Rytek Criticized

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Baconologist
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Post by Baconologist » Wed Feb 06, 2013 19:34

ssorllih wrote:I always proof read recipes before I trust them.
That's definitely a good idea, unfortunately, many don't.
Godspeed!

Bob
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Post by ssorllih » Wed Feb 06, 2013 19:43

If the qualtity for the 100 pound recipe is correct the the 10 pound recipe should have called for .4 ounces of cure.
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Post by Devo » Thu Feb 07, 2013 00:07

I think you can find faults in everyones books on susage making.

A box cured method was a well known procedure for curing many slabs of bacon at the same time. A watertight box which can be thought of as a bacon press, was constructed from hardwood and lined up with galvanized steel. The weighted lid applied pressure to the bacon.

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The slabs are placed skin down, except the last one which is placed skin up. During overhaul, the order is reversed. The top pieces are placed on the bottom and the bottom ones on top. The width and the length of the box would approximate the size of the bacon slab. The box would be high enough to accommodate 5-6 slabs, usually 24" high. If it were higher it did not matter much as the weighted lid was placed on top. Rub bacon with 1/2 of the mix and place skin down in the container. After 7 days apply the second half of the mixture and overhaul the slabs. Leave the liquid in. If there are any significant gaps between slabs of bacon and the walls of the container, they can be filled with smaller cuts of trimmed meats. A natural brine will be created and the liquid will rise up to the surface. After curing is completed, soak bacon for one hour, brush the surface clean and hang until dry. Then smoke it, preferably with cold smoke.

Not so sure I'd want anything galvanized in the construction and salt, especially where it comes in contact with the meat.

And yes this was taken from
Marianski, Adam; Marianski, Stanley (2013-02-01). Home Production of Quality Meats and Sausages

I never read in there or at least seen it that galvanized metal is not a good idea
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Post by ssorllih » Thu Feb 07, 2013 00:31

The concern involves zinc and sodium chloride.
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Post by Piker » Fri Feb 08, 2013 04:53

This thread sounds like a hunting forum that I belong to. To much bickering. Everyone is entitled to an opinion and they have every right to exspress it. I learned how to make sausages from Ryteck book with slight variations. I always followed the basic rules but after awhile started adding spices that I liked. I exsperiment a lot and have a lot of friends who love sausage so I never make the same kind twice as I do not use or keep recipes. Over the last 20 yrs I have probably made 2 tons of it nobdy ever got sick from it . So I say go outside the box and live a little. Piker
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Post by JerBear » Fri Feb 08, 2013 07:23

These days I don't really use the author's recommendation regarding cure 1 or salt. I use the legal ppm rate for cure 1 and my personal preference for salt (approx 1.75%) and then use their spice recommendations.
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Post by sausagemaneric » Sun Feb 10, 2013 17:20

Wow, this got pretty hairy pretty quick! Kind of like discussing politics and religion. I am on board with Sawhorseray. Rytek's book is just like my King James Bible, full of notes in the line, worn thin and shabby. I have no comment on Fermento and dried buttermilk powder as my son is deathly allergic to any and all dairy products in the smallest amounts. I do however use Soy Protein and some of the other products he suggested like corn syryp ( OK how the heck do ya spell that!) solids, powdered dextrose etc. We all know they didn't have that stuff in the old days and I am pretty darned OK with that. They didn't have fuel injection in the old days and I don't rebuild as many carbs as I used to either. As for politics and religion, I am right and most people are wrong, let's remember to love what we do and have fun making meat products most people can't and leave it at that.
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Post by crustyo44 » Sun Feb 10, 2013 21:06

Sausagemaneric,
You are so correct. It's very easy to attach Rytek when he is no longer with us. I have his first book as well and have used it extensively as a guide but with my additions and alterations.
One person especially on this forum seems to always knock anybody and everything, the only contributions he ever is criticism.
Quite a few members I exchange emails with, hope that he goes somewhere else sprouting his knowledge. Most of us wish that he keeps his trap shut.
The forum members here are a great bunch of people, I have a learned a lot since I joined and I have been making sausages and smoking all of it for the last 45 years.
Constructive criticism is very welcome on this forum but if you are always hell bent of
knocking people, Please just piss off and hassle others, start with yourself.
No doubt you will probably criticise my use of the English language here, to save you the trouble citicising it, I can write the same in 4 other languages. English is not my first language.
Regards,
Jan.
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Post by ssorllih » Sun Feb 10, 2013 23:08

I only just recently purchased Rytek Kutas book. I have also received his company's complete catalog. In the catalog he has printed several of his recipes with catalog page referrences to the equipment or ingredient source. I commented at the time that I read this that he was not only a good instructor but also a very good merchant.
The more knowledgeable we become the more able we are to produce a good product.
A university education can cost as much as a small house but the knowledge and experience of the life's work that a man writes down in a book can be had for less than the cost of an interior door. If there are small errors in such a book or if there are methods with which you disagree don't condemn the work or the man just disagree with that small piece.
Ross- tightwad home cook
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Post by nuynai » Sun Feb 10, 2013 23:57

Living in Buffalo, NY, I've seen the growth of Rytek's business from a garage to his present store and another outlet in Central NY. When his first book was published, it became the go to book for some of the finest Culinary schools in the world and endorsed by internationally known chefs, re sausage making. Henry ford's Model T can't compare to today's vehicle. Over the years, science has developed a vast more amount of knowledge has come out of it, adding to our betterment. I'll give him tremendous amount of credit for being a pioneer in the sausage making industry and even in today's world, it's still a great resource source, IMHO.
It's sites like this with the exchange of recipes, formulas, etc from around the world that keep us moving forward and enjoying our hobby.
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Post by el Ducko » Tue Feb 12, 2013 00:28

ssorllih wrote:A university education can cost as much as a small house but the knowledge and experience of the life's work that a man writes down in a book can be had for less than the cost of an interior door.
Occasionally, if you look in the right place in just the right way, you'll spot a nugget of insight whose glimmer shines through all the muck and mud and catches the eye.
The quote above is a great example.
Thanks, Ross.
Experience - the ability to instantly recognize a mistake when you make it again.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Mon Jul 22, 2013 07:48

Uhhhh..... folks......
Our buddy and long-time member Story28 has been operating his very successful "3 Little Pigs" in Washington DC for some time now. I believe we could all take a lesson from his techniques at this stage. I recently sampled about everything he was producing and I am happy to say it was all "unique", and it was all "delicious" in every sense of the word. Jason Story is some kind of "sausage wizzard" and he indeed has mastered the secrets. My Stetson (Resistol :lol:) hat is off to Jason Story and his lovely wife Carolina. The have made just about every "secret" sausage and meat product there is. Wow, how I would like to be a fly on the wall down in his basement where the "real stuff goes on"! Congrats Jason, you are a Charcuteriemeister! Keep it up pal.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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