Online Workshop: Project B2 (October 2013)

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Chorizo

Post by el Ducko » Mon Oct 28, 2013 18:30

Speaking of Chorizo, let`s make some that you will enjoy eating for breakfast. In South Texas, the breakfast taco is ubiquitous, so much so that the number of people who can say `ubiquitous` must number in the teens already. (Not so, those who can spell...) A breakfast taco consists of a flour tortilla or two corn tortillas, wrapped around just about anything that can`t get away. Eggs and [blank], where [blank] can mean just about anything that can be scrambled with eggs, are most popular. Otherwise, it would be a lunch taco or a dinner taco, I guess. I`ll have to think about that. Popular combinations include beans and egg, bacon and egg, cheese and egg, chorizo and egg, potatoes and egg, nopalitos (cactus) and egg, yada-yada and egg...

The chorizo that we`ll use for breakfast tacos is typically a loose, fresh sausage, although the fermented variety can certainly be chopped up and browned. CW had a cured, smoked, semi-dry version as part of the first Project B which was good, especially as an ingredient in sausage dishes (great when cooked with black beans), but my favorite is still the fresh variety. It`s in here as a result of my love of chorizo for breakfast but my distaste for the kind available in grocery stores. The commercial stuff has all the things left over after they make sausage (meaning the parts you don`t want to know about), and is so fatty that it melts before it cooks (not a good sign). "Drain it," you say? The taste components are oil-soluble, so draining the grease isn`t the answer. ...a shame.

A Starting Recipe: My apologies for the wordiness of my writeup (see CW`s post for the links, starting with http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.php?t=5873). I get carried away. Just wade through it until you hit Melissa Guerra`s recipe, not too far down that first page, which is a good starting place. Be advised beforehand that these recipes are not very spicy (piquant, a.k.a picante) in the hot pepper sense. Yes, there are plenty of spices, but they are for flavor and color, rather than "heat."

Ms. Guerra`s recipe has about 0.8 percent ancho chile, a little bit more than the garlic, so it`s a nice, mild introduction to the genre. You`ll notice the use of vinegar, which definitely affects the flavor. This is traditional. I speculate (but can`t prove it) that this was used because Spanish chorizos traditionally are fermented and have a subtle tangy flavor, but in the "New World" it was difficult to duplicate the required conditions for fermentation.

A Better Recipe? Try my standard recipe if you prefer. It`s listed at that same link but farther down, or at http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.ph ... rizo+ducko and features a bit more chiles as ingredients. My standard recipe contains about 1.8% ancho chile and another 1% pasilla chile, both of which are fairly mild, flavorful chiles. There`s also about 1.5% garlic and 0.6% sweet paprika for flavor and color. You`ll like the little touch of flavor that the cloves add- - like the cumin, it`s another Mexican traditional touch.

Spicier But Still Mild:
Hey! ...just like me! I`ve been playing around with Sriracha, that Vietnamese condiment made from red jalapenos, lately. You might enjoy this one. I run the ancho up slightly (to 2%) as well as the pasilla (1%), increase the color slightly (paprika to 1%), and add Sriracha to 1%. The recipe that follows uses one pound of 80/20 pork mince (from pork butt). You can taste the spiciness. ...piquancy. ...pecan seeds? What-the-???
(What you CAN'T do is measure to two decimal places, unless you borrow Ross Hill's double beam balance. Sorry about that. Blame my spreadsheet.)


Chorizo with Sriracha
1.79 tsp 10.7 gm 2.11% salt (non-iodized)
..............454. gm 89.96% Pork Class II-A: <30%. Pork butt
40.00 ml 40.0 gm 7.93% vinegar (6% acid)
4.04 tsp 10.1 gm 2.00% chile-ancho
2.08 tsp 5.20 gm 1.03% chile-pasilla
0.04 tsp 0.08 gm 0.02% cloves (ground)
0.14 tsp 0.28 gm 0.06% coriander (ground seed)
0.08 tsp 0.16 gm 0.03% cumin (ground)
3.20 tsp 8.00 gm 1.59% garlic (fresh)
0.11 tsp 0.16 gm 0.03% oregano
2.38 tsp 5.00 gm 0.99% paprika sweet
0.14 tsp 0.30 gm 0.06% pepper (black)
0.96 tsp 5.00 gm 0.99% sriracha

Processing and Packaging:
For all of these recipes, coarse grind and refrigerate the pork butt. Mix the salt into the vinegar and dissolve it, for better distribution. Remove the seeds from the chiles (toasted, if you like), break the chiles up into pieces, then grind them in a coffee grinder or the like. Then mix them and the spices into the vinegar. I use fresh garlic, finely chopped. If you use powdered garlic, cut the weight in half.

Mix the vinegar + spices into the chilled meat mince, using gloved hands. Once it is well-mixed and starts to stiffen (which it won`t, much, due to the vinegar), press it into the bottom of the bowl, then cover with plastic wrap or waxed paper. Refrigerate overnight.

The next day, I like to package the sausage in usable quantities. I use 5-1/2-by-6-inch fold-top sandwich bags (the cheapest kind), weighing out about 4 ounces (100 grams or so) per bag. I roll them tightly, then use vacuum seal bags to freeze them, two or four to the package. If you`re clever, you can use enough freezer bag to be able to clip the corner (break the vacuum), pull out one cylinder, then vacuum seal the bag again and again several times.

Cooking: Each rolled sandwich bag contains enough chorizo for four eggs, and will feed two people. Toss the contents of a sandwich bag into a skillet on low heat, take your time until the sausage is completely thawed, spread it out, fry it, then add in the eggs, scrambling as you go. You can eat the eggs scrambled, or (my favorite) steam or fry tortillas and add the scrambled mix to them. I usually add some salsa. Yum!
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Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Oct 29, 2013 00:51

Sambal, liquid smoke is made by distilling massive amounts of hickory real smoke. It is a fascinating process best left to the professionals. Next, you wrote:
I don't have a warm smoker, but I could smoke at around 35-40 oC for one or two hours. Could I finish of the kabanosy in the oven after that?
Sambal, remember the three things needed for bacteria to multiply. Pathogenic bacteria are mostly anaerobic. By casing the kabanosy, you are cutting off oxygen. Next, bacteria need moisture and nutrient. The damp meat is ideal for providing pathogenic bacteria with just the right amount of moisture to multiply. Lastly, the temperature of your cold-smoker is perfect for the growth of pathogenic bacteria. Your suggested temperature of 35-40° C. is smack dab in the middle of the "danger zone". So, the answer to your question is no - it is just not safe.

However, you can use a hot smoker in which the initial smoke-house temperature (pre-heat) would be 52°C (125°F) with smoke being introduced. The temperature inside the smokehouse would be GRADUALLY increased (as the smoking continues), until the smokehouse temperature reaches 71°C (160°F.). Carefully observe and monitor the internal meat temperature of the sausages throughout the process. When the IMT reaches 66°C. (150°F), remove the sausages immediately and allow them to cool to room temperature.

Sambal, the cold-smoking process is for a completely different type of processing. It is a "drying" process in which bacteria cultures have been added to meat to control pathogens and the product loses moisture. It is a more specialized smoking process that we will discuss and use later. The "hot" smoking step at this juncture is very important. Please don`t overlook it. I will re-post some information about it. Stay well my friend and safe! Heat up your smoker!

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
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Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Oct 29, 2013 00:51

Cold Smoking vs. Hot Smoking

"Cold smoked meats prevent or slow down the spoilage of fats, which increases their shelf life. The product is drier and saltier with a more pronounced smoky flavor and very long shelf life. The color varies from yellow to dark brown on the surface and dark red inside. Cold smoked products are not submitted to the cooking process. Stan Marianski said, "If you want to cold smoke your meats, bear in mind that with the exception of people living in areas with a cold climate like Alaska, it will have to be done in the winter months just as it was done 500 years ago."

Cold smoking is a drying process usually involving many hours for several days or even weeks. On the other hand, hot-smoking is a smoking-prep cooking process usually finished relatively shortly (within hours). To ensure a constant breakdown of nitrate into nitrite in cold-smoking sausages, Cure #2 is most often used. However, occasionally in some comminuted sausage, the use of Cure #1 may be specified. Cold-smoked products are not usually smoked continuously as fresh air is usually allowed into the smoker at regular intervals to allow time for complete penetration of smoke deep into muscle tissues. As moisture leaves the meat, the product will become naturally rigid.

Because cold-smoked meat and fish products are not cooked, cold smoking is an entirely contrasting process from hot-smoking as the heat source is remote and the smoke is "piped" into the smokehouse from several feet away, giving the smoke time to cool down. Most often, the cold-smokehouse is elevated higher than the heat source, or the smoke is forced inside by a fan.

Because fish begins to cook at 85°F. (30°C.), the temperature in most American "cold-smoke houses" is less than 85° F. (29°C.) and often much lower in order to prevent spoilage. In Russia and many parts of Europe, the upper limit has been 71°F. (22°C.).

Cold-smoked products must contain nitrite or nitrate/nitrite cures to be safe because even using thin smoke, oxygen is cut off and most obligate anaerobic bacteria, some facultative anaerobic bacteria, and even some microaerophile bacteria may thrive. Never cold-smoke fresh sausage or any meat product without using a curing agent.

Some dry-cured (raw) sausages are held for weeks in cold-smoke while they continue to dehydrate safely below .85 Aw. Initially they are protected from pathogenic bacteria by the sausage`s salt content. This affords their only protection while the lactic acid is being produced by lactobacilli and pediococci bacteria. Additionally, some semi-dry cured sausages may be cold-smoked after they have been prep-cooked. Again, although cold smoking is not a continuous process, it usually assures deep smoke penetration. It is usually discontinued overnight, allowing fresh air to assist with the uniform loss of moisture.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
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Post by markjass » Tue Oct 29, 2013 03:30

el Ducko
4.04 tsp 10.1 gm 2.00% chile-ancho
2.08 tsp 5.20 gm 1.03% chile-pasilla
Have not got pasilla. Would Guajillo or serento or chipotle do do as a substitute. Which would you suggest.

Mark
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Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Oct 29, 2013 04:12

Yahooooo Duck! Nice recipe sir! Many thanks! I am going to try Melissa Guerra`s recipe first then yours. I am intrigued by the method of preparation. Drying the seeds, salt in the vinegar, etc. You've really got this stuff down to a fine art. I hope people have read your book. I sure have. It should be in print pal! Thank you so very much for your expertise and sharing.
However.... I still believe you are "quacked"! :mrgreen:

Best Wishes Pal,
Chuckwagon
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Post by markjass » Tue Oct 29, 2013 07:44

Can taste it. I will slap inside some pita bread and pan cook it until the bread is crisp. For a work lunch or tea I will omit the egg, mix it with feta cheese and some fried onions and Chipotles en Adobo sauce and use a toasty to cook it.

el Ducko I Had a look at your chapters I did not know where to start, but now I do.

Thanks e.d I love Chorizo's and cw for getting project b going. I think that project Y as in yum is a good name for this project. It is great looking at peoples pictures. A couple of them got me thinking and resulted in me weighing the fat from the pork shoulder that I used. I was adding extra back far. I found that I did not need to add as much backfat as I was.

Do you people use the pork skin in sausages as part of the fat amount? I have not been. I have loads in my freezer. I use it to flavour stews and beans.

Oh yes. I noticed that, unusually you used Iodised salt in your recipe. In NZ there is a lack of iodine in the soil (as well as other things including selenium). That is why I use iodized salt in many things (not sausages, preserves etc).

Mark
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Post by el Ducko » Tue Oct 29, 2013 12:06

markjass wrote:el Ducko
4.04 tsp 10.1 gm 2.00% chile-ancho
2.08 tsp 5.20 gm 1.03% chile-pasilla
Have not got pasilla. Would Guajillo or serento or chipotle do do as a substitute. Which would you suggest.
Mark
From http://www.chilipeppermadness.com/chili ... IcY_Gdy34E "Our Chili Pepper List," comes the following:
● An Ancho pepper is dried form of the poblano chili pepper.
● Pasilla or "little raisin" properly refers to the dried chilaca pepper. The chilaca, when fresh, is also known as pasilla bajio, or as the chile negro or "Mexican negro" because, while it starts off dark green, it ends up dark brown. It typically grows from 8 to 10 inches long.

So substitutions should involve a decision based on flavor/taste as well as "heat"/Scoville units. Here`s another handy table summarizing Scoville: http://www.produceoasis.com/TipOTDay_fo ... 26tip.html with some additions from various other sources. My best advice: go with a dried pepper with low Scoville value. It will taste slightly different, thereby allowing you to make your own "mark", Mark, on the chorizo scene. As long as it tastes good, no problem! Enjoy! WooHoo!

Chiles - Scoville Scale
Here is a listing of many peppers, from http://www.produceoasis.com/TipOTDay_fo ... 26tip.html
Bell (0 - 100)
El Paso (0 - 100)
Anaheim (100 - 500)
Paprika (250 - 1000)
Poblano (500 - 1000)
Pasado (dried Anaheim) (500 - 2500)
Ancho (dried Poblano) (1000 - 3,000)
Passilla (Chilacas, dried Chile Negro) (1000 - 1,500)
New Mexico Green Chile (Hatch) (1,500 - 3,000)
Guajillo (dried Mirasol) (2,500 --6,000)
Jalapeno (3,000 - 6,000....25,000)
Serrano (5,000 - 15,000)
Yellow Caribe (5,000 - 15,000)
Aleppo (10,000)
Cascabel (11,000)
Chipotle (New Mexico red chile) (15,000)
Chipotle (New Mexico Morita red chile) (15,000)
Chile de Arbol (15,000 - 35,000)
Asian Hots (15,000 - 30,000)
Hidalgo (15,000 - 30,000)
Serrano (15,000 - 30,000)
Crushed Red Pepper (California) (20,000)
Cayenne (30,000 - 50,000)
Tabasco (30,000 - 50,000)
Red Chile (30,000 - 50,000)
Chiltecpin (30,000 - 50,000)
Tabiche (30,000 - 50,000)
Bahamian (30,000 - 50,000)
Kumataka (30,000 - 50,000)
Piquin (30,000 - 70,000)
Thai (bird`s eye) (30,000 - 70,000)
Crushed Red Pepper (Indian) (40,000)
Saanaam (Indian) (40,000)
Aji (50,000 - 100,000)
Dundicut (Pakistan) (55,000 - 65,000)
Tien Tsin (Asian) (60,000)
Habanero (Scotch Bonnet) (300,000)
Naga Jolokia (1,000,000+)
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Post by markjass » Wed Oct 30, 2013 09:05

Tastes and flavours are such a personal thing. You can grow up with a particular herb or spice and like it or dislike it. Some flavours you can get to like over time and others you cannot find yourself liking. It may be association or just a dislike.

When I was about 17 I was lucky enough to get full sponsorship to do a month long outward bound course. Before I went I was not familiar with sourdough bread and was not that fond of salami or cheese. On return to the UK I could not get enough salami or cheese, but had developed an intense dislike of rye sourdough bread. Every so often I try some, but cannot get my taste buds around it. Yet I hand make all of our bread using a sponge (flour. Water and yeast) and sometimes leave it up to 3 days. The sponge is quite acidic. I love the taste of the bread. I have also made bread with a wheat starter that has been left to ferment without yeast and do not like it.

I mentioned that I am not keen on nutmeg or mace in fresh sausages. To me it leaves an antiseptic aftertaste. Yet it works for me in liver sausage or Mortadella. I also use it when I cure pancetta. I tend to substitute allspice for nutmeg or mace in fresh sausages. I associate mace, nutmeg and cinnamon with Christmas and to a lesser extent Easter.

As a child and young adult, caraway, dill, aniseed and fennel were flavours that I did not know. Caraway and aniseed took me a long time to get to like. I love them in sausages, but not so in bread. When I set out to make a sausage or whatever I may start with a recipe, but only use that as a start. I tend not to try and make an authentic dish as I am never sure what authentic is or how long it takes for something to become a tradition. I suppose what I am saying is if you are not after authentic and dislike a flavour try it a couple of times, you never know it may grow on you (make small batches) and if you still do not like it try and find a substitute.

Mark
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Post by markjass » Wed Oct 30, 2013 09:16

Saw this article on the BBC web page http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-24737588:

California city in Sriracha odour complaint

A California city has sued the maker of Sriracha hot sauce saying the factory's smell makes the area uninhabitable. . .

Getting some stuff in NZ is so hard and yet other things are so easy. It is very hard to get hold of pigs liver, beef middles, but is so easy to get hold of regular and obscure Asain and mexican spices and sauces. Bought some Srracha sauce. Tried 1/2 a teaspoon of it. Loved it. Will report back on el Ducko's recipe after the weekend. Somehow it will not be objective as I know I am going to love it.

Mark
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Post by el Ducko » Wed Oct 30, 2013 15:16

...hope you like the recipe, Mark. Feel free to tinker with it. ("We call that progress.") Trying the multitude of peppers that are available, toasting them, etc. could be quite rewarding, much like the variations in coffee selection and roasting. Most people won't be able to tell the difference beyond "okay" versus "yuk" (my wife reminds me not to over-step the line between "connoisseur" and "sewer"), but the possibilities are endless. What a great hobby!

I have the same (ambivalent) feelings about peanut products as you do about some flavors. We lived downwind from a peanut processing plant, back in my Army days. The first two weeks of the harvest season were wonderful, the smell of roasting peanuts in the air. Then, after the oil that settled on everything went rancid and the rats moved in to glean the missed nuts, it was horrible for about two months.

Maybe a little sriracha would have helped.
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Beginner's Sausage Stuffing

Post by Shuswap » Wed Oct 30, 2013 20:08

I'm really enjoying the B2 thread. In preparing for guests the next couple of weeks I have made a Bratwurst from prepared mix and Aidell's Iowa Sausage from scratch. I find it gets a little intense when stuffing as I have some difficulty getting the hog casing onto the horn and difficulty getting a nice uniform filled casing. Guess there is an art to it and I'll just have to perserve. As a trainer, I preach practice does not make perfect, only perfect practice does. Now I'm trying to relearn the steps of getting from mediocre to perfect. :neutral:
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu Oct 31, 2013 04:08

Shuswap wrote:
I find it gets a little intense when stuffing as I have some difficulty getting the hog casing onto the horn and difficulty getting a nice uniform filled casing.

Okay pal, let's talk about that just a bit. That's the reason we have this Project B2 - to share information and solve problems.
I've found that a sharp pair of scissors makes a clean cut on the end of the casing. Use your forefingers and thumbs underwater and it should separate easily to gulp up a big water bubble and slide the end over the horn. Let the water bubble lubricate the horn.
Most ol' timers will chuck their plastic stuffing horns and use stainless steel. Buff and polish the end so the casing will slip right on. Remember to use water (in the bubble inside the casing) to lubricate the horn. Don't use butter, lard, etc. trying to make it slippery. It will affect the sausage later. Stick with water and practice. You'll get the hang of it soon.
Anybody else have a suggestion here? Let's hear 'em.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
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Post by Thewitt » Thu Oct 31, 2013 05:24

One of the keys to uniform stuffing is to feed at a steady rate and provide just enough resistance to the sausage to get the firmness you are after.

Manually, a piston stuffer you can crank with one hand while caressing the casing with the other is perfect.

It's harder with a motorized stuffer at first, but practice will ultimately give you a feel for it.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu Oct 31, 2013 05:58

Hi Smoke chasers! :mrgreen:
I need a little input at this point. We've talked about "fresh" sausage and made some for breakfast. There's been quite a bit of reading but that's how we learn. I hope you are using the checkups to evaluate your progress. It's almost time to move on to "cured" sausages.

Right now, I need to know if we are going to fast or too slow. Let's hear some comments and suggestions. This is YOUR project so, let's make it comfortable. Learning the finer points of this hobby is fun and very much worth getting involved. But shucks, life gets in the way sometimes eh? Things happen that soak up our time or resources. Hey, I understand if we need to pause to catch up on reading etc. But you've got to let us know. We certainly don't want to lose anyone. Here's a list of the Project B2 outfit. Let's hear from you to see where you are in the project.

1. ssorllih
2. El DuckO
3. Sambal Badjak
4. AJWillsnet
5. Grasshopper
6. Tasplas
7. Redzed
8. Crusty44
9. Hamn'Cheese
10. DDWaterdog
11. SAR
12. M.D.Flan
13. Shuswap
14. MRMatuszek
15. Sawhorseray
16. Ursula
17. Markjass
18. two_MN_kids
19. Cabonaia
20. Pignout
21. TruckTramp
22. Doug
23. Ottothecow
24. mweipert
25. TSmodie
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by sambal badjak » Thu Oct 31, 2013 11:53

Well, I am still there and enjoying the project (a little distracted at the moment, watching 7 elephants preparing to go for a swim).....
I have skipped the fresh onion and sausages, liked my breakfast sausages and am still looking at kabanosy.
Got a question here, as my idea of coolish smoking was not considered safe, but it will only be 2 hours or so in the danger zone AND it will contain sodium nitrite, so looks pretty OK to me, also refering to this thread http://www.wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.php?t=6734, more specifically, post 10 and 11 (i don't know how to link to these specific entries).
Other than that I could use a stovetop smoker, but that one will run at much higher temperatures.
I am also still looking for a single hot plate to use in conjunction with my cold smoke generator.

Next up, will be the chorizo. I could use the same recipe and stuff into sausage skins isn't it? I just like chorizo on the bbq, but am not too fond of it when fried like mince. Don't ask me why as I have no idea why!

I want to make some boerewors as well, there are just not enough hours in a day, or work tends to get in the way.

I am a bit behind with the reading, just need to work through the casings section and I am up to date again.
I find myself reading and re-readin Marianski's book. I have it on my kindle, but will actually order a hard copy as well (just easier to browse through).
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