Recipe wanted..Kransky

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Recipe wanted..Kransky

Post by BlueMonkey » Wed Sep 07, 2016 03:09

Hi All,

Does anyone have a (traditional) Kranky recipe please. I am looking to as authentic as possible. No cheese.

Thanks so much for your help.
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Wed Sep 07, 2016 12:10

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Post by fatboyz » Wed Sep 07, 2016 18:04

Looks like a nice sausage. I have some left over lamb I wanted to try a sausage with. This looks like the one to use it up on.
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Post by xúc xích » Fri Sep 09, 2016 17:13

Blue Monkey, check your PM(Private Messages) up on the top.
Cheers Greg
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Post by BlueMonkey » Thu Oct 20, 2016 13:32

First, I would like to thank Greg and Bob for their help on this project.

I ended up by going with a Kaiserwurst ( otherwise known as Kransky) recipe, which I think is also in here somewhere from one of chuck wagons Posts, co-authored by Miroslaw "Mac" Stanuszek.

It called for about 85% Pork, and 15% beef, salt and pepper, and a shed load of garlic. The taste was fantastic, exactly what I was looking for.

That was the taste.

The skin was leather, well, an exaggeration. Suede, but only the skin and a millimetre of the circumference.

So now I am looking for some further help please.

I used Hog casings, about 36mm, and filled them taut, but not bursting.
I hung them in the fridge for 12 hours, then into room temperature for about 30 minutes before putting into my "smokehouse" ( converted drum with a gas burner) which was preheated to 130°F. (54°C.)
After an hour, every 20 minutes or so I increased the temperature by a few degrees. ( This was a bit hit and miss, turn a smidge and the flame would rage, readjust back down and it would extinguish), but overall it was satisfa
ctory. End result is the fat did not break.
Probably took about 5 or 6 hours in total.
When the internal reached 150°F I immediately removed and put into an ice slurry.

So, where have I gone wrong?

My initial thought is to either

a/ Decrease the time it is exposed in the hot smoke as it may be drying out the surface too much
b/. Use Collagen casing
and/or
c/. Cold smoke for 4 or 5 hours then poach, steam, or bake.

Would collagen allow for the smoke to permeate through the sausage, and would it be robust enough to hang in the smokehouse/poach etc?

Any advice/ suggestions would be much appreciated.

Thanks in anticipation,
Tony
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Post by Butterbean » Thu Oct 20, 2016 14:11

I don't have a clear answer but here are a few things you might consider.

Flushing and being sure casings are well hydrated can help. Personally, I put a whole hank in a bucket of water when I first begin making sausages even if I'm only making a few. I find this much easier than trying to untangle dry casings and when I've finished I just place the extra into a colander and cover with salt and let dry then put back in fridge. Have also found using the 40lb bags of pool salt they sell for $4.95 soothes my frugal nature.

Another possibility is you are heating with gas which is a dry heat. I don't know how you are generating smoke but if its from purchased chips or pellets or dust these are also dry and you may find it helpful to add humidity to your smoker. I use a blend of dry and green firewood and this keeps the humidity in the smoker at 60-70% even with gas sourced heat.

You may also find it helpful to let the sausages hang at room temperature at least 2 hours before putting them in the smoker rather than the 30 minutes.

Sometimes, casings are just tough. Adding lemon juice or vinegar to the water and soaking them for a couple hours can help this.

If it were me, I'd try the lemon juice and also check the humidity in the smoker and make adjustments if need be and see if this doesn't help.
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Post by BlueMonkey » Thu Oct 20, 2016 14:17

Thanks BB
The skins were well hydrated, and well flushed. Apple cider vinegar at about 10%.
Used Venturi system, pumping smoke into the drum with an aquarium pump.
I will watch the humidity.

Worth while trying Collagen?
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Post by Butterbean » Thu Oct 20, 2016 15:32

I'd think collagen would work but you'd need to be sure to get the ones suitable for hanging on not the thin one's or they will break.
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Post by redzed » Thu Oct 20, 2016 16:51

There are so many causes of tough casings. The main one is inadequate soaking and flushing. Another one is drying the sausage to long or in very low humidity. The casing should be dry to the touch but not hard or feel like paper. Long hours of smoke also dry out the casing and home sausage makers usually smoke longer and drier than our commercial counterparts. From my experience, hot smoking sausage in 40mm casings results in a 10% weight loss, which is essentially water. So if your sausage has a low water content, the casings may be drier and tougher. Cooling in ice water is the thing to do to prevent wrinkling and to stop the sausage from cooking, but you don't want to chill it entirely. You still want the sausage to remain warm on the inside so that the heat coming out of the sausage will keep the casing moist. Most professionals only shower the sausage with cold water when it comes out of the smoke house.

And I'm not entirely convinced about the use of vinegar. None of the guys on the Polish forum use it when soaking casings and I have yet to see any science behind this application. If anyone has any credible references to this, I would love to see them.
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Post by Bob K » Thu Oct 20, 2016 16:56

My solution to dry sausage (electric smoker) has been to smoke at a low temp for flavor, usually two or three hours at 130f , and then poach until desired temp.
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Post by Bubba » Thu Oct 20, 2016 21:42

At my end I am nowhere near as experienced as other members here, all I can share is how I smoke my sausage with pork casings. They do not have a tough casing.

I soak casings overnight, the supplier says 30 minutes before stuffing and I never soak them for a short time as they recommend.

After stuffing they hang overnight in the refrigerator, then I dry them as Butterbean said.

The initial smoking temperature I use is 110 F, after tweaking the Amazin smoker tray location and air flow I now get even smoke distribution. The temperature is not adjusted while smoke is applied.

After applying smoke the temperature is bumped up in 5 degree intervals.

Once the sausages get to about 130 F I let them stay there for about 30 minutes then transfer to warm water, starting with the same temperature as it left off in the smoker, then bump it up slowly.

Quick cold shower after they reach 150 IMT

That seems to work well for me.

My one question is:- would there be a difference in casing quality from one supplier to another? In years gone by I found that some casings are tough, even when I made fresh sausage around that time. These days I buy pre-tubed, pre-flushed. They are more expensive but work very well.

Have a look at these I posted a while back while still on the learning curve with my smoker, link below (scroll to the bottom of the page):-

http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.ph ... &start=810
Ron
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Post by Butterbean » Fri Oct 21, 2016 13:28

Bubba wrote:My one question is:- would there be a difference in casing quality from one supplier to another? In years gone by I found that some casings are tough, even when I made fresh sausage around that time. These days I buy pre-tubed, pre-flushed. They are more expensive but work very well.
I think this is the case at times.

I made some a while back where some were tough and some were not. What I seem to remember is some of the casings looked thicker and had these warty pimply bumps on them. I don't know if anyone else has noticed these things and don't know if they have anything to do with it but next time I see this I plan on keeping these separate to see if this has anything to do with it.

I can't complain about my casings because the meat monger I buy them from sells them to me pretty cheap and they are of good quality. With one strand I have stuffed 16 lbs of sausage without the first break or hole. I don't think you can ask for better than that.
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Post by Bubba » Fri Oct 21, 2016 14:24

Butterbean wrote:I made some a while back where some were tough and some were not. What I seem to remember is some of the casings looked thicker and had these warty pimply bumps on them. I don't know if anyone else has noticed these things and don't know if they have anything to do with it but next time I see this I plan on keeping these separate to see if this has anything to do with it.
Butterbean, yes this is what I saw as well at the time, exactly as you described. Those could have been the tougher ones.
I'll keep this topic in mind and down the road if I see something similar again I'll take photos and post them.
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Post by Butterbean » Sat Oct 22, 2016 00:23

Bubba wrote:
Butterbean wrote:I made some a while back where some were tough and some were not. What I seem to remember is some of the casings looked thicker and had these warty pimply bumps on them. I don't know if anyone else has noticed these things and don't know if they have anything to do with it but next time I see this I plan on keeping these separate to see if this has anything to do with it.
Butterbean, yes this is what I saw as well at the time, exactly as you described. Those could have been the tougher ones.
I'll keep this topic in mind and down the road if I see something similar again I'll take photos and post them.
Thanks, I'll do the same. I don't know what those things are but the casings looked different and thicker. Be nice to be able to identify them before stuffing.
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Post by BlueMonkey » Tue Oct 25, 2016 07:21

Thanks All for your input and suggestions

I have just ordered some tubed casings, so will try those as making another batch this weekend

I will split the mix and warm smoke half, and then poach as suggested by Bubba.

It may have been the casings as they doid seem to have quite a "banana-ish"curve to them, suggesting there was not a lot of pliance.
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