prosciutto

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cathouse willy
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prosciutto

Post by cathouse willy » Wed Oct 17, 2018 03:13

So this is by far my most ambitious go at charcuterie. Using Len Poli's recipe it's just past 4 weeks of salt curing in the fridge. Next step 12 months in the chamber at 58 f and 70% rh, talk about commitment.I had the butcher remove some of the shank end and debone it as my fridge space is limited.Here's hoping for a good outcome! Image[/img]
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StefanS
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Post by StefanS » Thu Oct 18, 2018 13:28

cathouse willy wrote:Using Len Poli's recipe it's just past 4 weeks of salt curing in the fridge.
I do not know that recipe so - did you use Cure #2? Do you plan use "sugna" - mean covering lean meat part with it? - (from my experience if not , you will have a "very nice" dry ring). Additional advice - whole piece should be wrapped very tight in cords - after bone is removed any cavity inside (even small one) can end with rotting process or mold grove inside cavity.
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Thu Oct 18, 2018 14:44

Just curios. Was the skin and fat cap removed and then tied back on?
cathouse willy
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Post by cathouse willy » Thu Oct 18, 2018 17:50

The fat cap and skin were left on the leg and it was tied tightly. The string has loosened during the month of salt curing in the fridge.I did use cure #2 and I will be applying sugna after 3 months of drying. This is all new to me so I'm following the recipe and method closely.
link here
http://lpoli.50webs.com/index_files/Pro ... 0Parma.pdf
cathouse willy
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Re: prosciutto

Post by cathouse willy » Mon Apr 29, 2019 01:04

It's been six months since the cured leg went into the dryer and It's down to 7 lbs from the original 10 lbs.Len Poli's recipe talks about testing with a horse bone needle. I can't find such a thing and I'd really like to know how the inside smells. can anyone direct me to a place to purchase one or is there another way to test for spoilage?
Thanks
Bill
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Re: prosciutto

Post by jrittvo » Mon Apr 29, 2019 02:32

https://butcherspantry.com/product/auth ... ther-case/

Only one I've ever seen for sale. Expensive, and I think it takes quite some experience to know what the different smells mean, but you gotta start somewhere if that's your goal . . .
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Re: prosciutto

Post by LOUSANTELLO » Mon Apr 29, 2019 13:05

I've made about 6 prosciutto a while ago, and let's just say I will most likely not make it again. I made a couple of them by removing the bone prior to salting, and others by leaving the bone in until completed. Pressing was a pain. Not only that, but you're waiting 1 year not knowing whether it spoiled or not. Last year, I took the whole leg and cut straight down where the bone is. The one side is the culatello and the other side is the fiocco muscle. At this point, the bone is gone. Roll the culatello and tie it like a roast, salt it, rinse it and stuff it into a hog bladder. The outcome is more predictable, and it isn't any harder than making a cappicola. No pressing needed and the slices end up round. That's my "go to" whole muscle now.
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Re: prosciutto

Post by redzed » Wed May 01, 2019 23:09

I have a couple hanging. One is 2yrs and 4 months and the other is exactly one year younger. Thanks for reminding me. I think I'll finally cut into that older one in the next few days. And I also agree with Lou. Culatello is easier to manage and as long as you tie it properly, guaranteed success everytime. It's ready after 10 - 12 months, easy to slice and downright delicious.
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