Pickles!

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StefanS
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Post by StefanS » Thu Aug 11, 2016 16:52

I would like to refresh that old topic instead to start a new one. It is cucumber season right now so I have made some preparation for winter time and would like to share with you how it looks like. So old polish way (my Mather) I have prepared cucumber in brine - first picture - one week old jars, second picture - yesterday made.
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These cucumbers in brine can be made in two ways.
1. with cold salt solution - I'm sealing airtight jars after 4-5 days or:
2. using boiling salt solution - sealing tight jars without waiting.

Any over grow, not nice shape cucumbers i'm using to make:
shredded cucumbers for soup
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sandwich Swedish sliced sweet cucumbers
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cucumber, carrot, onion salad
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dill pickles
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as today - left overs of fresh cucumbers - I have prepared half sour cucumbers - they will be good after 36 hours and will last 3-5 days only ( that good )
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Whole process for making cucumbers in brine is very simple - 1.5 table spoon of salt (not jodonized)per 1 liter of water plus dill, garlic, piece of horseradish root (also can be added leaf of tart cherry or oak).
Dill pickles, or other cucumbers are also simple but there are specific recipes.
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Thu Aug 11, 2016 17:42

They all look great Stephan! The half sour are my favorite! Once a year fresh season like tomatoes!! .......as least for us in the North East

Hmm, the Oak leaves contain tannins that are astringent, helps to keep crisp or for flavor? I sometimes add grape leaves that seem to add a bit more crunch.
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StefanS
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Post by StefanS » Fri Aug 12, 2016 00:34

Bob K wrote:helps to keep crisp or for flavor?
just for crisp. some poles using also black currant leaves, grapes leaves you already mention, some add horseradish leaves. Everyone has own recipe for cucumbers. It is just polish way to preserve them for winter.
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Post by gibletdinner » Sun Aug 14, 2016 08:13

Your post inspired me to create an account on this site. I've got a few pickles going but nothing like this. Looks great!
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Post by Lance Link » Sun Aug 14, 2016 15:06

Nice looking pickles. I have been trying to ferment some in a crock and the results have not been as good as I expected. The first batch I let sit for 2 weeks. One of the cukes turned to mush, but the others were fine. No bad smells but the brine was slightly cloudy. These were done in a crock. The taste seems very heavy on the dill. I used 4 fresh dill heads for this 1 gallon batch. I started a second batch in a 2 gallon crock 4 weeks ago and will check those today. The first batch I put in jars and then into the fridge. Wondering if the slightly cloudy brine is a problem.
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StefanS
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Post by StefanS » Sun Aug 14, 2016 20:32

hi Lance. I will try to answer some of your questions and will try to give you some ideas for future preparations.

(One of the cukes turned to mush) - two reasons on my mind - 1. already infected by fungus, or 2. not cover in brine
(I used 4 fresh dill heads for this 1 gallon batch) - much too much (about 4 times less)
( Wondering if the slightly cloudy brine is a problem.) perfectly good and normal.
Because you mentioned that you are using your crock - is it air tight? I'm using also crock sometimes but it is this one http://www.sausagemaker.com/German-Styl ... 4-1413.htm Any pickles should not be allowed to contact with fresh air (oxygen). Important is weight to keep cucumbers below solution line. Important is fermenting temperature (14-18*C/~60F). There is many factors that you should consider to make a great pickles.
Last edited by StefanS on Mon Aug 15, 2016 00:22, edited 1 time in total.
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Mon Aug 15, 2016 14:31

Stefan-
Are you making the half-dones on the counter or in the refrigerator?
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StefanS
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Post by StefanS » Mon Aug 15, 2016 18:32

Bob K wrote:Are you making the half-dones on the counter or in the refrigerator?
First 24-36 hours over counter, then next 3-5 days in refrigerator (after that time I don't need worry because there none left)
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Post by Lance Link » Tue Aug 16, 2016 02:09

StefanS wrote:hi Lance. I will try to answer some of your questions and will try to give you some ideas for future preparations.

(One of the cukes turned to mush) - two reasons on my mind - 1. already infected by fungus, or 2. not cover in brine
(I used 4 fresh dill heads for this 1 gallon batch) - much too much (about 4 times less)
( Wondering if the slightly cloudy brine is a problem.) perfectly good and normal.
Because you mentioned that you are using your crock - is it air tight? I'm using also crock sometimes but it is this one http://www.sausagemaker.com/German-Styl ... 4-1413.htm Any pickles should not be allowed to contact with fresh air (oxygen). Important is weight to keep cucumbers below solution line. Important is fermenting temperature (14-18*C/~60F). There is many factors that you should consider to make a great pickles.
Thanks for the reply. The first batch was submerged the whole time and I use a crock with an airlock and weights. Must have been a bad cuke. The second batch (twice as big) has the same taste, however after 4 weeks the skins are like leather. I used a recipe published by the University of MN. Most recipes I've seen call for the same amount of dill. I guess I need to cut back(?) The only difference in the second batch is the addition of about a dozen fresh cayenne peppers for a little heat.
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StefanS
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Post by StefanS » Sun Aug 21, 2016 22:10

Lance Link wrote:I used a recipe published by the University of MN
never crossed that one so can not share my opinion
Lance Link wrote: however after 4 weeks the skins are like leather
probably there were overgrown, oversized cucumbers
Today I would like to present two recipes for half sour cucumbers presented in Polish website http://wedlinydomowe.pl/forum/topic/132 ... małosolne/ - by Maxwell :
4 Lb. cucumbers
3 Quarts of water
4 Tablespoon of salt (coarse Kosher - 5 Tbsp.)
2-3 whole dill (with seeds)
2" of horseradish root
5-6 claves of fresh garlic
Jar - minimum 1 gallon with lid
Cucumbers should washed in cold water ( If they are not fresh they should stay in cold water for 4 hours), garlic skinless sliced, horseradish skinless, sliced in 3-4 pieces. on bottom of jar put 1 dill, piece of horseradish, 2-3 sliced cloves of garlic. Fill first layer of cucumbers (white top up), then dill, horseradish, garlic, then another layer of cukies and rest of dill, garlic, horseradish. You can add oak leave, cherry leave also.
Heat water to point of boiling then add salt. After dissolve of salt fill up jar with boiling solution to filling over cukies. Close jar with lid and band without making it tight. Cover jar with towel to keep it warm as possible for 20 hours. After 24 hours they are ready to be eaten. After that time, keeping them in refrigerator will almost stop process of fermenting.

In entry #4 Papcio posted very interesting recipe to make a half dones without water. ( I have never yet try it).
1 kg of fresh small cucumbers
2" piece of horseradish, skinless, sliced in few smaller pieces
1-2 leaves of oak, or cherry, or black currant
4-5 cloves of garlic, sliced
2-3 crushed Allspices
1-2 Bayleaves
1 teaspoon of yellow mustard seeds
1-2 branches of dill with seeds (or 1/2 teaspoon of dill seed)
2 teaspoon of no iodized salt
Cucumbers should be fresh, washed, having both end sliced off. Put everything in Ziplock 1 gal bag, salt on top. Shake them well and squeeze bag to take out air as possible. After closing keep it in refrigerator for 4 hours. Next 24 hours keep bag in room temperature. After that they are ready to eat.
Enjoy Polish taste!
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Mon Aug 22, 2016 01:05

Stefan you are the Pickle King! Image Thanks for translating and posting the additional pickle recipes.
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Post by Lance Link » Sat Sep 03, 2016 22:11

Thanks for the recipes and advice, Stefan. This is the UM recipe. http://www.extension.umn.edu/food/food- ... le-recipe/
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Pickles!

Post by Bob K » Sat Jul 29, 2017 14:49

Well it getting to be that time of year again! StefanS got me going with his half-sours last year and he was right they don't last long.

Question on making Dill slices: Ferment whole, then slice and can or can they be fermented sliced?
Or is it better to just make an unfermented version.
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Butterbean
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Post by Butterbean » Sat Jul 29, 2017 19:24

Matter of taste I think. IMO, the best pickles are not fermented but made like vlasic pickles. Next is just plain canned dill pickles then fermented. That's just me though.

Being you'll be making pickles shortly I have a something on my bucket list I'd like to propose to you to make.

First, pickle some extra large cucumbers - cold pickle I think would be best and they need to be whole - and large.

Once you've made the pickles make some hotdog weiners. Once you have these made take an apple corer and core out the middle of the pickle and insert a weiner into the pickle. Once you've done that, stick a stick in weiner then stick a toothpick through the base of the pickle and the weiner to hold in place. Next dip this in corndog batter then deep fry the corn dog till the batter is done.

Then tell me what it tastes like. This is on my bucket list of things to do. Have seen it and it looks incredible.
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Post by Bob K » Sun Jul 30, 2017 14:22

Hot dog in a pickle EH - Ran that past the wife and she wants to know what else you have growing in the middle of the cornfield.

I have to agree on the refrigerated type pickles
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