Online Workshop: Project B2 (October 2013)

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redzed
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Post by redzed » Sat Mar 22, 2014 05:12

You are right Jeff, people can be more resourceful, eat healthier food and cave money to boot. But so many are just too lazy to cook anything from scratch and choose maintain a diet of highly processed ready-to-eat food. But that takes time, and takes them away from swiping the smart phone all day.
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Post by Cabonaia » Sat Mar 22, 2014 07:10

It's a funny thing about resourcefulness. I think most people have a lot of that in them, but it takes something to wake it up. I started out making sausage, and one thing led to another. For years I had wanted to make sausage, but not until I found this forum, and at the same time some good books, did it really take off for me. Now I am hooked, and an evangelist of the craft to my long-suffering friends and relations. Then the sausage got me into raising pigs, which I hadn't always wanted to do. But my wife told me that if we were going to start eating all this pork she wanted better meat. Well, ok. God bless her, now I am crazy about pigs. Then the pigs got me into butchering. Around here, you save $1 a pound by doing it yourself. With a typical pig coming in at 180 lbs. hanging weight, that's a lot! But I never thought that butchering pigs would actually be fun. Maybe fun is not the right word, but you know what I mean. It is satisfying. (It does beat heck out of hacking up chickens.) I guess this is the wrong forum to talk about raising pigs and butchering, but what I mean is, there is something fundamental about growing and cooking and preserving our own food that wakes up a part of us that might be in our cells from eons of years of our ancestors living that way. In the grand scheme of things, we have been working up our own food for a thousand years and texting our brains out for only 1 minute. I notice that many of the people on this forum make all kinds of things - pickles, sauerkraut, beer, wine, liquor. Once you start down the path of resourcefulness, you are hooked, and one thing leads to another.
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Post by el Ducko » Sun Mar 23, 2014 02:46

The "sunrise summer sausage" recipe continues to be a hit. Even seven-year-old granddaughter Madison tried it and immediately wanted more. We went through most of the remaining supply today. Time to make more. ...double recipe, this time.

Oh, yeah- - that hole wasn't from a temperature probe, it was from a stray bullet during the on-going feud with Chuckwagon. That's another good thing about summer sausage- - it's dense enough to stop both hunger and lead slugs. What wonderful stuff!
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sun Mar 23, 2014 04:11

Image
Dang Rabid Duck!
Last edited by Chuckwagon on Thu Apr 03, 2014 08:53, edited 1 time in total.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by el Ducko » Sun Mar 23, 2014 15:52

Dang Delicious Summer Sausage.
...better either make some, or else try the method that I hear some of those crusty old coots who live in the mountains around Draper, Utah, use when they run out: go door-to-door, begging for it. :twisted:
"Trick-or-treat! Yeah, I know it's not October, but rabies season is fast approaching, so hand over the summer sausage or I'll gnaw yer leg off."
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sun Mar 23, 2014 15:56

Coot?
Coot! Coot?
Who are you calling a Coot?
What do you mean... Coot?
Coot?
Well, I never!.... coot? :shock:
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Chuckwagon » Wed Mar 26, 2014 09:42

Okay Smoke addicts! Many of you have completed our goal of making the first three types of sausage - "fresh", "cured-cooked-smoked", and "semi-dry cured". Your efforts have really paid off and your photos prove that you make a top quality product! Let's move on to a project where you take your choice making one (or more) of the three types of the same sausage, and then posting some photos for comparison. You'll like this stuff... but please use only real Hungarian paprika. If you can't find it locally, send for it before you start. Pick one of the following methods that will challenge your ability a little.

Double-Barrel Debreziner (Kranska)
Make it Fresh, Cured-Smoked-Cooked, or Semi-Dry

Kranska is a coarsely-ground pork sausage containing a blend of garlic, coarsely-ground black pepper, and sweet Hungarian paprika. Don`t even think about using Spanish paprika in this one - it`s like me... (just won`t work)! Make it "fresh" or cure, cook, and smoke them. Toast the garlic to remove any bitterness. Perhaps you`d like to try a "semi-dry cured" version of Debreziner. If so, just add the Cure #1, a tablespoon of sugar, and a single gram of LHP culture.

8-1/2 lbs. pork butt with fat
1-1/2 lbs. pork back fat
2 level tspns. Cure #1 (if making "cured-cooked-smoked" sausage or "semi-dry cured" sausage).
1 cup soy protein concentrate or powdered milk.
1 gram Bactoferm™ LHP culture (if making "semi-dry cured sausage).
4 tblspns. salt
5 Tbs sweet Hungarian paprika.
3 garlic cloves (toasted, crushed, and minced)
1 tblspn. granulated garlic
2 tblspns. coarse black pepper (freshly ground)
1 tsp white pepper
1/2 cup water
32-36 mm. hog casings

To make "fresh" sausage:
Place the grinder knife and plate into the freezer while you separate the fat from the lean meat using a sharp knife. Cut the meat into 1-1/2 " cubes to keep sinew from wrapping around the auger behind the plate as the meat is ground. Grind the meat using the 3/8" plate and the pork fat using a 3/16" plate. Because this is a "fresh" sausage, no nitrite cure is necessary. Work with small batches, refrigerating the meat and fat at every opportunity. Next, add the remaining ingredients and mix the meat into a sticky meat paste, developing the primary bind. Finally, stuff the sausage into 32-36 mm. hog casings, allowing them to hang and dry at room temperature for an hour. It must never be smoked without the addition of nitrite cure. "Fresh" sausage must be refrigerated and consumed within three days, or frozen for future use.

To make "cured-cooked-smoked" sausage:
Grind the meat using the 3/8" plate and the pork fat using a 3/16" plate. Remember to add Cure #1. For ten pounds of meat, use 2 level teaspoons of cure mixed with a little water for uniform distribution and add it to the meat. Mix the cure and ingredients thoroughly throughout the primary bind. Work with small batches, kneading the meat into a sticky meat paste, refrigerating the meat and fat at every opportunity. Stuff the sausage into 32-36 mm. hog casings, allowing them to hang and dry at room temperature for an hour. Place the sausages into a preheated 130°F. (54°C.) smokehouse for an hour (with the damper open) before introducing hickory smoke and adjusting the damper to only 1/4 open. Gradually, only a couple of degrees every twenty minutes, raise the smokehouse temperature until the internal meat temperature (IMT) registers 150°F. This procedure must be done slowly to avoid breaking the fat. Remove the sausages, showering them with cold water until the IMT drops to less than 90°F. (32°C.). This sausage remains perishable and must be refrigerated until it is grilled on a smoky BBQ grill.

To make "semi-dry cured" sausage:
Grind the meat using the 3/8" plate and the pork fat using a 3/16" plate. Remember to add Cure #1, a tablespoon of sugar, and one gram of LHP culture to the recipe. For ten pounds of meat, use 2 level teaspoons of cure mixed with a little water for uniform distribution and add it to the meat. Next, prepare the culture by following the mixing directions on the packet. Use non-chlorinated water and mix the cure and ingredients thoroughly throughout the primary bind. Work with small batches, kneading the meat into a sticky meat paste, refrigerating the meat and fat at every opportunity. Stuff the sausage into 32-36 mm. hog casings.

If you have a "curing chamber", place the sausages in it and ferment at 100°F for 24 hours in 90% humidity. If a drier sausage is desired, ferment it for 48 hours.

If you do not have a "curing chamber", place one pound of regular table salt onto a cookie sheet with a lip around it. Spread the salt out evenly and add just enough water to barely cover the salt. Place the cookie sheet and salt in the bottom of an old fridge (unplugged) or your home kitchen oven. Keep the oven warm by using the pilot light in a gas model, or a hundred-watt light bulb covered with a large coffee can with several holes drilled in it. This will produce a warm area for a 2-day fermentation period at about 70% humidity.

When the fermentation has finished, place the links into your pre-heated 120°F smoker and introduce warm smoke. Use a hygrometer and try to maintain a 70% humidity during the process. Gradually, raise the temperature of the smokehouse by merely 2 degrees every 20 minutes. Do NOT attempt to boost the heat to shorten the duration. This procedure may take several hours. Monitor the IMT (internal meat temperature) and when it reaches 140°F, discontinue the cooking-smoking.

Remember to take plenty of photos throughout your efforts. Share them with the rest of the group for comparison. Above all, have fun making them. What a hobby! What a hobby!

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Last edited by Chuckwagon on Thu Apr 03, 2014 09:21, edited 2 times in total.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Carpster » Thu Mar 27, 2014 04:48

Cabonaia wrote:It's a funny thing about resourcefulness. I think most people have a lot of that in them, but it takes something to wake it up. I started out making sausage, and one thing led to another. For years I had wanted to make sausage, but not until I found this forum, and at the same time some good books, did it really take off for me. Now I am hooked, and an evangelist of the craft to my long-suffering friends and relations. Then the sausage got me into raising pigs, which I hadn't always wanted to do. But my wife told me that if we were going to start eating all this pork she wanted better meat. Well, ok. God bless her, now I am crazy about pigs. Then the pigs got me into butchering. Around here, you save $1 a pound by doing it yourself. With a typical pig coming in at 180 lbs. hanging weight, that's a lot! But I never thought that butchering pigs would actually be fun. Maybe fun is not the right word, but you know what I mean. It is satisfying. (It does beat heck out of hacking up chickens.) I guess this is the wrong forum to talk about raising pigs and butchering, but what I mean is, there is something fundamental about growing and cooking and preserving our own food that wakes up pa part of us that might be in our cells from eons of years of our ancestors living that way. In the grand scheme of things, we have been working up our own food for a thousand years and texting our brains out for only 1 minute. I notice that many of the people on this forum make all kinds of things - pickles, sauerkraut, beer, wine, liquor. Once you start down the path of resourcefulness, you are hooked, and one thing leads to another.

Awesome! I couldn't of wrote it better. I thought I was reading something about me. Thanks for sharing.

.
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Post by sambal badjak » Fri Mar 28, 2014 11:50

Just a couplle of questions about the Debreziner:

Is the cure #1 for the fresh sausage optional? Or necessary for the structure of the sausage?

And for the curde, cooked, smoked version:
Can I smoke them at a lower temperature and finish them off in the oven or in hot water?
I have ni temperature control on my smoker

I will have to give the third version a miss, as the ingredients are not available here. I would love to see other people's experiences here!

Time to metricise everything, get some pork and go stuffing :mrgreen:
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sat Mar 29, 2014 16:07

Sambal, you wrote:
Is the cure #1 for the fresh sausage optional? Or necessary for the structure of the sausage?
Hey, hey Ms. Badjak! Will you pardon me for writing some wrong instructions in the recipe? I store thousands of recipes in the computer and was adapting a "fresh" sausage from the recipe of a "cured" sausage and inadvertently included the nitrite curing agent. I`ve repaired the instructions above and hope I didn`t cause you any confusion. Fresh-type sausage, of course, has no nitrite cure added to it. Gosh, Sambal... I was wrong once before - but that was the time I thought I was wrong! :roll:

You also asked:
Can I smoke them at a lower temperature and finish them off in the oven or in hot water?
(I have hi temperature control on my smoker)
Yes, indeed. Good luck with your project. Please let us know how it turns out. Maybe a picture or two?

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by el Ducko » Sun Mar 30, 2014 06:01

Maybe you ("Inquiring Mind" that you are) would like to learn a little more on the cultural background of Debreziner.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debrecener sez, in part,
Click on the above hyperlink. They wrote:A debrecener (Hungarian: debreceni kolbász, German: debreziner Wurst) is a pork sausage of uniform fine texture and reddish-orange colour, named after the Hungarian city of Debrecen. The sausages are heavily spiced with paprika and other seasonings like garlic, pepper and marjoram. They are usually unsmoked or lightly smoked, and sold in pairs joined at one end. Traditional cooking technique calls for the Debreceni to be transversely slashed at intervals and baked, broiled, or fried. The sausage tends to curl away from the slashes, creating a linked series of sausage coins.
To learn a little more about Hungarian sausages (and whet your appetite in the process), have a look at http://easteuropeanfood.about.com/od/hu ... sausag.htm which claims to be "All About Hungarian Sausages." Looks like we have quite a few more sausage types to explore. The Csabaii that we made in the original Project B was outstanding. Debreziner ought to be great.
Duk
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Post by el Ducko » Wed Apr 02, 2014 18:41

Did I tell you the best part about making Debreziner (Kranska)? It's the smells from the "good stuff" paprika, freshly-ground black & white pepper corns, and especially the garlic and garlic.

Yup, I roasted my fresh garlic, just like it said to in the recipe, squished it and mixed it in, then added the garlic granules. Anything that calls for two types of garlic is, in my view, destined to be GREAT! I'm going for the smoked, cooked version. Should be interesting, seeing as how I don't have my good Grizzly stuffer with me. That's okay, though- - I'll do it the old-fashioned (funnel) way. ...or maybe Ross's way, without the casing. (I won't use crab meat, however.) Mine is a small batch.

...but it's going to be LARGE in flavor. Thanks, CW, for the great recipe. ...will try to take a picture or two.

So much for the word from our sponsor, Now back to our regularly-scheduled, action-packed feudin', fussin', fightin' part, starring...
:mrgreen:
Last edited by el Ducko on Wed Apr 02, 2014 18:58, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by el Ducko » Wed Apr 02, 2014 23:59

  • Q: "Hey, Bubbie- - what`s that smudge of smoke, over there on the horizon?"

    A: "Why, it`s the Duck! ...an` he`s smokin` Debreziner sausages! ...an` they`re smellin` good, too! I can almost taste the garlic right now." (smacking sounds...)
Yes, folks, despite having to leave all my equipment back east, I`ve made some Debreziner sausage anyway! The recipe looked so good that I just couldn`t wait. I bought a pound of ground pork, and I bought some bacon ends & pieces. I froze 2.8 ounces of bacon and chopped it up fine, and I carefully measured out the cure and spices, and mixed up a batch.

Stuffing was a problem, and I don`t recommend this at all- - I used a spare stuffer tube from a horn stuffer that didn`t sell in the latest garage sale. It took forever and several breaks to re-chill the mix, but I was determined. I got three decent-sized links out of it, tied `em and hung `em to dry in the drinkerator out back, and got busy with the smoker. But first...

The test patty was delicious!

The smoker is a propane version of the cheapest MasterBuilt, the one I use with an electric hotplate. My controller isn`t here, though, so I set the hotplate up in the smoker, dialed in a setting that I usually use for starting out, and let it pre-heat. I got lucky- - about 138 degF. In went the sausage, to dry for a bit.

What to do for smoke? Well, I`m a confirmed Amazin` addict. Mine isn`t here, so I built a short version out of a metal mustard jar top and some aluminum gutter mesh, loaded it with smoker pellets, and after the usual lighting and re-lighting, got the thing going. Into the smoker it went, to smoke in the "danger zone" (less than 140 degF) for two hours. Don`t worry- - the right amount of cure was added.

It`s coming up on two hours as I write this. The problem is, I can`t raise the temperature in controllable steps, as the recipe calls for. Instead, I`ll pre-heat my oven to 170, which is as low as it will go, and put the sausages in there on a small rack. I`ll monitor the Internal Meat Temperature with a thermocouple temperature gauge until it hits 150 degF, pull `em out, and chill all but one. They will be refrigerated overnight, then frozen. The other one, however, is mine, Mine, MINE! It`s going on the grill right away.

...and now you know what desperation and a little knowhow can drive you to do.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu Apr 03, 2014 00:25

Say hey Duckaroo! Nice report on the Debreziner sausages. And thanks for the kind words too. I was going to send over two men and a boy to help you pull down that handle on the horn stuffer! Those things were made so mankind would not forget how to curse. There is a blue streak of bad language hangin' in the air above my house to this day... it's several years old now.
I'll bet you just can't wait to get back home to your Duk stuffer powered by that 327 Chev engine and water-cooled stainless steel nozzle.
Please let us know how the taste test turns out and post a photo or two! Good luck with your... Hey! ...wait just a minute! Just a cotton-pickin' minute! WHO are you calling a "coot"? What's this? Coot? Coot! Why you double-delirious down factory! You... you... juvenile Duk delinquent! Who are you calling a coot? Where's my 12 gauge? :roll:
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by el Ducko » Thu Apr 03, 2014 02:38

Hmmm... maybe someone ELSE is the desperado, huh?

Here's shot of the surviving two sausages. While the little guy in the picture's back was
turned, "someone" (who, me???) made off with the other one, put it on the grill, and is
gnawing on it even as I write. (Yum.)(Typically, he made off with the good, uniform-length
one instead of the "runt.")
Image
I'll tell you what- - this recipe is a home run, whatever that is in Hungarian. The two
hours of smoke turned out to be perfect. I'll lower the salt a little if I use bacon next time,
instead of fat back, but as soon as I can get my mitts back on my equipment, I'm
doing this one again!
Good job, ya ol' coot!
:mrgreen:
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.
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