Trichinella in wild boars

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sawhorseray
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Post by sawhorseray » Sun Nov 16, 2014 05:25

markjass wrote:Interesting comments. I know next to nothing about Trichinosis. Can the larve be seen by the naked eye?from Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trichinosis
Between 2002 and 2007, 11 cases were reported to CDC each year on average in the United States;[2] these were mostly the result of eating undercooked game, bear meat, or home-reared pigs. It is common in developing countries where meat fed to pigs is raw or undercooked, but many cases also come from developed countries in Europe and North America,[clarification needed] where raw or undercooked pork and wild game may be consumed as delicacies.[3]Also from the same article:
Larvae may be killed by the heating or irradiation of raw meat. Freezing is only usually effective for T. spiralis, since other species, such as T. nativa, are freeze resistant and can survive long-term freezing.
Easy answer? Spice it up and cook in till it's properly done. Never a problem with carnitas or pulled pork, medium-rare is for beef steaks. RAY
“Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment.”
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Sun Nov 16, 2014 13:40

markjass wrote:Larvae may be killed by the heating or irradiation of raw meat. Freezing is only usually effective for T. spiralis, since other species, such as T. nativa, are freeze resistant and can survive long-term freezing.
Can the other species such as T.nativia infect domestic pigs also?
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Post by NorthFork » Sun Nov 16, 2014 14:47

Bob,

Here is a link that helps some with this dilemma---
http://www.trichinellosis.org/Distribut ... smiss.html

There is so much conflicting information on all of this that it is difficult to be completely sure of anything. I think Ray has the best solution, if it's not from a source known to be parasite free(such as commercially raised pork), cook it well. I have a friend who is a micro biologist at one of our major universities and from his experience in the field and lab (Vet. Lab) if it eats meat from an infected animal it can and will be infected. T. Nativa is not common in domestic animals but has been detected domestics. The distribution is also considerably larger than is generally shown. As far as the "freeze resistant" factor, some studies indicate this is due to the host animals blood character while others indicate the parasite itself is resistant to freezing-I don't know which is correct but personally take no chances--

Pat
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Sun Nov 16, 2014 16:01

Thanks Pat
Yea its always a dilemma for me as I get all the backfat I can use from farm raised pigs for nothing and use it in my dry cured salamis.
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Thu Dec 18, 2014 00:57

Here is a report about trichinellosis spirallis in wild boars from Spain. After our discussion here and this incident, it shows that the danger lurks and that the warnings are real.

http://www.foodsafetywatch.org/news/tri ... n-belgium/
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