Ferment sausage in a bowl, not casing?

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bkshafer
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Ferment sausage in a bowl, not casing?

Post by bkshafer » Sat Jul 06, 2013 19:34

Is there any reason not to ferment sausage in a bowl and then stuff as opposed to stuffing then fermenting?
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Re: Ferment sausage in a bowl, not casing?

Post by ssorllih » Sat Jul 06, 2013 20:14

bkshafer wrote:Is there any reason not to ferment sausage in a bowl and then stuff as opposed to stuffing then fermenting?


Fermentation is one of the steps that requires close monitoring and is usually carried seamlessly into the drying and aging phase.
But why would you want to do that?
Ross- tightwad home cook
bkshafer
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Post by bkshafer » Thu Jul 11, 2013 15:04

I currently have stuff drying in my drying/fermentation chamber. I would like to make some more stuff to dry but I don't have a seperate fermentation chamber. It would be easy to control the temperature of something fermenting in a covered bowl for a couple days then stuff, instead of stuffing then having to worry about temperature and humidity.
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Post by ssorllih » Thu Jul 11, 2013 15:13

Just slow down a little. My life long motto is: "Make Haste Slowly".
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Post by Chuckwagon » Fri Jul 12, 2013 01:39

I would like to make some more stuff to dry but I don't have a seperate fermentation chamber.
Now you know the dilemma of most every other fermented-sausage maker :lol:
Bacteria cultures were and are a boon to the commercial sausage-making industry for this very reason. This is mostly the reason America has developed its taste for overly "sour" or super "tangy" fermented meat products - it is the quickest culture and takes only a matter of hours to develop.
In northern Europe, the fermentation period is much longer (up to three months!) and the subtle, flavor of the final product is very much worth the wait. Cultures are still used, but they also enhance flavor and color over a period of time.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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