Chicken Wangs

Devo
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Chicken Wangs

Post by Devo » Mon Mar 19, 2012 22:35

Need to make my lunch for work tonight so I thought wings would be good :grin:

Here they are getting two hours of cold smoke in the bradley
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Cold smoking is over and into the racks with a sprite of lite oil and salt and pepper
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In the big easy using the Tommy ring and some more pellets on the side for extra smoke
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Starting to brown up
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Here you can hear them sizzling away :mrgreen:
http://youtu.be/x5MINB5WA7c

All done in about 40 minutes
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And plated up. The ones one left got some extra hot spices :o and the ones on the right are salt and pepper
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Post by DLFL » Mon Mar 19, 2012 23:06

Those look like lunch!!!!!
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Post by two_MN_kids » Tue Mar 20, 2012 01:02

Those look GREAT, Devo.
Never seen anything like that Tommy Ring. I'm going to have to research that. It looks very interesting.

Jim
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Post by Devo » Tue Mar 20, 2012 01:17

A Tommy ring is just a springform pan with the bottom taken out. put it in the bottom of you cooker and put wood chips, pellets around the outside of it so the IR heats it up and makes smoke. The Tommy ring keeps the wood pellets on the sides of the chamber and keeps them smoking. Now if you have a Big Easy then you will need a 9" x 3 in tall pan, if you have an SRG or the Costco 25lb unit then a 10 or an 11 in will be perfect.
Just go to any cake store or baking supply company and ask for a cake ring or a spring form pan, either one will work but I prefer the cake ring since they are made of stainless steel and not aluminum.
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Post by ssorllih » Tue Mar 20, 2012 01:54

I could eat three or two of those. They look great.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Mar 20, 2012 04:34

Hi Devo,
Are you placing raw chicken directly into the smoker without a curing solution?
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Devo » Tue Mar 20, 2012 05:09

Chuckwagon wrote:Hi Devo,
Are you placing raw chicken directly into the smoker without a curing solution?
Hi chuckee

The wings go into the smoker raw. The cabinet temp for cold smoking on my smoker never goes over 55*F this time of the year. Cold smoke=cold cabinet
Than they are placed into the TBE @ 580*F + till internal temp reach's 160*F +
So no curing solution, besides almost every chick these days are injected with some kind of crap.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Mar 20, 2012 09:18

Hi Devo. Please don`t misunderstand. Part of my job is trying to keep everyone around here healthy and alive. The following information might surprise many readers. I believe it is most important:

Most pathogenic bacteria, including Salmonella, Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Campylobacter, can be fairly easily destroyed using a mild cooking process. Sure, maintaining a minimum temperature within the range of 130-165° F (54 -74° C) for a specific amount of time will kill them. However, cooking will not destroy these toxins once they have formed in food.

Moreover, in the case of clostridium botulinum, although the microorganism itself may rapidly destroyed by heat, as in thorough cooking, it should be remembered that the spores which produce the toxin are heat-tolerant and will survive even boiling at 212° F (100° C) for an extended period of time.

I think you should know that I received some sarcastic email from an anonymous person regarding my post. I simply asked, "Are you placing raw chicken directly into the smoker without a curing solution?"

Some anonymous "backshooter" with no guts to even offer the courtesy to identify himself, thought he`d really "straighten out ol` Chuckwagon" by letting me know that, "it sure sounds like they were cooked at a temp not requiring cure". This anonymous mouse not only displays indisputable ignorance, but a general lack of "cajones" as well.

I`m truly sorry if I offended anyone but I`d be more sorry to see someone become sick or even die from a lack of knowledge when a little Cure #1 would solve the problem.

The problem we have at Wedliny Domowe is that I cannot leave the post "as is" where someone could possibly become affected. If you would like to organize a few sentences recommending the use of Cure#1 in a brine, I would be happy to amend your post. Otherwise, I`m afraid it cannot remain "as is" where someone might become ill. Sorry. :cry:

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Last edited by Chuckwagon on Wed Apr 11, 2012 22:38, edited 1 time in total.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Devo » Tue Mar 20, 2012 10:41

Hey chuck it really surprise's me that you recommend cure number one when BBQing. This is not smoking one O one it's BBqing one O one. In my 40+ years I have never heard of such a thing. I have to ask you when you cook chicken in your oven do you add cure? I really think you should do some research on just what a big easy is and the high temp it cooks at. To give you a fast run down it is a grease less fryer and cure is not needed at such high temps.

Safe - No hot oil to burn, splatter or spill.
Easy - No expensive oil to purchase, clean-up or recycle.
Char-Broil's infrared oil-less turkey fryer is the safe way to fry your turkey. And because it uses NO oil, it's healthier, too.
Safely cook a turkey (up to 16 lbs.) or chicken in about 8 to 10 minutes per pound.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Mar 20, 2012 12:57

Devo, First of all, you are initially "smoking" - not barbecuing. You are smoking moist raw meat in an oxygen-deprived atmosphere well within the accepted "Danger Zone" for two hours. This is not barbecue "cooking". This is inviting trouble. Again, please try to understand this: Once toxins have formed in the food, cooking will NOT destroy them. That is fact - not my imagination.

You wrote:
To give you a fast run down it is a greaseless fryer and cure is not needed at such high temps
.
Not needed? Once again, when toxins have formed in food, cooking will NOT destroy them - no matter if it`s greaseless, oil less, steam less, or whatever-less. If strains of pathogenic Salmonella, Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter, or Clostridium Botulinum, Clostridium Perfringens Campylobacter Jejuni, Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella, Bacillus Cereus, and many others have formed toxins in the meat, cooking will not destroy them. That is scientific biological fact my friend.

You asked:
I have to ask you when you cook chicken in your oven do you add cure?
When I cook a chicken in my oven, I don`t cure it first because I don`t smoke it RAW for two hours (a.) IN THE DANGER ZONE , and (b.) in an anaerobic atmosphere. And because the chicken is raw, it is also(c.) moist. These three conditions comprise the milieu specifically to be avoided to prevent inevitable bacterial growth produced under these conditions. If I were to cook a "smoked chicken", the answer to your question would be "hell yes, I`d cure it before I smoked it" - (ref.) The first rule of basic sausagemaking - page 20 of "Great Sausage Recipes And Meat Curing" by Rytek Kutas states: "Don`t forget this one cardinal rule: IF IT CAN`T BE CURED, DON`T SMOKE IT."

The fact remains that you are placing raw meat in an anaerobic atmosphere for two hours where conditions for the development of several types of bacteria may develop, including clostridium botulinum. Smoke cuts off oxygen. Strike one. Next, the well-known "Danger Zone" is universally accepted as 40°F. to 140°F. (4°C. to 60°C.). You state that your smoker is 55°F. That is 15° into the Danger Zone. Strike two. The meat is moist. Strike three.

You stated:
I really think you should do some research on just what a big easy is and the high temp it cooks at.
The College of Agriculture at Auburn University in Alabama has stated that once the temperature reaches 50°F (10°C.), bacteria will double twice as fast every time we raise the temperature by merely 5 degree increments. I did my research on this subject during my 6th year of school. My thesis was published. I suggest we summon the opinion of the F.S.I.S. on this matter as it is clear you have controversial issues with my assessment. I would love to hear what these boys would say about you smoking raw chicken.

Whether you agree with me or not, the fact remains each year in my country, food borne diseases cause approximately 76 million illnesses and 325,00 hospitalizations. Of this number, more than 5,000 Americans painfully suffer the clearly evident indications and symptoms of preventable food contamination, breathe their last breath, and agonizingly die!

I`m not trying to be controversial. I am simply spelling out known data and I support proven medical facts. I would reflect your own words toward you in saying, "I really think you should do some research".

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Last edited by Chuckwagon on Wed Mar 21, 2012 05:13, edited 1 time in total.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Devo » Tue Mar 20, 2012 14:57

Very good reply there CW, instead of going on with quotes from a book lets just delete this post and be done with it. I guess I'm going to have to agree to disagree.
Good day
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Post by nuynai » Tue Mar 20, 2012 15:36

CW, What's your opinion on cooking at 225 on BGE and putting some smoke at the same time. Smoke should adhere and cooking at 225 should keep bacteria at bay. Thanks.
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Post by Devo » Tue Mar 20, 2012 16:47

It really shound not be called cold smoking at all as that gives a false positive to what you want to accomplish. It should be called smoking in the danger zone.
Enough said. CW delete this post please and thank you
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Post by ssorllih » Tue Mar 20, 2012 17:49

I believe that were I catering a party I would rather have CW in charge of food safety than anyone else.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Mar 20, 2012 22:17

Nuynai asked:
CW, What's your opinion on cooking at 225 on BGE and putting some smoke at the same time. Smoke should adhere and cooking at 225 should keep bacteria at bay. Thanks.
Hi Nuynai. Great question. No problem with safety in that application as 225°F constitutes "cooking" temperature and the smoke application is secondary. As the temperature climbs throughout the "Danger Zone", with a target of 225°F., it does so quickly enough to be safe.
OK, I've got some terrific "cowboy's western wisdom for you"... "Never mention the word "rope" in the home of a hanged man!" :roll: And for heck's sake... don't ever kick a fresh cowchip on a hot day! :shock:

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon


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Last edited by Chuckwagon on Tue Mar 20, 2012 23:18, edited 1 time in total.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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