[USA] "Chuckwagon's Beer Brats"

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Chuckwagon
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sun Dec 01, 2013 09:17

right about 22% fat, up to 25%.
That's the magic! We need to have rather a high content to have the right "chew". The fat lubricates the lean as we chew it.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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sawhorseray
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Post by sawhorseray » Sun Dec 01, 2013 18:26

I'd only made brats a couple of times in small batches due to the fact my wife said she didn't like them, tho she'd never tried them. Women! The other night we went to a indian casino buffet where they had a tray of brats sliced in about thirds in a brown gravy sauce. My gal tried a bite of mine and went back for her own plate, she absolutely loved them. I'll be pounding out a more sizeable batch in short order. Glad to see CW's recipe calls for beef chuck rather than veal as in Rytecs recipe. RAY
“Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment.”
jscarbo
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Post by jscarbo » Tue Feb 25, 2014 17:38

Hi, I'm a new member and am just getting started with sausage making, although I'm a very experienced cook. I've decided to concentrate on three styles of fresh sausage while I'm learning - American Breakfast Sausage, Italian Sausage and Bratwurst. I've been pouring over recipes and techniques on this site as well as other internet resources and sausage-making books. My first efforts haven't turned out too bad but there's room for improvement and I'd like to try a few variations before finalizing my formulations and recipes.

Chuckwagon's beer bratwurst recipe is very similar to one I recently made except for the addition of soy protein concentrate and beer. I like beer brats and would like to try to make them but am curious about what to expect from the soy protein concentrate. Is it primarily a binder? How much of an effect should it have on the texture and taste of the final product? Can I leave it out or substitute something else such as dry milk powder? This is important to know because I completely agree with CW's advice to beginners that you should follow the recipes without making changes to them. However, I live in Central America and am not sure how easy it will be to find the soy protein concentrate locally. I can get soy protein isolate such as this one sold by GNC, but I don't think it's what the recipe is calling for: http://www.gnc.com/GNC-SuperFoods-Soy-P ... d=18194986

Thanks for any advice and suggestions.
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Chuckwagon
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Post by Chuckwagon » Wed Feb 26, 2014 04:52

Jscarbo, you wrote:
am curious about what to expect from the soy protein concentrate. Is it primarily a binder? How much of an effect should it have on the texture and taste of the final product? Can I leave it out or substitute something else such as dry milk powder?

The difference between soy protein concentrate and dry milk powder? Hmmm. Interesting question! Let me try to provide some pros and cons regarding the stuff. The Journal Of Lipid Research has recently published a most interesting article regarding oxysterols also known as "oxidized cholesterol". The article in entitled, "Oxidized Cholesterol In The Diet - A Source Of Oxidized Lipoproteins In Humans" and may be found here:http://www.jlr.org/content/44/4/705.full

While milk powders contain all twenty-one standard amino acids (the building blocks of proteins), and are high in soluble vitamins and minerals, they also contain "oxidized cholesterol" - the worst type of cholesterol! Thus, the heated debate about NFDM goes on, even though most of the cholesterol in your body does not come from the food you eat, rather, it is manufactured by your own liver. Opponents yet cite the presence of oxysterols along with high carbohydrate and high fat content. (By the way, fresh fruits and vegetables are rich in antioxidants - your best defense against oxidized cholesterol).

In 1984, three years before "defatted soy flour" was developed by PTI, Rytek Kutas (referring to non-fat dry milk) wrote on page 159 of his revised edition book, "If you are going to use a non-fat dry milk for a binder, your local dairy is usually the only place you can buy it today. The milk has to be a very fine powder and not the granules used for making milk at home. Better still, it should have the consistency of corn starch."

Okay, a few years have passed since then. Let`s look at the Non Fat Dry Milk of today. It contains:
36% protein
52% carbohydrates (mostly lactose)
1.3% calcium
1.8% potassium
26-40% fat
5-7% ash (minerals)

Proponents point out that although NFDM does not quite have the binding power of soy protein, non-fat dry milk powder is half lactose (sugar) and is often used in making fermented type "dry-cured" sausages such as salami and pepperoni. Why? It is ideal in supplying essential sugar to the lactic acid producing bacteria pediococcus acidilactici and lactobacillus curvatus. Although it is 36% protein, it is also known for improving the taste of low-fat sausages.

On the other hand, soy protein is often used in sausage making as a binder (not to be confused as a filler). As comminuted meat and fat particles are covered with the fine powder (having the consistency of corn starch), soy protein prevents fats from amalgamating and its water-holding ability only increases the firmness of a meat product. The amount added should not exceed 2-1/2% as the flavor of sausage becomes altered, most people calling it "beany" tasting.

Soy protein concentrate is produced by immobilizing soy globulin proteins while allowing soluble carbohydrates to be leached from the defatted flakes along with whey and salts. With these removed, soy protein flour remains. Now, there is a lot of technical saddle-bum science going on to further create edible soy protein concentrate and it involves the removal of specific aqueous acids in something called the isoelectric zone of minimum protein solubility. And no kidding... it is achieved by the use of... (ta da)... alcohol! Long story short, the consumer winds up with soyprotein concentrate at about 70% protein and it binds 4 part of water. Very helpful stuff in the food world. However, it contains a few other additives, including ash and fiber. Don`t ask me why. Shucks, there`s even 1% oil in the stuff. Shucks pard, it also takes one ton of defatted soybean flour to make 1653 pounds of soy protein concentrate. The list of the uses for soy protein concentrate in every industry you can imagine today is as long as my list of excuses for avoiding my wife`s relatives!

In defence of soy protein, Stan Marianski has pointed out that it contains all three nutrients required for healthy nutrition - protein, carbohydrate, and fat - plus the benefits of vitamins and minerals, including calcium, folic acid, and iron. Soy is nearly nutritionally equivalent to meat! It`s oil is 61% polyunsaturated and 24% monounsaturated fat - comparable to the total unsaturated fat content of other vegetable oil. And ... it contains NO cholesterol.

For people who are lactose intolerant (me included), the development of soy protein concentrate and soy protein isolate are a Godsend and very much appreciated. Many of us don`t have a choice, but for those who do, I suggest trying both and weighing the facts listed above. Then make up your own mind.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
jscarbo
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Post by jscarbo » Wed Feb 26, 2014 18:08

Thanks, Chuckwagon, for such an informative answer. I'll try to find soy protein concentrate as specified in the recipe. If not, I guess I'll try soy flour or powdered milk. Incidentally, the powdered milk I'm familiar with here is powdered whole milk, not non-fat. I haven't had a chance to look for the non-fat variety but would think it's available. If not, I can't see why the powdered whole milk wouldn't be an acceptable substitute.

One of my greatest challenges in getting started with sausage making here in Costa Rica has been the difficulty in finding some of the supplies I need. I ordered my meat grinder from Amazon and had it shipped by private courier. The shipping and customs duty were more than the cost of the grinder, but I had no choice. I'll probably eventually buy a dedicated sausage stuffer but for now I can get by with the stuffer attachment for my grinder.

I also can't find local sources for fennel seed, mace, and a few other seasonings. Fortunately, I have a small supply of fennel seed on hand and can order whatever spices and seasonings I need from the US. Even getting sausage casings was a challenge although I've finally found a source for DeWied hog casings and the same supplier says he can get small collagen casings for breakfast sausages if I want them.

I'm working my way through the Project B2 tutorial and it's been very helpful. Also, I appreciate the recommendation of the Marianski book. I'd looked at a sample of the ebook edition on Amazon but thought it was perhaps too technical and detailed for a beginner and instead, I bought Ruhlman and Polcyn's "Charcuterie". It's a fine book but I can see the benefit of studying Marianski as well and will buy it today.
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Post by bmeyer50 » Fri Oct 03, 2014 16:21

Oh yes, about the beer. Why lager over pilsner? It`s all about fermenting. Most non-lager beers undergo a process called "top fermentation", whereby yeast floats on top of the wort (grain mashed in hot water), which is exposed to oxygen and kept warm. Oxygen and warmth persuade yeast to produce spicy, astringent flavor compounds called phenols and fruity, floral compounds called esters that are desirable in beer but not in food.
Lagers, on the other hand, undergo "bottom fermentation" where the yeast is kept submerged in the low-oxygen environment at the bottom of the wort at colder temperatures, which causes the yeast to produce fewer phenols and esters, so that the yeast and sulfur flavors come forward

I have to disagree with you...I've been brewing beer for about 20 years, and Ales use top fermenting yeast, and as you stated, lagers do use bottom fermenting yeast, BUT a Pilsner, whether Bohemium, German or Czech, use a lager yeast, so technically a Pilsner is a lager. :wink:
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