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Loco
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Fat Back

Post by Loco » Wed Dec 26, 2018 16:02

I was able to find a butcher in near by town that will sell me hard fat, but I need to buy in 5# increments. My question is how do I store it? can I simply Vac Pac and Refrigerate/freeze? How long can I store it, will it turn rancid on me?

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Loco
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Wed Dec 26, 2018 16:25

Just vac pack and freeze. USDA says you can store frozen for 3 months before it starts to deteriorate. I have found it starts to get pasty (loses texture) after a year or so
mwhitnell
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Vac pak frezzing foods

Post by mwhitnell » Thu Jan 03, 2019 15:48

Bob,
Believe what you wish and go ahead and listen to opinions all you wish...I can tell you that vac pak foods frozen at 0F can be stored for years not months and still be fresh as the day it was packed...I went fishing in Alaska 10 years ago and had salmon fillets vac pak and forzen, it is still good and fresh this day. I have salamis sliced and vac packed in the freezer that have been there 5 years and I remove, thaw and eat it and it is as good as the day I packed it. So regard this as fact not opinion.
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Fri Jan 04, 2019 05:01

Boy that must be some magic salmon! Like any fish salmon is best when fresh. And eating the catch of the day is heaven. My salmon does not fare that well, to me there alraedy is a noticeable difference between a pice of the same salmon that has has been vaccum sealed and frozen for three months and the piece that was frozen for only one month. After a year, the salmon holds less water, there is a change in texture and the taste of fish is stronger. I wonder what a 10 year old salmon would taste like?
jrittvo
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Post by jrittvo » Fri Jan 04, 2019 05:14

I have read that a lot has to do with how quickly the item is frozen. Faster freezing makes smaller ice crystals which in turn allow for longer storage and less change in texture. They were talking about the difference between a generic home refrigerator/ freezer and a commercial flash freezer.
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Sat Jan 05, 2019 07:57

jrittvo wrote:I have read that a lot has to do with how quickly the item is frozen. Faster freezing makes smaller ice crystals which in turn allow for longer storage and less change in texture. They were talking about the difference between a generic home refrigerator/ freezer and a commercial flash freezer.
Yes, Flash freezing is the way to go. We have an upright freezer at home that is the frost free type with a fan which blows in the cold air. Food items ate frozen very quickly if spread out on the shelves. If I place anything in our chest freezer it takes 24 hours to freeze completely. So always use the upright first, and once frozen transfer the food to the chest. The temperature in the freezer is also important. Colder temps will preserve food longer. Our home freezers go down to -18-20, while industrial can run as low as -40.
bobrap
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Post by bobrap » Sat Jan 05, 2019 17:01

What temp do you set yours at? The most common house setting is 0F, right? Just curious :smile: .
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