Pig age appropriate for fermented sausages with starter cul?

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markizschnitzel
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Pig age appropriate for fermented sausages with starter cul?

Post by markizschnitzel » Fri Nov 02, 2018 12:00

When making fermented cold smoked sausages, I know that small farm bread and raised pigs of at least 1 year of age are enourmosly superior to a standard meat found at the average butcher, where I live (croatia, central europe). Those pigs are intensly raised for only around 6months, and the quality of the meat is much worse.

That said..

If I use a starter culture (which I am only now starting to learn about), would I get an acceptable end product?
If I get fat percentage right, and fermentation temps about right (i doubt I will manage ro make a fermenting chamber this year), would starter cultures be able to overcome some shortcommings of the meat?
fatboyz
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Post by fatboyz » Fri Nov 02, 2018 14:18

There's others here way more knowledgeable than me but I use similar meat all the time. I get barn clean out (smaller) pigs from the local Huterite colony. They are intensely barn raised as well. They are only about 6 months old and anywhere from 25-40 KG. Some times they're very lean so I need to add additional back or shoulder fat from a mature sow but the final product is excellent.
reddal
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Post by reddal » Sat Nov 10, 2018 14:04

Hi,

I mainly use outdoor reared, rare breed pigs of at least 10-12months old. However I've also used more intensively reared commercial pork.

There is definitely a difference - the intensively reared pork is much lighter in color and softer in consistency. I found the end product didn't have the same depth of flavor as compared to higher quality pork.

However the differences are subtle, and you can certainly make good products with the quality end of commercial pork. They often don't have much fat on them, so you may have to find an additional source of fat.

I don''t think starter cultures are relevant to the quality of the pork. You should use them for safety and the flavor impacts, regardless of what pork you use.

- reddal
markizschnitzel
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Post by markizschnitzel » Sun Nov 11, 2018 09:11

fatboyz wrote:There's others here way more knowledgeable than me but I use similar meat all the time. I get barn clean out (smaller) pigs from the local Huterite colony. They are intensely barn raised as well. They are only about 6 months old and anywhere from 25-40 KG. Some times they're very lean so I need to add additional back or shoulder fat from a mature sow but the final product is excellent.
Thanks Fatboy!

That is a different kind of a 6 months old, I think.. What I was referring to was 6 months old Landrace pig with 100-120 kg usually. So the rate of growth is much faster, which has me worried. I believe the meat has higher water content, if that is how it works..
reddal wrote: There is definitely a difference - the intensively reared pork is much lighter in color and softer in consistency. I found the end product didn't have the same depth of flavor as compared to higher quality pork.

However the differences are subtle, and you can certainly make good products with the quality end of commercial pork. They often don't have much fat on them, so you may have to find an additional source of fat.
Thanks Red!

I mean i was already set to try it, but a confirmation of sorts that a good product can be made is reassuring.

I believe my past failure with this meat was precisely the fat content. I did not pay much attention to it, which is why the sausages came out all wrinkly and full of holes. Low humidity was also likely a big factor, though the same sausages made with farm pigs came out OK-ish (not great), so probably fat content also makes susages less susceptible to quick drying out, because of the lower water content of fat, I'm guessing.

In any case, firm back fat is easily sourceable here, I can buy it in any butchers shop.
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