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Bio Cultures by Chr. Hansen
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Chuckwagon 
Senior Moderator



United States

Age: 66
Joined: 06 Apr 2010
Posts: 4501
Location: Rocky Mountains
Posted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 07:53   Bio Cultures by Chr. Hansen

Hi Sausage Makers! Have you tried bio-cultures in your fermented sausages such as salami of all types, and any other air dried products?

Bactoferm™ is a trade mark of Chr. Hansen... and it is the very best! I've used it many times and highly recommend it.

Meat Starter Culture Bactoferm™ LHP (Fast: 5.0 pH in 2 days)
LHP is a freeze-dried culture well suited for all fermented sausages where a relatively pronounced acidification is desired. This culture is recommended for the production of traditional fermented, dry sausages with a sourly flavor note.
Each 42-gram packet of LHP will treat 500 pounds (225 kilo) of meat. You can use half of the packet in 100 pounds of meat, and refreeze remaining culture.
Note: Cultures must be stored in a freezer and have a shelf life of 14 days unrefrigerated or 6 months frozen.

Meat Starter Culture Bactoferm™ F-RM-52 (Medium: 5.0 pH in 4 days)
Bactoferm™ F-RM-52 is a freeze-dried culture well suited for all fermented sausages where a relatively fast acidification is desired. The culture is recommended for the production of traditional North European types of fermented, dry sausages with a sourly flavor note.
Each 25-gram packet of Bactoferm™ F-RM-52 will treat 220 pounds (100 kilo) of meat. You can use the whole packet in 100 pounds of meat or use half of the packet and refreeze remaining culture.
Note: Cultures must be stored in a freezer and have a shelf life of 14 days unrefrigerated or 6 months frozen.

Meat Starter Culture Bactoferm™ T-SPX (Slow: Assists with drying a month or more) Also: Semi Dry Cured
Bactoferm™ T-SPX is a freeze-dried culture well suited for all fermented sausages where a relatively mild acidification is desired. T-SPX is particularly recommended for the production of Southern European type of sausages, low in acidity with an aromatic flavor. The culture is suitable for moulded as well as smoked fermented sausages. (Semi Dry Cured)
Each 25-gram packet of Bactoferm™ T-SPX will treat 440 pounds (200 kilo) of meat. You can use the whole packet in 100 pounds of meat or use half of the packet and refreeze remaining culture.
Note: Cultures must be stored in a freezer and have a shelf life of 14 days unrefrigerated or 6 months frozen.

Mold Culture - Bactoferm:Mold 600 (Previously M-EK-4)
Meat culture for production of moulded dried sausages with a white/cream coloured appearance. Mold-600 is a single strain culture containing spores of Penicillium nalgiovense in a convenient freeze-dried form.
P. nalgiovense is a fast growing, traditional white mold culture for controlling the surface flora.
Mold-600 is particularly recommended for the production of traditional sausages dried at low temperature and/or low humidity.
Mold-600 suppresses the growth of undesirable organisms such as indigenous molds, yeasts and bacteria. The culture has a positive effect on the drying process by preventing the emergence of a dry rim. Furthermore, the mold degrades lactic acid during maturation resulting in a pH increase and a less sourish flavor.
Note: Cultures must be stored in a freezer and have a shelf life of 14 days unrefrigerated or 6 months frozen.

Bactoferm™ F-LC (Short or Traditional Fermentation Time / Also: Added Listeria protection)
Bactoferm™ F-LC meat culture with bioprotective properties for production of fermented sausages with short or traditional production times. F-LC is recommended for the production of all types of fermented sausages. Depending on fermentation temperature, acidification is either traditional, fast or extra fast. F-LC is a mixed culture containing Pediococcus acidilactici, Lactobacillus curvatus and Staphylococcus xylosus in a convenient freeze-dried form. P. acidilactici ensures reliable acidification whereas S. xylosus results in strong flavor development and a good, stable color. Due to bacteriocin production both L. curvatus and P. acidilactici contribute to suppressing growth of Listeria monocytogenes.
Each 25-gram packet of Bactoferm™ F-LC will treat 220 pounds (100 kilo) of meat. You may use the whole packet in 100 pounds of meat or use half of the packet and refreeze remaining culture.

Other favorite Bactoferm™ cultures include:

Cultures for fermentation below 75˚F. (24˚C.)
T-RM-53……Slow (European style)
T-SP
T-SPX
T-D-66………Intermediate
T-SC-150
T-SL

Cultures for fermentation from 70˚- 90˚F. (22˚- 32˚C.)
F-RM-52……..Medium (American style)
F-RM-7
F-SC-111
F-1
FLC (with Listeria protection)
LP……………...Fast
LL-1
CSL
LL-2
F-2

Culture for fermentation from 80˚- 100˚F. (26˚- 38˚C.)
LHP…………...Extra Fast

Culture for fermentation from 86˚- 115˚F. (30˚- 45˚C.)
CSB…………...Extra Fast
F-PA

Culture for fermentation from 90˚- 115˚F. (32˚- 45˚C.)
HPS…………...Extra Fast

I’ve found these cultures to be most reliable. Herein lies the future of safe, uniform, and convenient sausage making! If you’d like to know more, please contact me via pm @ Chuckwagon. I'm always happy to help anyone interested, especially beginners.

Best wishes,
Chuckwagon
_________________
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
Last edited by Chuckwagon on Sat Apr 05, 2014 01:54; edited 3 times in total  
 
   
uwanna61 
Passionate


United States

Age: 53
Joined: 15 May 2011
Posts: 361
Location: Vermont
Posted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 01:19   

Heads up folks CW graciously posted this info! This is valuable if anyone has a question on what culture to use and how they work for your next salami project.

Thanks big guy :wink:
 
   
gurkanyeniceri 
Beginner



Australia

Age: 40
Joined: 26 Jul 2011
Posts: 18
Location: Canberra
Posted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 05:11   

Just so that the people living in Australia know:

I talked to CHR Hansen rep and got this info:

http://www.mblsa.com.au is selling some cultures mentioned above but we as the Australian sausage makers can not get Bactoferm 600 as CHR does not import any mould cultures. Just another industry regulation like we can not use raw milk in cheese production.

He also sent me a pdf called "Bactoferm Meat Manual Vol.1" along with F1 culture specifications. If anyone interested I can ask to Chuckwagon to put these somewhere to download.
_________________
Cheers,

Gurkan Yeniceri
 
   
Siara 
Frequent User


Belgium

Joined: 30 Jan 2006
Posts: 139
Location: Belgia/Płock
Posted: Fri Oct 14, 2011 06:43   

Here are the links:

https://rapidshare.com/files/544828531/F-1_PI_EN_vs2_Jul_04.pdf
https://rapidshare.com/files/2260650542/CHR_Hansen_Meat_manual_.pdf
_________________
"W życiu piękne są tylko chwile"
Pozdrawiam
Siara
 
   
ursula 
Passionate


Australia

Age: 57
Joined: 28 Jul 2012
Posts: 303
Location: country victoria
Posted: Mon May 06, 2013 08:47   

Hi,Just a question along the lines of this thread. I notice in Marianski that most fermented sausages use T-SPX and F-LC cultures.
I can only find F-1 and F-RM 7 here in Oz, and am wondering if they are interchangeable at all, or are they specific to the taste of the sausages. Or is it just a question of the temperature of fermentation. Do they even affect the taste of the sausage?Just a bit confused.
Ursula
 
   
Chuckwagon 
Senior Moderator



United States

Age: 66
Joined: 06 Apr 2010
Posts: 4501
Location: Rocky Mountains
Posted: Tue May 07, 2013 11:12   

Hi Ursula,
Traditionally, in Europe, pediococcus cerevisiae has been used at relatively lower temperatures which have resulted in a much milder flavor than those products made using other lactobacilli. In 1957 the micrococcus bacterium was introduced. During the 1960’s, even more curing strains were placed on the market and staphylococcus carnosus is still widely used today. In 1966, the first universal and most practical lactic acid bacteria for use in sausage was introduced by a developer by the name of Nurmi. This is the workhorse called lactobacillus plantarum which is used at moderate temperatures. Then in the 1970’s, “wondercures” were made by combining lactic acid bacteria and curing bacteria. These “multi-strain” cultures not only ferment meat, they also develop color and flavor, as well as fighting off undesirable bacteria. Each culture on Chr.Hansen’s list has a specific property and a unique “profile”. Each has its own recommended fermentation temperature. Most are hetero-fermentative (meaning they not only produce lactic acid by metabolizing carbohydrates, but they also create many different reactions as well – sometimes producing unpleasant odors.) In opposition, starter cultures producing lactic acid only, are called “homo-fermentative” cultures.
In the laboratory, each culture is developed for a uniquely precise effect and yes, each will produce a product having its unique flavor profile although it may be similar to others. Merely one gram of any specific lactic acid culture may contain tens of millions of bacterial cells ensuring domination over undesirable microorganisms.
You asked if the cultures affect the taste of the sausage. They absolutely do. Because each culture specifically derives its own fermentation contour, each culture will affect flavor more than any other feature.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
_________________
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
 
   
ursula 
Passionate


Australia

Age: 57
Joined: 28 Jul 2012
Posts: 303
Location: country victoria
Posted: Wed May 08, 2013 09:38   

Thank you, Chuckwagon for taking the time to reply. You are a wealth of information.(Where do you learn all this stuff, and how do you have the time?!)
I guess my next step is to source F-L-C. In the meantime there are plenty of fermented sausages to make with T-SPX.
Warm wishes Ursula
 
   
Chuckwagon 
Senior Moderator



United States

Age: 66
Joined: 06 Apr 2010
Posts: 4501
Location: Rocky Mountains
Posted: Wed May 08, 2013 09:57   

You are most welcome, sweet girl. How are your parents and did you finish your smoker? Please be sure to take some photos of the Teewurst-making process. There are many folks VERY interested in the procedure. Good luck. I can just imagine that your Dad will go nuts over this stuff eh?

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
_________________
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
 
   
ursula 
Passionate


Australia

Age: 57
Joined: 28 Jul 2012
Posts: 303
Location: country victoria
Posted: Thu May 09, 2013 09:09   

Hi Chuckwagon,
Thank you for your kind thoughts. My parents are well and are coming over for a bonfire and lunch tomorrow ( yes, sausages!) I am organising them to fly business to Germany for a final time in the home country later this year.
Meanwhile my cute little Teewursts are smoking happily away in the smoker. The door is fixed and all operating well.
I have just ordered a Harks Electric smoker as a supplement so I can make EVERYTHING!
Isn't life great!!
Ursula
 
   
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