Spent Grain Bread

HamnCheese
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 123
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2012 03:24
Location: PA

Spent Grain Bread

Post by HamnCheese » Thu May 10, 2012 00:47

Image

Bread made from 'spent grain' - the leftovers from beer making. Many thanks to Appalachian Brewery for the raw product. Also made veggie burgers, flour and cookies! All in all an interesting afternoon in the kitchen.

Lynn
Youth is the gift of nature, but age is a work of art.
Stanislaw Lec
ssorllih
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4331
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2011 19:32
Location: maryland

Post by ssorllih » Thu May 10, 2012 01:27

Nice crumb! nice uniform texture. The flavor should be wonderful. Nice malt coloring, Good crust.
Recipe is requested please.
We have a local micro brewery that would benefit from this.
Ross- tightwad home cook
User avatar
Chuckwagon
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4494
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 04:51
Location: Rocky Mountains

Post by Chuckwagon » Thu May 10, 2012 01:29

Wow Lynn, that looks marvelous! I like the coarse texture and color too. Care to share the recipe? What kind of a sandwich are you going to make? :razz: Yum!

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
User avatar
JerBear
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 407
Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2011 05:01
Location: San Diego, CA
Contact:

Post by JerBear » Thu May 10, 2012 01:59

A buddy of mine makes some spent grain cookies, it's a great bonus for helping make a batch of beer!
HamnCheese
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 123
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2012 03:24
Location: PA

Post by HamnCheese » Thu May 10, 2012 02:08

Started with 2 cups whole wheat flour, 1 teaspoon dry yeast, 2 tablespoons beet syrup (could substitute molasses) and enough water to make a pancake like batter. Let that mixture sit for five hours or so.

Added 2 cups spent grain, two cups artisan white flour, one more cup whole wheat, one more teaspoon yeast, 2 teaspoons salt and enough water to make a sticky dough. Let it sit for 1/2 hour. Kneaded with a little more white flour to create a gluten coat. Raised it for two hours, then did an envelope fold and shaped back into a round. Raised another hour, shaped into loaf pans. Raised 45 minutes and baked in a 400 degree oven for half hour. Lowered the temp to 375 and baked to an internal temperature of 200 degrees.

Made the whole thing up, so there aren't exact measurements....sorry!

The dough was delightful to work with and the bread has a nutty sweet taste with a little bite from the grain...it actually smells a little like the feed room in a stable!

Lynn
Youth is the gift of nature, but age is a work of art.
Stanislaw Lec
ssorllih
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4331
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2011 19:32
Location: maryland

Post by ssorllih » Thu May 10, 2012 02:26

Lynn, I like your method! Whole wheat flour benefits from an extended ferment. If I may make a suggestion. If you will start weighing your ingredients and keeping notes you will be able to duplicate your results in later and or larger batches.
I will get myself down to the DuClaws Brewery very soon for s spent grain.
I often make 25 % whole wheat bread with a 24 hour preferment for the whole wheat flour.
Thank you for the recipe.
Ross- tightwad home cook
HamnCheese
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 123
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2012 03:24
Location: PA

Post by HamnCheese » Thu May 10, 2012 03:09

Ross, you're right, of course. I was kicking myself halfway through for not taking notes! I've been meaning to get a kitchen notebook, and here's a good reason to have one.

Thanks for the nudge.
Youth is the gift of nature, but age is a work of art.
Stanislaw Lec
ssorllih
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4331
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2011 19:32
Location: maryland

Post by ssorllih » Thu May 10, 2012 04:35

Lynn, There is a system of "baker's percentages" where all of the flours are taken as 100 % and water is measured as a fraction of that. So flour would be 100 and liquid would be 67% of the weight of the flour, salt might be 1.5 % of the weight of the flour , etc.

Working this way makes it easy to make five loaves when in the past you made three. Or you made one loaf and a dozen rolls.
Ross- tightwad home cook
HamnCheese
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 123
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2012 03:24
Location: PA

Post by HamnCheese » Thu May 10, 2012 12:47

Hey Ross,

I generally do weigh my ingredients as a percentage of flour. I had four projects going simultaneously and just decided to wing it. Not my best idea, but there you go. I also made an amazing batch of cookies and didn't write that little jewel down, either.

You'd think by now I would have learned my lesson.

So today I'm going to bake again, while the process and general percentages are still fresh in my mind, and I'll let you know how it turns out! If it's terrific I'll repost.

I wrote a note to the brewmaster thanking him for the grain and he said, come by any ol' time. So I will. Yesterday the grains were from a batch of Hefeweisen. I'm looking forward to porter or other dark beer grains to see what they contribute.




Lynn
Youth is the gift of nature, but age is a work of art.
Stanislaw Lec
User avatar
DLFL
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 335
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2011 21:10
Location: Florida

Post by DLFL » Thu May 10, 2012 23:54

Here are a couple sites that have bakers percentage calculators.
Calculator

Cal 2 downloadable

cal 3
Dick

Never quit learning!
ssorllih
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4331
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2011 19:32
Location: maryland

Post by ssorllih » Fri May 11, 2012 00:40

if you passed eighth grade arithmatic you can handle baker's percentages.
There are also sausage maker's percentages. salt and cure are are just as critical in sausage as water, salt and yeast are in bread.
Ross- tightwad home cook
HamnCheese
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 123
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2012 03:24
Location: PA

Post by HamnCheese » Fri May 11, 2012 02:39

Thanks, Dick, for posting the calculators!

Lynn
Youth is the gift of nature, but age is a work of art.
Stanislaw Lec
User avatar
DLFL
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 335
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2011 21:10
Location: Florida

Post by DLFL » Fri May 11, 2012 03:06

Ross, why do you keep telling people they are stupid if they are not friends with math?
Dick

Never quit learning!
ssorllih
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4331
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2011 19:32
Location: maryland

Post by ssorllih » Fri May 11, 2012 03:31

dick, I apologize. I didn't realize that it was coming across that way. For me figuring percentages is as easy as counting as counting the change in my pocket.
Ross- tightwad home cook
HamnCheese
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 123
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2012 03:24
Location: PA

Post by HamnCheese » Fri May 11, 2012 13:33

Hey Dick,

This morning I had more time to poke around on the calculator sites you shared. I really appreciate the Food Artisan link - wow! What a find!

Thanks again,

Lynn
Youth is the gift of nature, but age is a work of art.
Stanislaw Lec
Post Reply