Clubhouse Sandwich Stuff

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Clubhouse Sandwich Stuff

Post by sawhorseray » Thu Mar 14, 2013 14:29

I've had a 4 and a 6 pound boneless porkbutt brining after being injected last Saturday morning with CW's Canadian bacon formula.

10 lbs. pork loins
3 tblspns. Cure #1
4 qts. icewater
¾ cup powdered dextrose
1 cup salt

Tuesday I injected a 12.3 pound turkey with CW's now famous 7-UP sauce, then let it soak in the bining bucket till this morning at 4am

2 gallons water
1 gallon 7-Up™ (soft drink)
2-1/4 cups powdered dextrose
1-1/2 cups salt
1 cup Prague Powder #1

I pulled everything out of the coolers and got the Pro 100 to 105° for a 90 minute drying session. As the turkey and the porkbutts call for different temps and smoking times I'm going to attempt to reach some kind of happy medium while smoking them both simultaneously. There aren't the usual pics right now because because I've been sick as a dog and my wife is asleep in the office bed, where the camera happens to be. There should be some pics posted of the finished product if all works out. The porkbutts needed to be tied as they were somewhat splayed upen for removing the bone. My previous attempts at roast tieing worked OK, but the finished job always looked a bit unseasoned. I found this video on youtube that was very easy to follow, managed to pull off a beautiful tie job.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFIwbUBiRSE

Time to raise the smoker temp to 120° and get some applewood smoking. RAY
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Post by Bubba » Fri Mar 15, 2013 01:50

I taught myself to tie a ham from online videos as well. Eventually with practice I got the hang of it close to perfection.

Got mine from our own Ross (aka ssorllih), he has posted some videos on this as well. Another of his that I followed was how to cut up a whole chicken.
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Post by ssorllih » Fri Mar 15, 2013 02:17

That video is a nice demonstration but tying a picnic shoulder that has been boned and skinned is quite a bit more difficult. I learned from a commercial butcher in a neighborhood A&P store. He learned as an apprentice in Germany during the early 1930's. He taught me to bone a beef neck, wrap it with sliced kidney fat and tie it for pot roast.
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Post by sawhorseray » Sat Mar 16, 2013 00:22

Finally got the hams off the smoker at 12:45am. The first one I tied fit into some netting, the second held up just fine.

Image

It took another three hours before the brid was ready to come out at 162°, turned out to be worth the wait.

Image

After a few hours sleep I got up and got back to work, sliced the one ham and the turkey breast paper thin. Great taste, very happy!

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Now I've got a big double batch of split pea soup using my last wild hog ham leftovers and some scraps left from the slicer. Sitting here on the computer enjoying a nice fresh smoked ham and turkey sanny with sharp cheddar on homemade honey-nut bread.

Image

Time to stir that pot, slit pea require extreme vigilance! RAY
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Post by Butterbean » Sat Mar 16, 2013 01:17

Beautiful work! I'm drooling.
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Post by ssorllih » Sat Mar 16, 2013 01:23

All of that looks like it was worth the effort and the wait. Very nicely done. Split pea soup will scorch in a heartbeat. Gas stoves are the worst but a flame spreader helps.
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Post by sawhorseray » Sat Mar 16, 2013 12:47

Thanks for that Ross, I'd never heard of a flame spreader but I need and an now going to get one. Every time I do a double batch I end up using a large pot with a thin bottom and a loose handle, recipe for split pea disaster. Last year a batch had to be tossed because my wife received a bussiness call and forgot about her stirring responsibilities while I was at the store. She's no longer burdened, or trusted, with that particular chore. RAY

PS: The soup came our perfect, there's a hunk of ham in every bite.
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Post by ssorllih » Sat Mar 16, 2013 15:27

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Post by sawhorseray » Sat Mar 16, 2013 15:43

ssorllih wrote:ray this is the thing! http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=htt ... A&dur=5957
Thanks Ross, I'm all over it!
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Post by ssorllih » Sat Mar 16, 2013 16:58

The problem with a gas burner is that the flame temperature is the same regardless of the flame size.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sat Mar 16, 2013 19:48

Ray, that's incredible! :!: Nicely done pal! Do you make your own bread as well?

Best Wishes,
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Post by sawhorseray » Sun Mar 17, 2013 01:04

Chuckwagon wrote:Ray, that's incredible! :!: Nicely done pal! Do you make your own bread as well?

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Indeed I do CW! I'm no where close to being in Ross league, but I've had a bread-making machine for years that has consistently delivered perfect loaves of white, wheat, rye, honey-nut, and sourdough bread to our table. And just as with smoked meats and fresh sausage, the quality of what I can produce at home is far greater than what I can purchase in a store, and for a whole lot less dough. HA! Get it? Dough............Bread? Some days I just can't stand myself, and then there's the days my wife can't stand me. :lol: RAY

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Post by ssorllih » Sun Mar 17, 2013 01:38

It is very difficult to make bread at home that is a bad as store bought bread. Flour salt yeast and 65% water all mixed together will make very useable bread if you give it just a little bit of attention. You don't even need to knead it as much as you do a sausage mixture. Just don't add too much extra flour.
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Post by sawhorseray » Sun Mar 17, 2013 13:04

ssorllih wrote:It is very difficult to make bread at home that is a bad as store bought bread. Flour salt yeast and 65% water all mixed together will make very useable bread if you give it just a little bit of attention. You don't even need to knead it as much as you do a sausage mixture. Just don't add too much extra flour.
Hi Ross! Question: have you ever made your own pizza dough? I keep thinking of making a pizza now and then and what holds me back is the dough. My wife isn't happy with Boboli or Frishetta, says if I'm going to make a pizza I should be making the dough from scratch. I can't see all that tossing the dough in the air over my head and twirlling it around either, same result might be accomplished with a rolling pin. There's always sausage and Canadian bacon in my freezer and Classico tomato sauce in the pantry. Add some onion, bell pepper, black olive, salami, and mozzerella cheese and you've got a pizza that Round Table would deliver to your door for about $30. Now I've inspired myself, time to check the net for pizza dough recipes! RAY
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Post by sawhorseray » Sun Mar 17, 2013 14:00

Please disregard previous post. After watching a half dozen youtube videos on making pizza dough I'm of the opinion I'm not going to take that much time and effort for something that doesn't mean that much to me. I also don't need pizza paddles, pizza stones, or pizza anything else for something that I'd maybe make twice a year, at most. Boboli will do if I ever decide to make a pizza, my wife can eat a smoked turkey leg if she doesn't want to try the pizza. For a woman who was a vegetarian for about 25 years my wife has become quite the smoked meat fanatic. RAY
“Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment.”
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