Kiełbasa Swojska

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redzed
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Post by redzed » Mon Aug 07, 2017 16:07

Thanks BB. The sausage did turn out well and one reason for the good bind was the inclusion of the beef and Class III pork, the latter mainly darker pork meat from near the bone with connective tissue. Finely ground separately from the other meats, mixed really well with water and then combined with everything else. acts as the glue and no additional "binders" are needed.
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Post by StefanS » Mon Aug 07, 2017 16:19

Chris - Where I can get some paint You have used for that kielbasa?? :lol: it looks perfect.
curing the meat for two days prior to working it
- Butterbean - it is standard procedure for polish kind of kielbasa.....
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Post by Butterbean » Tue Aug 08, 2017 02:02

StefanS wrote:Chris - Where I can get some paint You have used for that kielbasa?? :lol: it looks perfect.
curing the meat for two days prior to working it
- Butterbean - it is standard procedure for polish kind of kielbasa.....
I agree. I often get in a hurry and rush things and skip this but I think it makes a big difference. Trying to do better. :oops:
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Post by Sleebus » Tue Aug 08, 2017 14:36

Looking very nice and good info on the procedure too. Will have to put that into practice on the next batch I do.
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Wed Aug 09, 2017 16:02

By curing the meat for 48 hours before making our sausages we take full advantage of what nitrite does when it is mixed with meat. Nitrite is more than a preservative and there is a lot more happening than giving us the colour and protection from botulism. The recipes and advice that we generally get here, and that is to grind, add the Cure #1, stuff set for an hour, smoke, is flawed. Nitrite reacts with numerous building blocks of the meat muscle, the myoglobins, lipids and proteins, changing their structure. A portion of the nitrite is even converted into nitrate and then back to nitrite and eventually into nitric oxide. Naturally occurring nitrate reductase bacteria also go into action, especially if additional sugar is added. All this affects the flavour, smell, consistency and water holding capacity of the final product, and it cannot be accomplished in an hour. And once the sausage is subjected to heat then all this activity is halted.
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Post by Butterbean » Wed Aug 09, 2017 17:31

I agree. Every time I make the extra effort and don't rush things the sausages are always better and the more I learn the more I'm convinced the older methods are much better than the newer methods.

I also think there is a valid argument to go back to using saltpeter. Not for everyone for sure but I do believe it would make a difference.
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Post by wkw » Wed Aug 09, 2017 19:26

Hi Chris
In your instructions you say to smoke for 90 mins at 135-140f, then raise the temp to 160f and finish at 180f for 20-30 mins.

How long do you keep the smoker at 160f?

Thanks
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Post by redzed » Thu Aug 10, 2017 06:59

In that particular case I think it was a little over an hour, but since we are bringing the sausage to the final IT in the smoker, it's difficult to give the same advice to everyone, since we all have different smokers and how much sausage is loaded and the ambient temps also come into play. I now finish most of my sausages by poaching, that is, smoke for a couple of hours at 135, then for an hour or a bit longer at 150 and then poach to the desired IT. That way all my sausages are evenly cooked are more plump looking and have a softer and more peelable casing.
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Post by martin » Fri Aug 11, 2017 01:21

Nice swojska.
Redzed i have some trimmings ( mizdra) from whole pork lion , so what you think , can i use this meats( with some fat) like class3 or class2 , i have always problem how to use this trimmings in sausage.
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Post by harleykids » Fri Aug 11, 2017 04:56

Chris,

When you talk about cubing the meat, then mixing in the salt and cure and refrigerating for 48 hours so that the cure can do it's job, can you also use this appoach/method on salumi?

And then add the starter culture after the grind, after you add the spices right before casing?

Thx
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Post by redzed » Fri Aug 11, 2017 16:06

martin wrote:Nice swojska.
Redzed i have some trimmings ( mizdra) from whole pork lion , so what you think , can i use this meats( with some fat) like class3 or class2 , i have always problem how to use this trimmings in sausage.
The "mizdra" is the membrane or silverskin that covers almost the entire pork loin and I think it falls under Class 4. Sometimes it is quite thick so it's best used in products where we use cooked meat like liver sausages. If I have time I scrape all the meat off it and just throw it away, or if it is not too thick, throw it into the Class 3 trimmings from the loin, grind it through the 3mm plate and add it to sausages like my swojska, or to emulsified sausages.
harleykids wrote:Chris,

When you talk about cubing the meat, then mixing in the salt and cure and refrigerating for 48 hours so that the cure can do it's job, can you also use this appoach/method on salumi?

And then add the starter culture after the grind, after you add the spices right before casing?

Thx
Yes I now almost always do that, add the salt, cure and sugar and refrigerate for a couple of days. The meat firms up and you have much nicer grind. Add the culture right at the start of the mix together with the other ingredients. That way the bacteria will be distributed evenly throughout the farce. The salt is already well distributed in the meat by thast time, so it will not affect the starter.
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Post by martin » Mon Aug 14, 2017 20:19

Thanks
I wrong call the mizdra,i was thinking about trimmings form pork lion,darker meat and some fat ,I think that I polish is called warkocz.
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Post by redzed » Tue Aug 15, 2017 05:21

martin wrote:Thanks
I wrong call the mizdra,i was thinking about trimmings form pork lion,darker meat and some fat ,I think that I polish is called warkocz.
Translated literally, "warkocz" is "braid" in English. Here we refer to the part of the loin that was attached to the ribs. And if trim it off the loin in one piece, the the regular pattern of fat and connective tissue intertwined between the meat resembles a braid. While I am familiar wit the term as it is used often in Polish meat terminology, I don't know what the English equivalent is. :oops:

So to answer your original question, yes the "warkocz" is Class III and ground through the 3mm plate a very good addition to sausage.
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Post by bolepa » Fri Sep 15, 2017 14:04

redzed,

Your Kiełbasa Swojska looked so good so from your picks... I pulled the trigger and made 8# of it last weekend. I followed step by step and word by word your recipe and the process. The final result is.... absolutely delicious, very testy kielbasa. 8# of kielbasa is gone by now and my relatives and friends (including myself) are asking for more :-). This recipe is on my permanent list of what to do next. Thank you for sharing!
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Post by Bob K » Fri Sep 15, 2017 15:18

Which version did you make?
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