degree oven till they were done.

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At first I hung the Kabanosy to air dry from our dining room light fixture, the wife was not very happy about that. Chuckwagon gave me a great idea and I moved the Kabanosy to my wife's cookie drying racks. Here they are after 2 days of drying.

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Here they are after 4 days of drying and 45% weight loss.

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Time to sample they are very good! It was worth the work.

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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu May 01, 2014 00:20

Good goin' Scott! Verrrry nice indeed. And thanks for the kind remarks! Much appreciated, ol' pal.
The texture looks terrific. The casing will become even more dark-mahogany in another day or so.
Just a note here... the Polish don't emulsify this sausage or even develop the proteins very much by mixing it. The sausage is "folded" rather than "mixed". This makes for a very "loose" texture and typical kabanosy is quite fatty.
On the other hand, I like a leaner recipe with the stuff mixed quite a bit to develop the actin and myocin proteins, so that the final "stix" will be just a bit "chewy" to the bite - sort of an American thing going on here I believe! :roll:
Hey Blackriver... you'll be making these quite often I predict. They are habit-forming!

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by sawhorseray » Thu May 01, 2014 00:26

They look great Blackriver, really nice job. What size casing do you stuff them into, and what type? That's four days on racks at normal inside temperature, like 72°? I'd really like to try that using a combo of wild and domestic pig meat. RAY
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Post by Blackriver » Thu May 01, 2014 12:02

Thanks for the compliments guys. Ray the casings I used are from Syracuse casing company. I am very happy with them. They are pre flushed and tubed. All you have to do is rinse the salt off with tap water, soak them in warm water and then slide the tube on the horn. One other thing, they stink bad so don't worry about it as soon as you rinse them and stuff them the smell goes away. Also they are wonderful to deal with especially if you have any questions.

http://www.makincasing.com/x/product.ph ... =10&page=1

I dried mine at room temperature which is between 65-70 degrees.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu May 01, 2014 21:45

Sawhorse Ray wrote:
That's four days on racks at normal inside temperature, like 72°?
Ray, the sausage is only 20 m. m. thick and is in sheep casing. You can also use 19 m.m. collagen for much less money. The sausage is prep-cooked to 148°F immediately after stuffing to guard against trichinella spiralis. The cooking puts a real "headstart" on the drying process on this particularly thin sausage. The recipe has enough salt in it to guard against pathogenic bacteria at the onset of the drying process. The thin diameter enables the sausage to dry very quickly to a safe Aw 0.86 in no time at all. This prevents the growth of campylocater, e.coli, clostridium botulinum, salmonella shigella listeria, and bacillus. The only bacterium requiring further drying is staphylococcus aureus, but even that one is removed at Aw 0.85. However, this is still a "semi-dry cured" sausage and it is best to refrigerate it for storage. You can keep it from over-drying by placing it in a paper sack inside your refrigerator.

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Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by sawhorseray » Thu May 01, 2014 22:42

I've got a couple of small packets of 20-22mm sheep casings that they say are good for about 15 pounds of sausage each, so I could at least use what's here. I don't know what "prep-cooked" means, I thought the sausage would go into the smoker after stuffing. RAY
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu May 01, 2014 23:15

Ray,
Prep-cooking is done mostly for safety but for convenience also. The Jimmy Dean "Brown n` Serve" sausage is prep-cooked sausage. By heating sausage to about 148°F immediately after stuffing, the manufacturer guards against trichinella spiralis. The cooking also destroys some pathogenic bacteria in the sausage and it is made somewhat safe by the processor before being fully cooked by the consumer to at least 155°F or more. Meat may be prep-cooked for "semi-dry cured" products also. The cooking puts a real "headstart" on the drying process, particularly in making thin, cased, sausage like kabanosy. However, a recipe must have at least enough salt in it to guard against pathogenic bacteria at the onset of the drying process. Of course, a thinner-diameter enables a sausage to dry very quickly to a safe Aw 0.86. Thicker diameters of sausage are popular also. Housewives cooking breakfast, find it convenient - it's half cooked! The prep-cooking to at least 148°F (with some drying) prevents the growth of campylocater, e.coli, clostridium botulinum, salmonella shigella listeria, and bacillus. Once the bacteria are destroyed, a little further simple drying finishes the "semi-dry" curing process.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Last edited by Chuckwagon on Fri May 02, 2014 00:17, edited 1 time in total.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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