[USA] Authentic Polish Kielbasa (Hot Smoked)

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Chuckwagon
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[USA] Authentic Polish Kielbasa (Hot Smoked)

Post by Chuckwagon » Thu Mar 29, 2012 06:27

Authentic Polish Kielbasa (Hot Smoked)
(10 lb. Formula)

Easter is just around the corner and in many homes traditional kielbasa is made as part of the celebration. Did you know that Polish Kielbasa (smoked sausage) was an all-pork recipe until 1964? That`s the year the Polish government decided to allow 20% beef into the product. The only other ingredients in the traditional recipe are salt, sugar, pepper, garlic, and marjoram.

Pork Butt...... 10 lbs. @ 32° F.
Salt...... 4-1/2 Tbl.Spns.
Cure #1...... 2 tspns.
Pepper...... 1-1/2 Tbl.Spns.
Sugar...... 2 tspns.
Garlic...... 4 large or 5 medium cloves
Marjoram...... 3 tspns.
Water...... 1 cup
32-35 mm. hog casings

Place the grinder knife and plate into the freezer while you separate the fat from the lean meat using a sharp knife. Cut the meat into 1" cubes to keep long strands of sinew from wrapping around the auger behind the plate as the meat is ground. Grind the meat using a 3/8" plate and the pork fat using a 3/16" plate. Place the fat into the freezer while you mix the Cure #1 with a little water (for uniform distribution) and add it to the meat. Work with small batches, refrigerating the meat at every opportunity. Next, mix the meat with all the remaining ingredients (except the frozen fat), kneading the mixture to develop the proteins myosin and actin, creating a "sticky meat paste" (primary bind). Finally, fold in the frozen fat and distribute it equally throughout the mixture. Depending upon various recipes or preferences, the sausage may now be refrigerated several hours for maturing, or the sausage may be immediately stuffed into casings to avoid smearing while the fat remains frozen.

Stuff the sausage into 32-36 mm. hog casings, allowing them to hang and dry at room temperature for an hour or place them into a smokehouse preheated to 130°F. (54°C.) for an hour with the damper fully open to assist with moisture elimination. When the sausages are dry to the touch, introduce hickory smoke and adjust the damper to only 1/4 the way open. Gradually, only a couple of degrees at twenty minutes intervals, raise the smokehouse temperature until the internal meat temperature (IMT) registers 152°F. (67°C.). This procedure must be done slowly to avoid breaking the collagen and liquefying the fat. Remove the sausages, showering them with cold water until the IMT drops to less than 90°F. (32°C.). This sausage remains perishable and must be refrigerated.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
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Post by rgauthier20420 » Mon Oct 06, 2014 14:42

I used this recipe over the weekend to make some polish kielbasa. A very good recipe. I used 3 tbs of garlic powder instead of the fresh garlic. The final product has a nice salt, pepper, and garlic balance in my opinion. Very nice!

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Post by Shuswap » Mon Oct 06, 2014 14:59

They look very enticing - the mix looks great and I would like my links to be so evenly stuffed.
Phil
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Post by rgauthier20420 » Mon Oct 06, 2014 15:02

Thanks Phil. I've gotten pretty good over the last couple batches of stuffing by myself with one hand on the crank and one hand on the stuffing tube with the casings. I put a little pressure on the casings as I crank so they don't just run off the horn with the meat. This technique seems to work nicely for me so far.
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Post by redzed » Mon Oct 06, 2014 15:59

Very nice job on the sausage! Proof that you can make a tasty product without binders, other additives and a thousand spices. And you can definitely call this sausage Kiełbasa Polska!
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Post by rgauthier20420 » Mon Oct 06, 2014 16:09

Thanks Red. I typically don't use binders when I make sausage. I actually bought some dried skin milk with the intention of grinding it to a fine powder and using it in a batch, but I never did. The only thing it gets used for now is in my protein shakes :cool:
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Post by cogboy » Mon Oct 06, 2014 23:00

Very nice product , nice job!
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Post by bmeyer50 » Mon Oct 06, 2014 23:36

yummmmm! I need practice with my link size as well!
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Post by ursula » Tue Oct 07, 2014 04:37

Chris, where do you find those wonderful animations?!!!!
Love it!
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Post by redzed » Tue Oct 07, 2014 06:54

rgauthier20420 wrote: I actually bought some dried skin milk with the intention of grinding it to a fine powder and using it in a batch, but I never did.
Geez, I'm glad you didn't use that dried skin! :shock: :shock: Where the heck are you getting your recipes, a medieval guide to witchcraft? Now, if you send me a link of that splendid looking kielbasa, I'll edit your post. :lol:
ursula wrote:Chris, where do you find those wonderful animations?!!!!


Hi Ursula, I find them all over, mostly on free emoticon sites. BTW, you've been quiet lately as far as updates on your curing adventures. I hope you haven't given up!

Chris
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Post by rgauthier20420 » Tue Oct 07, 2014 14:14

redzed wrote:
rgauthier20420 wrote: I actually bought some dried skin milk with the intention of grinding it to a fine powder and using it in a batch, but I never did.
Geez, I'm glad you didn't use that dried skin! :shock: :shock: Where the heck are you getting your recipes, a medieval guide to witchcraft? Now, if you send me a link of that splendid looking kielbasa, I'll edit your post. :lol:

Chris
Haha oops. That's supposed to be skim :roll:

A link to the kielbasa? I used the recipe above. Which link should are you asking for? This one?

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Post by Bob K » Tue Oct 07, 2014 15:51

A link of kielbasa. :wink:
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Post by rgauthier20420 » Tue Oct 07, 2014 15:59

Bob K wrote:A link of kielbasa. :wink:

Hahaha ahhhhh :shock:
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Post by ursula » Wed Oct 08, 2014 09:20

Hi CHris,
I ended up making 7 different salamis, which were really yummy with no case hardening. Now they have to be eaten, and that could take some time. They are vacsealed and have been shared with enthusiastic family and friends. I'll post a photo when I get time
Not doing any curing till this lot is nearly finished. I did make 3 types of sausages today to prepare for the summer barbecuing, but things are busy with the spring prep and planting.
Also building a big shed and garage, so other things have to go on the backburner.
Best regards Ursula.
(That kielbasa looks divine..... May have to find some time........)
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Post by sambal badjak » Fri Oct 10, 2014 09:42

I like the way those look!

Definitely need to work on my sausage stuffing skills as well....
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