Problem with starter culture - BL-C 007

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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Fri Apr 13, 2018 16:05

cajuneric wrote:So whats the reccomended ferment time on BLC?
Read what LOU has to say on the first page of this string as he has it down pat.

I see the temp ranges from 50f to 80f (80 being optimal)
Yes well every strain of bacteria has its optimal temp for growth...it is not necessarily the optimal temp for the sausage you are making.

Is TSPX better for flavor and color development?
In MHO yes. As long as you are making a slow fermented S. European type sausage with that funky, cheesy aroma and taste.......That's what it was designed to do!!!
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Sat Apr 14, 2018 04:42

What was your starting pH? A 5.7 reading will result in a lower pH than a 5.9. Read what I drafted a few days ago. There are many factors that will affect the final pH of the sausage.
http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.ph ... 57dd#39827
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Post by cajuneric » Sat Apr 14, 2018 05:27

redzed
What was your starting pH?
It was 5.9

I read that a few days ago. I made lots of notes. Thanks for posting that info.
My issue was assuming that blc 007 was a slow ferment culture. Now that I realize it is not I have this on lock!!! 24- 30 hours max with 2-3 % dextrose and we are in that low 5.1 range :mrgreen:
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Post by redzed » Sat Apr 14, 2018 08:19

I wrote numerous times here about going down to 5 and even 4.9 with 3g/kg of dextrose and fermenting at 21C. But I have not given up on 007 yet. In my next salami I intend to ferment at 18 -19 and will use 1g dextrose, 1g sucrose and 1g maltose. Not all bacteria in set will metabolise maltose but it will slow down the fermentation.
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Post by cajuneric » Sat Apr 14, 2018 17:11

so is it a bad thing if the ph gets down to 4.9?

I just took the ph of the meat I made a few days ago. (Genoa and Cremona). Apparently the ph continued to drop in the during chamber at 55F. It is now 4.95 for both.

What does that mean for flavor?

Perhaps .2% dextrose and .2% is too much. Maybe Red using .3% total sugar like you stated earlier but mixing it up might be the way to go..

I think I'm all capped out on space but as soon as I have some more room I'll try that method and see what happens.


Also I notices that the Genoa force meat and the Cremona Force meat had different textures. The Genoa was more firm and the Cremona was much softer. Is that simply because of the ingredients used in the recipe?
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Sat Apr 14, 2018 17:26

I am puzzled. Why does everyone want to use a culture that was made for fast fermenting to make a slow fermented product?
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Post by cajuneric » Sat Apr 14, 2018 17:30

I just want to keep it above 5.0. That seems to be my issue...
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Post by Bob K » Sat Apr 14, 2018 18:02

cajuneric wrote:Also I notices that the Genoa force meat and the Cremona Force meat had different textures. The Genoa was more firm and the Cremona was much softer. Is that simply because of the ingredients used in the recipe?
The difference is the Beef. In both texture and color.

If you want to get the full benefit of the color, flavor forming and nitrate reducing bacteria you need to keep the Ph above 5.0 or for as long as possible. Below that they slow down or stop working. Not the end of the world if it happens as you will still have a nice sausage.

To keep it above 5.0 keep fiddling with the sugar amounts and temp..or use a culture that is more predictable.
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Post by Saltedtyme30 » Tue Jul 03, 2018 16:34

Bob K, can you send me link to mixing I. Starter culture ? I remember a thread saying something about mixing it until seeing legs and what happens if over mixed. Second day trying to take ph of meat in the ferment box it was so stiff it wouldn`t come apart easily to do a slurry test
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Post by Bob K » Tue Jul 03, 2018 16:58

Is your question about mixing meat or testing Ph? For a slurry for testing Ph just use a blender or hand mixer.
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Post by Saltedtyme30 » Tue Jul 03, 2018 16:59

Bob K, i meant mixing it with meat. Stringy effect
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Post by reddal » Thu Jul 05, 2018 10:16

I have the same pH meter - but with the meat probe sensor which avoids the need to make a slurry. I find this saves a huge amount of time - as I like to test several times during fermentation so when you have several different batches each to be tested several times then the slurry method is a grind.

Maybe one day I'll have everything about the whole process nailed down enough that I can ferment a fixed time and only test once to make sure - but I guess there will always be variations in input meat pH and temperature etc which are hard to account for.
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