Recipe wanted..Kransky

Tasie Tiger
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Post by Tasie Tiger » Sat Nov 12, 2016 05:30

Bob K, hi bob
hoping you might be able to set me on the right path iv got a kitchen aid mixer with mincer attachment and sausage stuffer. I was thinking about trying to make some kransky sausages . i was after a recipe if you could help me out and id appreciate any tips you might have for a beginner.
cheers thanks mate
Rick
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Sat Nov 12, 2016 15:38

Hi Rick and welcome to the forum!
As far as recipes I posted a link in the beginning of this thread, If you read this thread from the beginning Tony (Blue Monkey} is also making this sausage for the first time so it's a great way to get started. Read through the For Beginners section of this site, lots of tips and tricks.

A Great way to start to learn the basics and also for recipes and general reference is the book Home Production of Quality Meats and Sausages by The Marianskis

And don't be afraid to ask questions, plenty of folks here willing to help.
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Sat Nov 12, 2016 22:56

Hi Rick, glad you could join us. Making a Kransky sausage (Kranjska klobasa) is a an excellent choice to start your hobby. It is relatively simple to make and is spiced only with pepper and garlic. However, there exist different variations, some with with pork only, others with beef and there is also a version with cheese. Originally a Slovenian sausage, but the Croats and Austrians also claim it as their own. And it's not far removed from a Polish kielbasa. I tasted the Austrian version, known as Krainerwurst this past September while on a cycling holiday in Austria and in taste it was very close to the sausage my father makes. Mild tasting, lightly smoked and versatile in how you can serve it. I have a recipe in my files on my desktop, but a the moment I am travelling and only have an iPad (overrated and over priced). If you can wait until the end of next week, I'll post the recipe then.
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Post by BlueMonkey » Tue Nov 15, 2016 12:42

Hi Rick,

I put all my recipes into an exel spreadsheet so all I have to do is pump in the meat weight and the rest automatically calculates.
If anyone wants a copy of the spreadsheet please pm me.

The Kransky recipe I used was Krainerwurst, and as i stated before was found on another Site, however I believe it is also in here somewhere too.

I was after a traditional type sausage, and not one with cheese / milk powder and such like.

Please see my recipe below for your records. ( Plagarised)

Krainerwurst

Ingredient % of Meat Weight (gr) Used ( I fill in this column with any variations i make)
1000gm meat
Pork Butt with fat 70% 700g
Beef ( lean chuck) 15% 150g
Fresh Belly / Bacon 15% 150g
Salt 1.80% 18g
Cure #1 0.25% 2.5g
Coarse Black Pepper 0.30% 3g
Garlic ( crushed and minced) 0.35% 3.5g
Granulated Garlic 0.30% 3g
Bactoferm LHP if making semi-dry 0.10% 1g

Genuine Slovenian Krainerwurst has pretty specific traditional instructions. It must contain a minimum of 68% pork, 12% beef, and 20% fresh pork belly (bacon) with a little added water and only salt, garlic, and black pepper added for seasoning. The meat must be cut into 10 to 13 mm. pieces, and the bacon into 8 to 10 mm. pieces. Only 32-36 mm. hog casings are used, and links are formed in pairs of 12 to 16 cm lengths having the weight of 180 to 220 grams. Wooden skewers are used to hold the pairs together. The sausages are cured and then hot-smoked at relatively low temperatures. It`s interesting to note that the recipe has been widely misrepresented over time, especially in America where various spices and cheeses have been added.
Garlic added to sausage is pungent and it may be a little bitter. Par-cooked or `barely browned`, it becomes sweetened with roasted garlic flavor. The addition of oil and salt are the best kept secret ingredients in protecting garlic`s flavor. It`s because oil protects and stabilizes allicin, the compound in garlic that`s responsible for its characteristic flavor. Allicin is produced when garlic is cut or crushed, and it quickly degrades into less flavorful compounds when exposed to air. When oil is added to comminuted meat, it coats the meat particles. However, once in oil, the allicin dissolves and is protected from the air. With this defense, it freely moves into meat particles delivering full flavor. Salt has its own trick also as it speeds up the process when it draws water containing allicin out of the garlic much quicker than it would on its own. So, what is the secret of using garlic in sausage? Don`t add all raw garlic to your recipe... cook most of it by poaching it just a few minutes in a little oil and salted water. When the liquid is reduced and cooled, put it into a food processor and pulverize the cooked garlic. Add the liquefied garlic mixture to the primary bind and blend it thoroughly with the meat.


To make "fresh" sausage:
Place the grinder knife and plate into the freezer while you separate the fat from the lean meat using a sharp knife. Cut the meat into 1-1/2 " cubes to keep sinew from wrapping around the auger behind the plate as the meat is ground. Grind the meat using the 3/8" plate and the pork fat using a 3/16" plate. Mix the Cure #1 with a little water for uniform distribution and add it to the meat. Work with small batches, refrigerating the meat and fat at every opportunity. Next, mix the meat into a sticky meat paste by adding the remaining ingredients and kneading the mixture to develop the primary bind. Stuff the sausage into 32-36 mm. hog casings, allowing them to hang and dry at room temperature for an hour. "Fresh" sausage must be refrigerated and consumed within three days, or frozen for future use.

To make "cured-cooked-smoked" sausage:
Grind the meat using the 3/8" plate and the pork fat using a 3/16" plate. Remember to add Cure #1. For ten pounds of meat, use 2 level teaspoons of cure mixed with a little water for uniform distribution and add it to the meat. Mix the cure and ingredients thoroughly throughout the primary bind. Work with small batches, kneading the meat into a sticky meat paste, refrigerating the meat and fat at every opportunity. Stuff the sausage into 32-36 mm. hog casings, allowing them to hang and dry at room temperature for an hour. Place the sausages into a preheated 130°F. (54°C.) smokehouse for an hour (with the damper open) before introducing hickory smoke and adjusting the damper to only 1/4 open. Gradually, only a couple of degrees every twenty minutes, raise the smokehouse temperature until the internal meat temperature (IMT) registers 150°F. This procedure must be done slowly to avoid breaking the fat. Remove the sausages, showering them with cold water until the IMT drops to less than 90°F. (32°C.). This sausage remains perishable and must be refrigerated until it is grilled on a smoky BBQ grill.

To make "semi-dry cured" sausage:
Grind the meat using the 3/8" plate and the pork fat using a 3/16" plate. Remember to add Cure #1, a tablespoon of sugar, and one gram of LHP culture to the recipe. For ten pounds of meat, use 2 level teaspoons of cure mixed with a little water for uniform distribution and add it to the meat. Next, prepare the culture by following the mixing directions on the packet. Use non-chlorinated water and mix the cure and ingredients thoroughly throughout the primary bind. Work with small batches, kneading the meat into a sticky meat paste, refrigerating the meat and fat at every opportunity. Stuff the sausage into 32-36 mm. hog casings.

If you have a "curing chamber", place the sausages in it and ferment at 100°F for 24 hours in 90% humidity. If a drier sausage is desired, ferment it for 48 hours.

If you do not have a "curing chamber", place one pound of regular table salt onto a cookie sheet with a lip around it. Spread the salt out evenly and add just enough water to barely cover the salt. Place the cookie sheet and salt in the bottom of an old fridge (unplugged) or your home kitchen oven. Keep the oven warm by using the pilot light in a gas model, or a hundred-watt light bulb covered with a large coffee can with several holes drilled in it. This will produce a warm area for a 2-day fermentation period at about 70% humidity.

When the fermentation has finished, place the links into your pre-heated 120°F smoker and introduce warm smoke. Use a hygrometer and try to maintain a 70% humidity during the process. Gradually, raise the temperature of the smokehouse by merely 2 degrees every 20 minutes. Do NOT attempt to boost the heat to shorten the duration. This procedure may take several hours. Monitor the IMT (internal meat temperature) and when it reaches 140°F, discontinue the cooking-smoking.

Have fun.
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