Something different

User avatar
Gray Goat
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 125
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 20:08
Location: Crystal Lake IL

Something different

Post by Gray Goat » Mon May 19, 2014 02:20

I have been working on this for a few years and I think I have it dialed in.

6lbs of ground beef
Image

11lbs of BONE IN, skin on chicken thighs
Image

Finished grinding and time for some water
Image
Image

Now for some dehydrated fruits and veggies
Image

All mixed up and ready for a night in the fridge. Tomorrow I will begin stuffing......
Image

....begin stuffing into these
Image
Image

:lol: :lol: :lol: Yep, it's dog food. I can't let my poochies miss out on the good chow :grin:
Carpster
User
User
Posts: 75
Joined: Fri Dec 27, 2013 01:32
Location: Mo.

Post by Carpster » Mon May 19, 2014 02:35

:shock:
Tasso
User
User
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 02:15
Location: Texas

Post by Tasso » Mon May 19, 2014 04:50

Raw feeding? Or do you cook it before you feed it to them? How do your poochies like it?
User avatar
Gray Goat
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 125
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 20:08
Location: Crystal Lake IL

Post by Gray Goat » Mon May 19, 2014 05:25

Tasso wrote:Raw feeding? Or do you cook it before you feed it to them? How do your poochies like it?
It is a raw diet and they love it. They are both in great health and full of energy :grin:
Tasso
User
User
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 02:15
Location: Texas

Post by Tasso » Mon May 19, 2014 06:12

They sure look happy and healthy! That diet must be good for them.

I may try feeding a raw food diet if I decide to have another dog in my life down the road. My old girl is a 15 year old Chihuahua, and she is not in tip-top health anymore. I looked into raw feeding a while back, but decided against a dramatic change to her diet at this stage in her life. I don't doubt she'd enjoy it, though.

Edit: I forgot to ask... How does your grinder deal with the chicken bones and all that soft skin? What plate sizes are you using?
User avatar
Gray Goat
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 125
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 20:08
Location: Crystal Lake IL

Post by Gray Goat » Mon May 19, 2014 16:04

The grinder handles it well but I do keep two blades
One for dog food and the other for sausage making.
I use the biggest plate I have which is 3/8
User avatar
sawhorseray
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 1104
Joined: Fri Jul 27, 2012 20:25
Location: Elk Grove, CA

Post by sawhorseray » Mon May 19, 2014 16:06

Well done GG, I can feel the love! I cooked chicken and rice for my beloved ESS, Doodles, for over 13 years, even ate it myself a couple of times. What kind of dehydrated veggies? RAY
“Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment.”
User avatar
Bob K
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2023
Joined: Sun Jun 02, 2013 15:16
Location: Northwest Ct

Post by Bob K » Mon May 19, 2014 16:44

Good one!!

Wow well fed dogs.

Ross can add those casings to his list of alternatives.

CW can comment on the fermenting process.
User avatar
Gray Goat
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 125
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 20:08
Location: Crystal Lake IL

Post by Gray Goat » Mon May 19, 2014 22:39

Chuckwagon wrote:
CW can comment on the fermenting process.
Heck, my Shelties are just furry children.
That's exactly WHY I feed them raw :grin:

To some people this may indeed seem like a radical thing to do but I did my research before going in this direction. I also talked at great length to our Holistic vet who has dogs that are 19 and 17 yrs old and have been eating raw their whole lives.

Dogs have a very different GI tract that allows them to eat many things that would put us down for the count.

Extra care is needed when handling, but no more then when making sausage. Their bowls are cleaned every day and we haven't had any problems so far.

After seeing test results of what is in some of the popular kibble products, going raw was an easy decision to make
Janlab
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 121
Joined: Sat Dec 14, 2013 05:11
Location: Albany, Western Australia

Post by Janlab » Mon May 19, 2014 22:48

The "Raw meaty bone" diet supplemented with vegetables and oats is well known. Large dogs can chew animal bones, but chicken such as wings and necks work best for small dogs. We use it too, but we do not make a mix, we just defrost a neck or two in the fridge before giving it to our small dog, he does the grinding with his teeth. He also eats carrots, apples and bananas. ( preferring meat of course!).
It is very good for the canine digestive system.
Jan L
User avatar
Gray Goat
Frequent User
Frequent User
Posts: 125
Joined: Mon Jan 24, 2011 20:08
Location: Crystal Lake IL

Post by Gray Goat » Mon May 19, 2014 23:07

Janlab wrote:The "Raw meaty bone" diet supplemented with vegetables and oats is well known. Large dogs can chew animal bones, but chicken such as wings and necks work best for small dogs. We use it too, but we do not make a mix, we just defrost a neck or two in the fridge before giving it to our small dog, he does the grinding with his teeth. He also eats carrots, apples and bananas. ( preferring meat of course!).
It is very good for the canine digestive system.
Jan L

I too will give them a turkey or chicken neck for chewing. The ripping and tearing of the cartilage and connective tissues does wonders for their teeth

In my opinion, much better than raw hide chews :grin:
Gulyás
Passionate
Passionate
Posts: 459
Joined: Sat Aug 18, 2012 19:58
Location: Wisconsin

Post by Gulyás » Tue May 20, 2014 02:05

Well, some people eat dog food, and some dog eat,........well beef, and chicken........ :mrgreen:
Failure to prepare is preparing to fail.
User avatar
Chuckwagon
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4494
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 04:51
Location: Rocky Mountains

Post by Chuckwagon » Tue May 20, 2014 06:41

Hi Gray Goat, you little ol' devil you! :lol:
I previously wrote this:
Hi Guys. I`ve raised Shetland Sheepdogs in pairs (siblings) ever since I was a kid. I`m a dog lover from way back.
My concerns with raw chicken is with salmonella, campylobacter, and e.coli. There are other bacteria and microorganisms to be concerned with also. Allow me to remind you what this stuff does; it put me in the hospital.

My first question is WHY would you want to feed RAW chicken to anyone or any animal? Heck, my Shelties are just furry children. Why would I feed them raw chicken?

Perhaps we should remind ourselves that now, MOST chicken in the USA is infected with salmonella bacteria when you open the package from the grocery store. Salmonella bacteria from raw and undercooked chicken leads to a condition called salmonellosis. If infected, you'll probably experience symptoms within 6 to 72 hours after consuming the contaminated food. Symptoms are typically related to your gastrointestinal tract. You might suffer from severe diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea and possibly vomiting. Headaches, chills, fatigue and fever are also often associated with salmonellosis.

We should also remember that in minced or comminuted meat, the problems with spreading the pathogenic bacteria only increase due to the exposure of so many new surfaces as the meat is cut. In just a few short hours, the bacterial count increases dramatically.

Symptoms usually resolve within four to seven days, but your body will have lost a large amount of fluid. Staying well-hydrated is essential. Pregnant women may be especially sensitive to pathogenic bacteria from raw chicken. In some instances the body is not always able to recover from the symptoms and consuming undercooked or raw chicken can even be fatal. Cross-contamination is also a major factor in spreading Salmonella bacteria. When chicken is raw or undercooked, any surfaces it touches will become contaminated. Be sure to wash all utensils and cutting boards.

My advice? Please COOK IT!

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Gray Goat, you wrote:
Dogs have a very different GI tract that allows them to eat many things that would put us down for the count. Extra care is needed when handling, but no more then when making sausage. Their bowls are cleaned every day and we haven't had any problems so far. After seeing test results of what is in some of the popular kibble products, going raw was an easy decision to make
Okay pal, I hate to cloud up and rain all over you, but Salmonellosis, caused by the Salmonella bacteria, may indeed be found in cats and dogs. Check with any bacteriologist. It often leads to disorders, including gastroenteritis, spontaneous abortions, and septicemia. This bacterial disease is also zoonotic. It can be transmitted to humans and there are more than 2,000 different types of this Gram-negative enterobacteria. Typically, a host animal carrying the disease will have two or more different microorganisms or types of Salmonellae bacteria that cause this disease. Risk factors include the dog's age, with younger and older animals most at risk due to their underdeveloped and/or compromised immune systems. Similarly, dogs with weak immune systems or immature gastrointestinal tracts are at risk. The severity of the disease will often determine the signs and symptoms that are overtly present in the dog. Symptoms commonly seen in dogs with salmonellosis include fever, shock, lethargy, diarrhea, vomiting, anorexia, weight loss, dehydration, skin disease, mucus in stool, and an abnormally fast heart rate. The dog may also display swollen lymph nodes, an abnormal vaginal discharge, and even miscarriage or spontaneous abortion. Chronic forms of salmonellosis may include fever, weight loss, loss of blood, intermittent diarrhea lasting three or four weeks, and non-intestinal infections.

My concern yet lies in the fact that today`s chicken found at your local supermarket is, more often than not, contaminated with solmanellae bacteria. The genus belongs to the same family as Escherichia, which includes the species E.coli. From only two species of Salmonella, Salmonella bongori and Salmonella enterica, there are six subspecies but they have innumerable serotypes. One of them even causes typhoid fever! :shock: I still say, cook raw chicken! Please don't risk the health of those beautiful dogs.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
User avatar
redzed
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 3201
Joined: Fri Apr 20, 2012 06:29
Location: Vancouver Island

Post by redzed » Tue May 20, 2014 07:03

Hmm, I have been looking into ways of getting rid of a neighbourhood cat that makes a mess in my flowerbeds and kills California quail chicks......Image Will have to keep my eye out on chicken specials. Thanks CW. :cool:
User avatar
Chuckwagon
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 4494
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 04:51
Location: Rocky Mountains

Post by Chuckwagon » Tue May 20, 2014 07:37

Naw Red, too harsh and uncomfortable. Just eat lots of raw garlic then go next door. Start peeing on your neighbors welcome mat, and when he comes out, put your arm around his neck and tell him he`s going for a walk with you. Show him your shredded flowers and tell him about the baby chicks and try to convince him what a peace-loving person you are. Firmly, let him know that his cat won`t be tolerated in your yard anymore and if it does indeed return, there will be certain "difficulties and consequences" arising within his family. Then have him bring his entire brood over for a barbecue and see if they can guess what the "mystery meat" is on the grill. :shock:
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
Post Reply