Home made paprika

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Butterbean
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Post by Butterbean » Wed Aug 15, 2012 18:11

Hurts don't it?!?

I have some of the peppers drying and they look like they are going to dry well. I stuck them in the oven last night then I remembered someone gave us a food dehydrator some years back so I now have them in that and they are drying nicely. Most are at the leathery stage but some are like potatoe chips.
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Post by ssorllih » Wed Aug 15, 2012 21:05

Get you 16 year old nephew to halp you with the peppers before he goes on a date. :lol: :roll:
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Post by Butterbean » Wed Aug 15, 2012 23:37

:mrgreen:

I left the peppers in the dehydrator all day and most are crisp so I pulled the crispy ones out.

The left is tabasco and right is chili.
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Ground all them up and though its not paprika either would definitely add spark to a recipe. The aroma is very strong and the heat - I can't say any store bought pepper I've found can touch it.

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Oh. BTW. I don't think I'm capable of learning cause again I didn't use gloves. This time though my left eye is on fire.
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Post by ssorllih » Thu Aug 16, 2012 00:33

I believe that wiki lists 15 or twenty Hungarian paprikas.
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Post by Butterbean » Thu Aug 16, 2012 01:05

Just out of coincidence I read a blurb stating that pimento was one of the favored ones.

Ssorlih, have you ever had tabasco powder?
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Post by ssorllih » Thu Aug 16, 2012 02:43

No . I like Tabasco sauce, especially on eggs and sos in a military mess hall. Pemento is among the most mild of the peppers.
You got a wonderfully uniform grind on the peppers. As you could see from my picture my grind is all the way from fine powder to rather large flakes.
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Post by Butterbean » Thu Aug 16, 2012 04:52

I'll stick a pack in the package with the other. Both are potent but the tabasco is really out there. I have some habeneras drying too along with some red jalepenos. Hope to get these ground tomorrow.
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Post by ssorllih » Thu Aug 16, 2012 05:32

That will be great. I like to add a serano pepper to a pot of split pea and ham soup along with celery,onion and carrot.
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Post by two_MN_kids » Thu Aug 16, 2012 15:38

Thanks for the idea, and the process. This is something I want to try.

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Post by Butterbean » Thu Aug 16, 2012 16:23

I think I just learned something. I checked on the habenara and the jalepena peppers this morning and found the habeneras were dry so I got things together to grind them. I had some previously dried chili peppers on the counter so I thought I'd grind them too but they had gone from crispy potatoe chip texture back to leathery just from the humidity in the air. So I suspect you don't need to delay grinding the peppers once they are dry.

As for the habeneras, I've found use for my hazmat suit even though Chuckwagon claims its unneccessary in Plan B! Sure wish I had dawned it this morning before grinding these peppers. I should have had a clue when I walked into the kitchen and smelled a strong pungent odor but .... I'm slow and not everyone is meant to ride the long bus .... I ground them and my eyes immediately began to water my nose began to run and my lips began to burn and I went into a fittful sneezing spell. So of course I had to sample this mustard gas colored powder so I stuck my finger in this vulupturous powder and my head was immediately set on fire. My salivary glands began to pour in their feeble attempt to extinguish the fire, my taste buds went into sensory overload from the tip of my tongue to the roof of my mouth and the unerside of my tongue. After a few minutes the heat subsided from areas of my mouth except the tip of my tongue and the experience left me flicking the tip of my tongue against my teeth like a dog whose eaten a stink bug. After about 8 minutes it had subsided. Marvelous! So I did it again! Hold the short bus please!! :mrgreen:
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Post by ssorllih » Thu Aug 16, 2012 16:49

It has been said that the Habanero peppers render you temporarially deaf , so that you can't hear your own screams.
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Post by Butterbean » Thu Aug 16, 2012 16:56

The yield on them wasn't much but I'm sticking some in the package for you to "experiment with". The short bus can be a lonely place. :lol:
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Post by Butterbean » Fri Aug 17, 2012 00:25

Braved the heat and picked some more peppers from the garden. The ones on the bottom left are St. Martin peppers which are a mild thin skinned pepper that I think will make good sweet paprika. Just to the right are little baby red bell peppers. They have a little heat but not much. I think they will make more of a spanish paprika. To the right of these are chilis. On the back row are jalepenos. I just ground some of this from yesterday and I made the mistake of sticking my nose to the container for a smell. It was brutal.

Not sure how using these fresh pepper powders are going to affect my sausages in the future but I know they are not going to taste the same since I don't have any spices on the shelf that have such strength. Its going to be interesting.

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Post by ssorllih » Fri Aug 17, 2012 00:37

Just because the recipe calls for a big spoonful of store bought don't mean you gotta use that much good stuff.
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Post by Butterbean » Fri Aug 17, 2012 00:48

I agree. But I was wondering if maybe we are missing some of the taste in some of the older recipes by using not so fresh spices. I think it will be interesting to follow one of the old ones and use as many fresh spices as possible and see what it tastes like.
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