Hot Dogs "Bugle Dogs"

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Hot Dogs "Bugle Dogs"

Post by IdaKraut » Sun Jul 01, 2012 03:49

I've been itching to try out my new Kirby emulsifier blade that came with his mixer so decided to try Chuckwagon's Hobble Creek beef franks (http://www.wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.php?t=5079) recipe (with a few modifications).

I had some lean bull elk meat left in the freezer so decided to use it, thus the name for this sausage venture. Here's the recipe:

Lean elk meat: 4.25 lbs with beef fat added: 0.75 lbs, total of 5 lbs or 2.268 Kg

To above, add the following: Percent Wt. in gm or cc

Ice water (as in really, really cold) 10.00% 226.8 cc
Non-Fat dry milk powder 3.00% 68.0 g
Trehalose (since I plan to freeze the hot dogs) 2.50% 56.7 g
Kosher salt 1.94% 44.0 g
Dextrose (if not using Trehalose, increase to 0.8%) 0.30% 6.8 g
Yellow mustard, powder 0.61% 13.8 g
Paprika, sweet (I used Hungarian) 0.56% 12.7 g
Butcher-Packer special meat binder (phosphates) 0.50% 11.3 g
Cure #1 0.26% 6.0 g
MSG (Accent) 0.24% 5.4 g
Garlic, powder 0.12% 2.7 g
Coriander, powder 0.12% 2.7 g
Liquid smoke (I only use the one from Sausage Maker) 0.11% 2.5 cc
Celery seed, ground 0.083% 1.9 g
Sodium erythorbate 0.080% 1.8 g
Pepper, white, ground 0.053% 1.2 g
Pepper, black, ground 0.046% 1.0 g


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Here's a look at Kirby's stainless steel emulsifier blade which replaces the standard nylon mixer blade.

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Here I have the ground elk and beef fat with all dry ingredients added. I will add the liquid smoke and ice water after I quickly hand mix the dry ingredients into the ground meat before adding to the mixer/emulsifier bucket.

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Thermapen shows temperature at 36° F right before emulsifying.

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I ran the drill which powers the emsulsifier at high speed (1700 rpm) for about 45 seconds and then checked the results. The texture looked about right to me and the Thermapen showed a mear 5.9° rise in temperature. Not bad.

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I had rinsed and then soaked some 20-22mm sheep casings in cool water. Having these small diameter casings on a tube makes loading them onto the stuffer tube much easier.

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Showing my homemade link spacing thingamajig. I made it to help keep the link lengths somewhat the same length. I simply place the yellow plastic fins on the unlinked sausage and press gently which leaves nice creases that can then be squeezed with the fingers and twisted. Anyway, it works well and I use it for both franks and landjaegers. Spacing between fins is 6-1/4".

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Smoke started after the dogs hang in the smoker without smoke at 120° F for an hour to dry out the casings. Temperature then gradually increased to 165° over about 5 hours. I had pecan smoke going for 4 hours during that time using the wonderful A-MAZE-N-PELLET-SMOKER(AMNPS). I thought I only loaded 2 to 3 hours worth of pellets but it turned out smoking for 4 hours before I decided that was enough smoke. Final internal meat temp was 150° F.

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Fresh out of the smoker and ready for an ice bath until thoroughly cooled. Then allowed to bloom for a little over an hour at room temperature before hitting the fridge overnight.

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Good eats! I must say these turned out the best franks to date. They remind me of the great hot dogs I used to get back in NJ as a kid many years ago. The natural casings have that great snap to them which skinless dogs will never have. I like them best when poached in water. The 4 hours of smoke did not overpower them at all. Chuckwagon, thanks for providing a great recipe that I modified a bit to meet my desires. Your spice combo and amounts are spot on.

Addendum: The next time I will increase the ice water to 12% and use a bit more fat in the meat mix (maybe 20-22%). Also, I will only keep the links in the smoker at 120° F while the smoke is going and then move the links to my homemade sous vide poacher to finish them in hot water. I think this will make the franks a bit juicier and plump.
Last edited by IdaKraut on Sat Nov 04, 2017 15:12, edited 2 times in total.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sun Jul 01, 2012 04:31

Very nice Rudy! I really like the texture and the color. I was happy to hear there was no overpowering of smoke flavor. You've made some great modifications and I'll bet those doggies are really tasty. Congrats!

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
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Post by redzed » Sun Jul 01, 2012 07:47

What a nice bunch of franks! And you can eat them knowing exactly what's in them!
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Post by crustyo44 » Sun Jul 01, 2012 12:22

Rudy,
You've done a great job, I am very interested in the kirby emulsifier, the end result is well worth it.
Trehalose? Why do you use it to freeze the franks? I like to learn something.
Regards,
Jan.
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Post by NorCal Kid » Sun Jul 01, 2012 15:36

Good looking franks there, Rudy! I like both the color & the final texture you achieved!

I'm now inspired to make some again! :grin:

Watch out with that stainless Kirby blade-those suckers are SHARP!
I've not emulsified with it YET, but now that I've seen the results, it will happen!

Jan, the stainless-steel blade replaces the hard plastic blade in the kirby mixer (shown below). very quick & effective method to mix meat batches...
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About 10 pounds loaded in...
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Power appled. Wimpy cordless drills need not be considered... :wink:
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Well-mixed, not emulsified here...
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Kevin
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Post by IdaKraut » Sun Jul 01, 2012 16:51

Kevin, thanks for jumping in and explaining the Kirby mixer better than I could. The emulsifier blade is indeed sharp and needs to be respected. Your drill will not handle emulsifying, trust me. Even my heavy duty Harbor Freight monster (here's the one I use: http://www.harborfreight.com/compact-2- ... 97622.html )was moaning under the strain; that's why I will increase the ice water amount the next time. Plus, I would use pork back fat instead of beef fat since I think it gives a juicer product and is easier to emulsify. The Kirby does a great job for what it costs. I have an antique Hobart buffalo chopper which does a better job, but the thing weighs about 200 lbs and takes me over an hour to clean and sanitize after use. The Kirby takes mere minutes.

Jan, Trehalose is a natural occurring disaccharide that is manufactured commercially by a Japanese company for the food industry. Added to sausage that will be frozen, it will help to maintain water weight, prevent damage after freeze/thaw cycles, reduce discoloration and off flavors and maintains more of a freshly cooked or smoked flavor and color. More details can be derived from here: http://www.hayashibara-intl.com/food/do ... EB_000.pdf It is about half as sweet as sucrose. When I use Treha trehalose, I decrease the dextrose amount by ¼ to compensate for this sweetness.
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Post by IdaKraut » Sun Jul 01, 2012 19:56

Here's another read on the use of Trehalose: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_g ... n56870167/

Thanks go to Kirby Campbell, who makes the mixer/emulsifier.
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Post by Big Guy » Sun Jul 01, 2012 20:36

Where can I get a Kirby ?
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Post by IdaKraut » Sun Jul 01, 2012 21:08

Big Guy wrote:Where can I get a Kirby ?
Unfortunately, he has no website. I learned about his products on the bradley smoker forums. Email him at: Kirby_campbell@yahoo.com and he will email you the specs and prices.
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Post by Big Guy » Mon Jul 02, 2012 03:29

Thanks e-mailed him and now we will wait for a reply.
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Post by Big Guy » Mon Jul 02, 2012 19:22

Its on order :mrgreen:
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Post by IdaKraut » Mon Jul 02, 2012 21:13

Chuckwagon wrote:Very nice Rudy! I really like the texture and the color. I was happy to hear there was no overpowering of smoke flavor. You've made some great modifications and I'll bet those doggies are really tasty. Congrats!

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Thanks for the kind words master. I have you to thank. I would like to increase the moisture level and am not sure which way to go. Should I go with pork fat instead of beef? Or should I increase the water? Right now these franks are great as long as you poach them in hot water but they seem dry if done on the grill. I hate those store-bought dogs (Nathan's comes to mind) that probably have 30% or more water added to them. You can cook them anyway you want and they still are not too dry. Give me old fashioned franks any day and I'll be happy.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Jul 03, 2012 03:07

Hi Rudy, Thanks for your eleemosynary confabulation! :shock: It's much appreciated. If you add fat, by all means, use only pork fat - it`s where the flavor is! However, it`s important to understand that fat does not add moisture to a sausage. Fat contains far less water than meat, and it actually allows sausages to dry much faster. On the other hand, fat keeps meat lubricated and as we chew, our senses must realize a particular "mouth feel" as not being too dry. The "lubrication" effect in good sausage is crucial.

The problem of moisture in your Bugle Dogs is not necessarily one of water volume; it could be a problem of water retention. Many "smoked-cooked-cured" sausages lose moisture with applied heat during the preparation phase in the smokehouse. This is one reason we cook "low and slow" during prep, as the loss of moisture is kept to a minimum. Yet, we find a point in the process where much moisture is simply evaporated. To combat the effects of elevated heat and consequential loss of moisture, some sausage makers use sodium tripolyphosphate or sodium diphosphateSDP in their sausages to raise the pH acidity, directly increasing their water-holding capacity. Both phosphates are alkaline pH>7.0 when placed in meat of pH6.0. Here`s what happens: The salt in your recipe forces meat proteins to swell. This swelling helps proteins trap and hold more water. Whenever sodium tripolyphosphate or sodium diphosphateSDP phosphates are added, proteins can hold even more water because they change their basic molecular structure, or `unlock` it...if you will. As a result, even more water is retained. Phosphates are used by virtually all commercial producers and laws in most countries allow up to 0.5% phosphates (5 grams per kilogram of meat). Phosphates are the strongest water-binders modern science has recognized or Mother Nature has produced. However, although legal, their use remains controversial and in some circles, even highly argumentative. For instance, allow me to quote a single sentence from, "New Aspects Of Inorganic Polyphosphate Metabolism And Function" by Igor Kulaev, Vladimir Vagabov and Tatiana Kulakovskaya, where they write: "Some aspects of the biochemistry of high-molecular PolyPs are considered to be of great significance to the approach to biotechnological, ecological and medical problems".

The product you used, known as "special meat binder", is available to home sausage makers, and it is nothing more than sodium tripolyphosphate or sodium diphosphateSDP (phosphates) and several of our members use it. I choose not to. And the controversy continues.

Rudy, if you are really unhappy with the texture, would you describe it a little more? It looks quite moist in your photo, but only a big bite will tell the truth. Is the mouthfeel texture dry and crumbly? The problem might be as simple as the size of the meat particles - another topic altogether. :wink:

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Last edited by Chuckwagon on Tue Jul 03, 2012 04:48, edited 2 times in total.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by pikeman_95 » Tue Jul 03, 2012 04:26

Hi Rudy
I thought I had better get to know some of the members on this forum. From what you say they are a good bunch of guys. I just joined a few minutes ago so hi all.
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Post by Baconologist » Tue Jul 03, 2012 06:31

All-beef franks rock!
I grew up on kosher beef franks!
Add some brisket fat if you can get it.
Godspeed!

Bob
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