Jerky And Biltong

H_Nutczak
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 8
Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 19:01
Location: Minocqua, Wisconsin

Post by H_Nutczak » Tue Jan 25, 2011 08:12

Chuckwagon, what concerns me about your recipes is that they have no active curing ingredient such as "Sodium Nitrite"

I advocate that if any meat is going to get smoked or dehydrated at temperatures between 40-140, that a cure be used to help combat harmful bacterial growth.

A smoker is a perfect environment for C. Botulinum to propagate, here is why;
typically smoking temps are between 40-140 which are perfect for its growth
the smoke creates a "Low-Oxygen" environment which C. Botulinum requires to grow.

Plus the use of a proper curing agent will help the meat retain the red color commonly associated with smoked/dried meats.
using a cure also changes the texture and flavor of meat to a more palatable texture.

I use a very simple recipe for jerky,
1.5 tsp of salt per pound of meat
and for each 5 pounds of meat, add 1 level tsp of Cure #1
coat the meat evenly with the salt and cure mixture, let cure for 48 hours
rinse the meat under cold running water, pat dry, sprinkle blk pepper on to taste dry ate temperatures under 120 degrees with light smoke added, it is best to let the meat feel tacky to the touch before adding any smoke, watch those temps, do not cook the meat just let it dry slowly.
User avatar
Chuckwagon
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4494
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 04:51
Location: Rocky Mountains

Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Jan 25, 2011 09:26

Hey Hey Nutzee, Where ya been?

You wrote:
Chuckwagon, what concerns me about your recipes is that they have no active curing ingredient such as "Sodium Nitrite"
I advocate that if any meat is going to get smoked or dehydrated at temperatures between 40-140, that a cure be used to help combat harmful bacterial growth.
Nutzer you been drinkin` rookus juice again? Go back and re-read my post. I clearly state:
you will need to add Cure #1 accordingly. Our American Cure is much stronger than your Peklisol. Please be very careful to add the right amount. For really good jerky, just grind the meat, add the cure and spices, mix well and press the raw meat onto sterile screens to dry.
I couldn't agree with you more when you said, "typically smoking temps are between 40-140 which are perfect for its (botulinum) growth."

In fact, if you will look in the "tech" forum, you'll see that I posted an entire article about nitrites, nitrates, and their effect upon raw meats.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
User avatar
Chuckwagon
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4494
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 04:51
Location: Rocky Mountains

Post by Chuckwagon » Tue Jan 25, 2011 10:39

My jerky recipes above are for only 2 lbs. (907 gr.) of meat. In America, this amount of meat requires merely 2.26 g. of Cure #1. In Poland, 907 grams of meat (2 lbs.) requires 23.5 g. of Peklosol.

In America, it is much more simple to make 5 lbs. of jerky using one level teaspoon of Cure #1. In Poland, 2268 grams (5 lbs.) of meat requires 59 g. of Peklosol. However, not everyone likes 5 lbs of jerky all at once. Some folks just don`t eat enough of it to warrant making 5 pounds of the stuff at one time. For this reason, I formulated the recipes for two-pound batches only.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
unclebuck
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 135
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2011 14:49
Location: Lac La Biche, Alberta

Moose or Elk Jerky

Post by unclebuck » Thu Feb 03, 2011 14:46

Brine the I have used for my moose & elk jerky for many years based on 5lb of meat-works equally well with beef.

1 tsp prague cure #1 for each 5 lbs meat. (added by moderator by request)
8 cups filtered water
2 T uniodized salt
4 T Mrs. Dash original seasoning
1/2 cup demarara sugar
1/2 cup fancy molasses
3/4 cup soy sauce
1/3 cup worcestershire sauce
1 1/2 T crushed garlic
1 1/2 T onion powder
1 T red pepper flakes

Mix in stainless steel bowl or stone crock.

Slice meat across the grain 1/4" thick and submerge in brine overnight in refrigerator. Drain in morning and lay out on racks to air dry for an hour or so. Put in either smoker or dehydrator to dry(meat should still be pliable)and then smoke to your particular palate!!!

Enjoy.
Last edited by unclebuck on Tue Jan 17, 2012 07:43, edited 1 time in total.
"What can't be smoked can't be eaten."
unclebuck
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 135
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2011 14:49
Location: Lac La Biche, Alberta

Post by unclebuck » Thu Feb 03, 2011 15:51

I forgot to include 1 tsp prague #1 for each 5 lbs meat.
"What can't be smoked can't be eaten."
User avatar
Chuckwagon
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4494
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 04:51
Location: Rocky Mountains

Post by Chuckwagon » Fri Feb 04, 2011 15:20

Good one unclebuckeroo!
Sure glad you remembered the Cure #1. Mighty important it is. Thanks for posting & sharing your recipe. I'm intrigued by the "Mrs. Dash" seasoning. I've got to try it in jerky. Hmmm, just when I thought I'd seen it all. :wink:
Is it going to thaw out up there? How thick does the ice have to be to be able to drive your truck out on it? I read somewhere that 4 inches would hold up a locomotive! :shock:

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
unclebuck
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 135
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2011 14:49
Location: Lac La Biche, Alberta

Post by unclebuck » Fri Feb 04, 2011 16:18

I won't venture out on the ice with my pickup unless I have at least 8" of ice!!! I have had too many friends drop their vehicles through thinner ice, rushing the mode of transport and having them "written off" by insurance
"What can't be smoked can't be eaten."
User avatar
Chuckwagon
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4494
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 04:51
Location: Rocky Mountains

Post by Chuckwagon » Sat Feb 05, 2011 00:43

The server won't let me in Siara. I may have to use a wrench! :lol:
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
steelchef
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 282
Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 02:06
Location: Fort St John, British Columbia

Post by steelchef » Fri Mar 11, 2011 12:00

We make a lot of jerky from venison, both deer and elk, also moose, bison and caribou. Our approach is to prepare a marinade of ingredients that we enjoy. Our general tendency is toward East Asian flavours, soy, sesame, five spice or anise etc. We also enjoy Worcester based marinades. Tamarind is a great flavour to experiment with. Experimentation is the only way to find your faves. My wife is hooked on Teriyaki. I prefer a little more ginger and garlic with a soy sauce base. These flavours and spices will incidentally work well in sausage making. I am presently experimenting and will advise the forum when I have product(s) worthy of publishing.

Most jerky recipes will advise you to cut the meat with the grain as opposed to against it. We find that to be too chewy, so we cut it cross grain or on a bias.

Jerky was originally developed for preservation so many recipes contain much more salt than is necessary or desirable, (for health reasons.)

We freeze our production in snack sized vacuum bags. My wife (Barb) often takes a bag or two of jerky and a Ziplock with a variety of veggies as a lunch. She grazes on it throughout the day and arrives home with a good appetite for supper.

Here`s a big tip: Keep the kids out of it. They will eat it until full, then when it rehydrates in their tummy`s; major pain, constipation and general grief for all involved. This is from personal experience.


Teriyaki Jerky

For 5-lbs of lean red meat:

1.25 C Soy Sauce
1/2 C Worcestershire
1 tsp Garlic Powder
1 tsp Onion Powder
1 tsp Smoky Paprika
1 tsp Black Pepper, freshly ground
3/4 C. Brown Sugar
1 Tbsp Sesame Oil
2 Tbsp Dry Sherry
1/2 tsp ground white pepper
2 Tbsp Sesame oil
1/2 tsp ground ginger
2-3 green onions (scallions)
1-2 cloves fresh garlic

Blend on high until emulsified.

Slice partially frozen meat into strips 1/4 " thick. (Be sure that there is liitle or no fat included.)
Marinate for 24-36 hours in the fridge. On the day of drying: drain for an hour. Before smoking, hang on toothpicks from racks for more drying space (Thanks for the tip, Stogie).

Dry/Smoke for 1-6 hours at 150°. Use smoke for first 3 total hours, then just dry. Start sampling at 3 total hours until desired dryness, smokiness is achieved. I find that 3 total hours of smoke, and about 6 hours of total drying work for me. All depends on thickness of meat and personal tastes. (This can also be prepared without smoke in a dehydrator. Suggest adding 1 teaspoon of liquid smoke if you choose this method.)

Apple, maple or other softer smoke flavours are preferable to the heavier hickory or oak for this application.

Image

This batch was done in the Little Chief. the rack is only 12" square.
Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites. Moderation is for monks.
SikaStag
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Feb 26, 2011 14:16
Location: Scottish Borders

Post by SikaStag » Fri Mar 11, 2011 12:02

Thank you Maxell
I have seen a really good venison recipe on the Polish site, the translation is not very good, I may ask for your assistance in translating this for me.

I have been watching the news on the Earthquake and Tsunami in Japan, beyond belief the devastation that has hit the country. How long it will take for the country to recover from this is any-ones guess, mass areas of agriculture have been washed away. How they will be able to grow enough food to feed the nation will be a challenge. My heart goes out to them.

Ian
Maxell
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 105
Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2005 22:21
Location: Bełchatów
Contact:

Post by Maxell » Fri Mar 11, 2011 12:06

Write about what recipe it walks?
Pod ten adres proszę przesyłać zdjęcia i teksty. Zdjęcia muszą posiadać szerokość co najmniej 800 pikseli - wysokość nie jest istotna - ważne by były dobrej jakości.
maxell11@wp.pl
SikaStag
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Feb 26, 2011 14:16
Location: Scottish Borders

Post by SikaStag » Fri Mar 11, 2011 12:10

Nice one Colin. Thank you, this is a must try recipe.

I have been reading up on Jerky and Biltong.
I do not want to upset any people here but what I read on web sites is that Biltong is way better than jerky. This is just what I have read not my opinion, I would love to hear some feed back from any members that may have experience with both types of dried meat. I would appreciate any feedback.

Ian
steelchef
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 282
Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 02:06
Location: Fort St John, British Columbia

Post by steelchef » Fri Mar 11, 2011 12:17

Ian,

Biltong is just Dutch for meat strips. This link may clear it up. The South Africans simply use 'bush meat' in the same ways we do and flavour it to their liking.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biltong

Cheers,
Colin
Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites. Moderation is for monks.
SikaStag
Beginner
Beginner
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Feb 26, 2011 14:16
Location: Scottish Borders

Post by SikaStag » Fri Mar 11, 2011 12:22

This is the page that I really like. I can not translate all. Is there any recipes that I could follow to make this type of meat.

http://www.wedlinydomowe.pl/articles.php?id=1716

This is my translation.

http://translate.googleusercontent.com/ ... NQR75_JdvQ
steelchef
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 282
Joined: Mon Nov 15, 2010 02:06
Location: Fort St John, British Columbia

Post by steelchef » Fri Mar 11, 2011 12:33

SikaStag wrote: I have been watching the news on the Earthquake and Tsunami in Japan, beyond belief the devastation that has hit the country. How long it will take for the country to recover from this is any-ones guess, mass areas of agriculture have been washed away. How they will be able to grow enough food to feed the nation will be a challenge. My heart goes out to them.
Ian
It is far worse than the recent event in Christchurch. I have concerns for my youngest son who is on Vancouver Island. Although it seems a remote possibility, all low lying Pacific Rim countries are potentially at risk.
Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites. Moderation is for monks.
Post Reply