Online Workshop: Project B (August 2012)

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Post by jbk101 » Sat Sep 08, 2012 08:16

Chuckwagon
I am excited will be cutting that Pork Shoulder up sometime today probably in the evening! I like the Idea of bolting it down on the counter top but I would be the one lynched. Then she also gets that new kitchen counter top she's been wanting $$$$$$$$$ ouch. And she would not stop there :grin: :lol: :o
Pics to follow
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sat Sep 08, 2012 09:19

All kidding aside John, a lot of folks fasten their stuffers to neoprene cutting-boards. Countersink the screw heads on the bottom so it doesn't scratch your wife's counter top. Then all you have to do is use two strong spring clamps to hold the thing down.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by redzed » Sat Sep 08, 2012 16:33

CW wrote:
Red, there is no water-bath in this type of sausage (read previous material). Collagen turn gummy when wet. It`s just like me... (won`t work). :roll: After smoking-cooking, just allow them to return to room temperature on their own. Dry them two days on your kitchen counter until bloomed and they`re ready to eat.
Red, trust me... if you`re going fishin`, make 10 pounds of kabanosy in collagen casings. You may also bake them in your kitchen oven if you prefer not to smoke them, but be careful... your kitchen oven will cook them in 20 minutes or less! Set your oven at a lower temperature, say at about 250°F and don`t let the IMT get over 150°F. Let them dry 2 days in the air in your kitchen elevated on oven racks, turning the kabanosy over after 12 hours. To hurry them along, you can dry them with a fan.
Tip: When making kabanosy, don't use added water if you can help it. You may need a little to mix in the cure, but try to keep it dry as possible. It makes a nicer product.
Thanks CW. I wondered about the water, even though it's in Marianski's recipe. Rather than drying at room temp, will 4 days at 60F and 75 RH make a difference?
Last edited by redzed on Sun Sep 09, 2012 06:39, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Gulyás » Sat Sep 08, 2012 18:18

Sometimes I use a dehydrator to dry things. Of course it's smaller then oven.
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Post by Gulyás » Sat Sep 08, 2012 19:10

Hello.

This is NOT Project B photos.

I just made it because I got hungry for it. It's hungarian fresh, I ground the meat with 8 mm. plate.
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Post by grasshopper » Sat Sep 08, 2012 21:48

Question! On kabanosy, can I grind the meat and put in the cure and spices, mix it then put it in the fridge over night to meld the spices. First time ever using a cure. I do fresh sausage that way.?
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Post by ssorllih » Sat Sep 08, 2012 22:17

Yes . you can do it that way with no problems.
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Post by grasshopper » Sat Sep 08, 2012 22:30

A mighty, mighty thank's ssorllih. It will fit in very well with this weekend. Stuff and smoke in the morning. I have 5 cord of pole wood delivered yesterday. That needs to be cut up and split.
You really saved my butt.
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Post by tooth » Sat Sep 08, 2012 22:41

Is the caraway for the kabanosy ground or do you use it whole?

I've got my meat and fat back out of the freezer just now, planning on grinding and stuffing before and after the Bears game at noon tomorrow. I'm going to do the 3 fresh recipes, I don't have enough collagen casings from the last time I made snack stix.

We just picked 20 or so lbs of tomatoes from the garden and tonight am going to make a big batch of tomato juice for bloody marys during the game and my sausage making. Tomorrow is going to be a blast!

GO BEARS!
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Post by tooth » Sat Sep 08, 2012 22:51

One more question: I noticed the 3 fresh sausage recipes don't call for any added fat back. I do have some, do any of those recipes require added fat beyond what's in the pork butt? If not, why are we not adding more fat?

I've made recipes that call for it and others that don't. The Italian recipe I've been using calls for 8 oz of fat for 4.5# of pork.
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Post by ssorllih » Sat Sep 08, 2012 23:24

Pork butts are said to contain about 20 to 25 % fat and that is just about right.
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Post by jbk101 » Sat Sep 08, 2012 23:25

Hey Guys,
In regards to the question pertaining to the caraway seeds in the Kabanosy being whole or ground?

I'm not sure what the correct answer is, but everytime I have purchased it from traditional Polish Sausage makers (in Detroit area) the caraway seeds has always been Whole and Not Ground.
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Post by el Ducko » Sat Sep 08, 2012 23:50

grasshopper wrote:...5 cord of pole wood delivered yesterday. That needs to be cut up and split.
Is pole wood reserved for Polish sausage? (Yuk yuk.) :roll:

I hope it's not lodge pole pine or somethin' like that. Post oak is a bit strong for smoking, but some folks use it. Most of our local posts are cedar (actually juniper). Nasty as smokin' wood, :razz: although years ago they used to make charcoal out of it. In our part of the world, "cedar chopper" was a derisive term used kinda like "goat roper," although these days raising goats for the Halal market is more profitable than beef. ...plus, goats'll eat anything. ...right down to the rocks, if you're not careful. :cry:

Has anyone yet suggested what time of wood to use for the upcoming couple of sausages? May I suggest mesquite for the chorizo? ...although any of your favorite woods would do jes' fine. :mrgreen:
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Post by el Ducko » Sun Sep 09, 2012 00:01

jbk101 wrote:Hey Guys,
In regards to the question pertaining to the caraway seeds in the Kabanosy being whole or ground?

I'm not sure what the correct answer is, but everytime I have purchased it from traditional Polish Sausage makers (in Detroit area) the caraway seeds has always been Whole and Not Ground.
John
Baconologist's recipe at http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.ph ... 65df#12355 calls for half a gram of "cracked caraway" per kilo. Stan Marianski's recipe on the Polish site (as interpreted by Chuckwagon) http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.ph ... t=kabanosy specifies 3 grams of "caraway" (no other specification) for 2 kilos of meat. Stan prefers to season lightly, so I'd guess it is whole caraway.

Any other guesses? I'd suggest that if you like the taste of caraway, you crack it gently in mortar & pestle. Otherwise, not. I probably wouldn't powder it, though. Part of the charm is encountering and biting down on the seeds. :mrgreen:
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Post by el Ducko » Sun Sep 09, 2012 00:11

Gulyás wrote:...It's Hungarian fresh, I ground the meat with 8 mm. plate.
Wow! That looks delicious. What is it? (I gotta make some, too.) :mrgreen:
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