Hungarian Csabaii

snagman
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Hungarian Csabaii

Post by snagman » Fri Sep 30, 2011 07:17

Hungarian Csabaii
This renewed posting corrects my earlier one, quantity is now for 1 Kg meat. All ingredients are in grams, most scales have a choice of either....
This sausage takes its name from the village which many years ago made it famous. There is, in October each year a festival, celebrating its uniqueness, culminating in the crowning of the "Csabai King", who is the winner of the best sausage made in a space of two hours, with meat supplied by the organisers.
It is a great tasting sausage, both grilled as fresh, or smoked and used in sandwiches or as an ingredient in dishes.

The Recipe;
1 kg Pork - 80/20 meat/fat
14g Salt
25g Garlic - fresh, pressed and covered with water for 2 hrs
16g Sweet Hungarian Paprika
5 g Hot Hungarian Paprika
2.5g Whole Caraway
5g Icing sugar
2g Prague # 1 - if smoking

Freeze the fat. Cube the meat and spread a single layer on the bench. Spread all ingredients on top, covering the whole surface. Mix together until the red colour develops. Cover in a bowl and refrigerate overnight. Grind together all ingredients with coarse plate, mix well and stuff into hog casing, 350mm/14" double links for smoking, 150mm/6" for fresh. Both should be hung in fridge for three days before freezing/smoking.
It is suggested that a patty is fried prior to stuffing to correct/modify for personal preference, bearing in mind that the original taste is a combination mainly of garlic, paprika and caraway. The hot version will require more of the hot paprika, should not be overbearing, but have a "bite".

A shot of Pálinka ( a type of schnapps made from fruit ) will lubricate the hands and the mind, easy two hours of your time, perhaps punctuated by song.......

Image

The ingredients

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Stuffed into hog casing

Image

At the time, was smoking some belly bacon. For those wanting a try at some good old European flavours, with a family connection, I recommend this sausage.

Thanks for looking !
Last edited by snagman on Thu Nov 22, 2018 04:19, edited 4 times in total.
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Post by JerBear » Fri Sep 30, 2011 07:26

Looks awesome. I'm guessing you don't want too pronounced of a garlic flavor. What was your smoking schedule?
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Post by snagman » Fri Sep 30, 2011 07:35

JerBear wrote:Looks awesome. I'm guessing you don't want too pronounced of a garlic flavor. What was your smoking schedule?
Jerbear,

Thanks for the review. Cold smoked first day for three hours using Apple pellets. The next day, cold smoked for six hours using Mesquite pellets. So, in effect, double smoked with fridge rest between.
As for the garlic, the water soaking releases a lot more garlic flavour, and the water added to the mix distribute it better as well, so there is a pronounced taste of it without being "up front".

If you decide to try this, I would be interested to know what you think of it !
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Post by JerBear » Fri Sep 30, 2011 07:37

Ooooh.... garlic and water was added? Interesting twist... I'm going to start building my smoker on Saturday so hopefully I'll be trying my hand at smoking in the very near future. These'll be near the top of my list.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Fri Sep 30, 2011 09:36

Yes! Me too. I'm going to give it a try in the next day or two. It looks marvelous. Thanks for sharing the recipe Snagman.

If I may make a suggestion :wink: ... American strength Cure #1 requires 2.5 grams for a kilo of meat. Polish "Peklosol" requires 26 g. per kilo. I would advise everyone to be sure to use the conversion page if necessary, and if you are not sure... ASK!
Your pink salt "down under" must be stout stuff eh? :mrgreen: I can't remember the name of your cure in Australia. I've got it written down somewhere. I'm gettin' old and have that "CRS" disorder. :lol:
Here's a quick link to Stan's cure calculator and conversion page. http://www.wedlinydomowe.com/sausage-re ... calculator
That takes the guesswork out of the equation and it's super-simple to use.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Last edited by Chuckwagon on Fri Sep 30, 2011 19:01, edited 1 time in total.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by snagman » Fri Sep 30, 2011 10:48

Chuckwagon wrote:Yes! Me too. I'm going to give it a try in the next day or two. It looks marvelous. Thanks for sharing the recipe Snagman.

If I may make a suggestion :wink: ... American strength Cure #1 requires 2.5 grams for a kilo of meat. That pink salt "down under" must be stout stuff eh? :mrgreen: I can't remember the name of your cure in Australia. I've got it written down somewhere. I'm gettin' old and have that "CRS" disorder. :lol:
Here's a quick link to Stan's cure calculator and conversion page. http://www.wedlinydomowe.com/sausage-re ... calculator
That takes the guesswork out of the equation and it's super-simple to use.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Thanks for that Chuckwagon.
I used a product here which is packaged with the 2gm per kilo instruction, maybe its makeup is UK based, which is higher percentage.
That calculator is great though !
Regards
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Post by Bubba » Fri Sep 30, 2011 17:39

This recipe looks so good I'll make a small batch tomorrow, but will keep it fresh.
JerBear wrote:I'm going to start building my smoker on Saturday
I also have to start building my smoker so lower temperatures are achievable, hence the fresh version of this sausage I will be making tomorrow.

The method of adding water to the garlic is interesting yes, and one that I would like to adopt as well.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Fri Sep 30, 2011 19:07

Bubba wrote:
This recipe looks so good I'll make a small batch tomorrow, but will keep it fresh.
It certainly does. How can you go wrong with garlic, caraway, and Hungarian paprika?
On the other hand, the Boerwores recipe looks pretty dang good also! The judges are going to have a tough time deciding on a winner for September!

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Bubba » Fri Sep 30, 2011 22:46

Chuckwagon wrote:The judges are going to have a tough time deciding on a winner for September!
They will, but then that adds to all our variety of delicious food we can learn to make from the contributors, it's the spice of life. :smile:
Ron
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Post by snagman » Sat Oct 01, 2011 05:46

The sugar does two things in my experience - it is a balance for the salt when smoked, and when panfried it caramelises, adding to flavour and results in a nice colour. So, when pan frying, if water is put into the pan first, say 1/4 up the sausages, then simmered until evaporated, the sausages are already mostly cooked. The remaining cooking time is much less, so you are colouring, frying the casings to crispy and the added sugar helps with this. Also when cooking this way, no fat is needed, the sausage supplies its own. Now, if you then sauté pre cooked potatoes in this fat, you are in seventh heaven........ and maybe just a bit that much closer too !
Regards
Last edited by snagman on Wed Sep 19, 2012 23:37, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by JerBear » Sun Oct 02, 2011 19:19

Just to clarify, were you asking why the addition of sugar or why the sugar had to be icing or powdered sugar? At least that's what I was curious of.
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Post by ssorllih » Mon Oct 03, 2011 01:24

Some of the commercial sausage that is offered has so much sugar in it that it is more likely to burn and become bitter if your skillet is a bit too hot. A light touch with the sugar and the salt is not a bad thing.
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Post by JerBear » Mon Oct 03, 2011 22:39

Totally understand that quantity can be an issue but is there any purpose to using powdered/icing sugar vs. table sugar? In this recipe it's by weight so I think that volume of powder vs. crystal would be somewhat mitigated.
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Post by ssorllih » Tue Oct 04, 2011 01:38

Jerbear there is no difference between powdered sugar and table sugar. It is all just the fineness og the grind. Once it has desolved it will be indistingishable.
My best customer runs a sugar packaging plant and produces granulated sugar, brown sugar and confectioners sugar. The differences are 10 to 15 per cent molassas in brown sugar and the fineness of the grind in confectioners sugar.
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Post by crustyo44 » Tue Oct 04, 2011 01:57

Snagman,
I am in the process of making 8.5 kg of this csabai recipe, if it is any better than the earlier version, it needs a gold medal as well.
I personally prefer lots of hungarian paprika, garlic, plenty of heat and a nice darkish
smoked finish to suit my European taste buds. This it!!!!!!!!
Regards,
Jan.
Brisbane.
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