Equalization under vacuum

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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Sat Nov 22, 2014 17:59

Phil-
I believe you are referring to the beginning of the curing process where distribution (equalization) of the curing salt is taking place.


The other Folks are talking about the end game....more of a moisture distribution process.
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Shuswap
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Post by Shuswap » Sat Nov 22, 2014 18:08

Bob K wrote:Phil-
I believe you are referring to the beginning of the curing process where distribution (equalization) of the curing salt is taking place.


The other Folks are talking about the end game....more of a moisture distribution process.
I suppose I'm reading this article wrong but it appears that equalization is after curing. Have a look:
http://www.meatsandsausages.com/hams-ot ... ts/country
Phil
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Sat Nov 22, 2014 18:29

Phil, this thread was started with a discussion of equalization of moisture in dry cured products as a last step. Is a rather unconventional process in vac packing the product. It often helps in eliminating or reducing some of the dry rim or case hardening. So we are talking apples and oranges here. What you are referring to is a process used in curing when the solid muscle meats are given a period of time, after the initial curing stage is completed, and the remaining salts are washed or brushed off the exterior. This stage is referred as "equalization" so that the salts and nitrates/nitrites distribute themselves equally throughout the muscle tissue.

Marianski better describes it here:(http://www.meatsandsausages.com/hams-other-meats/dry)

3. Equalizing/Resting. Hams are rinsed with tap water and any residual salt is brushed off from the surface. Then they are hung or placed on the shelf for salt equalization. This step takes 1-2 months depending on the size of the ham and other factors. The humidity is decreased as the drying continues. This step resembles drying fermented sausages. Due to the accumulation of salt inside, hams are bacteriologically more stable and will become more stable due to the continuous evaporation of moisture. Salt diffuses to all areas of the product and drying continues.

Equalizing and resting is essential for:

Development of a proper color.

Development of flavor. The flavor should depend on the natural flavor of the meat itself and not on adding a variety of spices. The aroma of spices will not last for six months or longer and those are the times needed to make those products. The final flavor is the result of naturally occurring reactions inside of the meat and fats as well.
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Shuswap
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Post by Shuswap » Sat Nov 22, 2014 18:57

Chris - we actually don't disagree. Search "equalization of moisture in meat processing" and the third hit is Marianski's article on dry curing ham and the role of equalization. I believe the bloke who used the term "eqaulization of moisture" created the confusion. I'm done - going to the shop to make sawdust.
Phil
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