Spicy " Hard" Salami

rgauthier20420
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Post by rgauthier20420 » Thu Oct 09, 2014 04:48

Bob, thanks that note is very helpful.
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Post by Divey » Thu Oct 09, 2014 06:53

Very impressive looking Salamis there.

I have a couple of questions after a post from rgauthier, is F-LC the same as T-SPX :?: I have some T-SPX here at the moment.

And when you brush/spray the Salamis with mold, what mold do you use :?:

I am a Hunter and have a small freezer that is holding quite a lot of this seasons Hunting. :mrgreen:
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Post by Bob K » Thu Oct 09, 2014 12:20

Thank you Divey

F-LC and T-SPX are not the same however the F-LC is versatile and will work at the lower traditional fermenting temps. You can read about them here http://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausage ... e/cultures

I use mold 600 formerly M-EK-4 you can read about it at the same link.
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Post by Divey » Fri Oct 10, 2014 02:46

Thank you Bob.

Sorry about the questions.... is there an alternative for the Sodium Erythorbate :?:

I have a product here that I bought off a local Butcher Supplier which is an 'Emusifier' and it contains sodium tripolyphosphate (does not indicate a percentage), butchers use this on a daily basis in their normal beef sausages which they produce in huge numbers. Would that be okay :?:
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Post by Bob K » Fri Oct 10, 2014 12:35

Divey

I wouldn't use the sodium tripolyphosphate in a fermented sausage as it is used as an emulsifier and to retain moisture....neither of which is good for salami making.

As far as the Sodium Erythorbate you can just eliminate it from the recipe. It is used as a cure accelerator and helps to preserve the pink color, and also it is an antioxidant that helps to preserve flavor in stored foods.

I did not use it in the salamis I posted a pic of.
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Post by Baconologist » Fri Oct 10, 2014 22:03

Looks great, Bob! :cool:
Godspeed!

Bob
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Post by Divey » Sat Oct 11, 2014 00:44

Bob K wrote:Divey

I wouldn't use the sodium tripolyphosphate in a fermented sausage as it is used as an emulsifier and to retain moisture....neither of which is good for salami making.

As far as the Sodium Erythorbate you can just eliminate it from the recipe. It is used as a cure accelerator and helps to preserve the pink color, and also it is an antioxidant that helps to preserve flavor in stored foods.

I did not use it in the salamis I posted a pic of.
Thank you very much for that information. :mrgreen:
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Post by Bob K » Wed Nov 19, 2014 20:33

I will do this recipe again :lol:

While the various peppers were predominant the fennel and juniper berry added to the complexity.
Actually suprised at how quickly it dried. Maybe the venison was a factor.

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Post by Devo » Wed Nov 19, 2014 20:35

That looks wonderful Bob, how do you find the casings peeling off....OK?
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Post by Bob K » Wed Nov 19, 2014 20:58

They actually come off easily. But my drying/curing chamber rarely gets below 85% as I try to add a new batch every month. They (the casings) are beef middles.
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Post by Devo » Wed Nov 19, 2014 21:38

Bob K wrote:They actually come off easily. But my drying/curing chamber rarely gets below 85% as I try to add a new batch every month. They (the casings) are beef middles.
OK, once I used beef middles and they where a you know what to get off. I actually ended up using a potato peeler to skin them. Once I did that they where fine.
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Post by Bob K » Wed Nov 19, 2014 22:01

I would have to guess that it had dried on the outside of the chub, and it could have been for a number of reasons.

They should just peel right off.

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Post by Devo » Wed Nov 19, 2014 22:10

Yes I would have to agree. It only happened once to me but the end result was excellent peeled LOL
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Post by redzed » Thu Nov 20, 2014 06:02

Bob that salami is pretty darned "purrfect". Evenly dried, nice fat and meat distribution and great colour. The sodium erythorbate probably helped with the latter, even though cured venison tends to result in that dark crimson red. Marianski stresses that when comes to making dry cured products, technique is the most inportant aspect and you sure got it right!
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Excellent made with Beef

Post by Bob K » Fri Apr 17, 2015 18:03

I used the same recipe and substituted beef for the venison. Real tasty "hard" salami.
Makes a great sandwich salami made with 3" casings.

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