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Backslopping frozen mould culture

Posted: Thu Jun 19, 2014 06:47
by redzed
Image

The sausages on the left is my latest batch of Salame di Cervo, 16 days after fermentation. I am getting low on on Bactoferm 600 Mould, so instead I inoculated them with mould from skins of previous salami that I had frozen in a plastic bag in my freezer. The skins had been frozen for at least 3 months. I took a few, immersed them in distilled water, added a pimch of dextrose and sprayed the salami after the initial fermentation period. The Penicillium nalgiovense came to life very quickly and coated the sausages thoroughly. No wild moulds are visible and the grey spots on the photo is yeast. Shows that this is one culture that survives temps of -20°C.

Posted: Thu Jun 19, 2014 07:50
by ursula
Red, that's fantastic!
You are a real experimenter. You must have a bit of scientist in you.
How much green weight would have been in one of those really big salamis?
Ursula

Posted: Thu Jun 19, 2014 08:00
by redzed
Hey Ursula! Those are actually small salamis, they weighed approx. one pound when stuffed.

Posted: Thu Jun 19, 2014 10:21
by Chuckwagon
Hey Red,
Did you know that backslopping dates back to the time of the Romans? No kidding. It was a very popular procedure. Gosh, I was just a child at the time, but I remember racing my chariot up and down the cobblestone streets and being pulled over by the Centurions for speeding. :roll:

Posted: Thu Jun 19, 2014 16:35
by redzed
Chuckwagon wrote: I remember racing my chariot up and down the cobblestone streets and being pulled over by the Centurions for speeding
Hmm, I think you may be confusing that with the time you tried to take the buckboard into the fast lane on the I15! :grin: