[USA] Teewurst

IdaKraut
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[USA] Teewurst

Post by IdaKraut » Sun Mar 10, 2013 21:29

NOTE: This a a rohwurst (uncooked sausage) and you must be careful to produce a safe product: (wash hands, wear gloves, keep meats super cold, etc.)

Here's my recipe for Teewurst:

5 lb Pork Butt______________________________________2268g
3 lb lean Beef (not ground beef)_______________________1361g
3 lb Bacon________________________________________1361g
3 lb Pork back fat__________________________________1361g

Spices:

2.1% Kosher salt (Do not calculate wt. of bacon which has salt)________108.0g
0.265% Cure #1_____________________________________________16.8g
0.3% Dextrose (for the culture)_________________________________19.1g
0.3% White pepper, ground____________________________________19.1g
0.1% Allspice, ground__________________________________________6.3g
0.08% Paprika, sweet__________________________________________5.1g
0.05% Cardamom, ground_______________________________________3.2g
0.5% Dark rum________________________________________________32g
0.0126% T-SPX starter culture___________________________________0.8g

Use pork that has been frozen to prevent trichinosis: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/trichinae/ ... _sheet.htm

Also, do not use ground beef which may have e.coli contamination.

Grind partially frozen beef, pork, bacon and fat back using 3mm plate. Then add all the spices except for the salt and cure #1. Do include the starter culture which has been mixed into 30 cc of distilled water with a pinch of dextrose added: let this sit for at least 15 minutes. Then add the rum and mix well.

Put back into freezer until almost frozen again. Depending on your food processor, divide the partially frozen mix (my food processor can do 1.5 lb at a time without too much trouble).

Place the divided mix into food processor (in my case 1.4 lb) and process for 1 to 1.5 minutes. Then add the appropriate percentage of salt and cure #1 mixture (in my case it was about 12.5g) while the food processor is running for another 30 to 45 seconds, which should result in a nice emulsified sausage.

Repeat the above until all of the meat has been emulsified.

Stuff into 1.5 to 2" fibrous casings, tying off at 8 to 10" intervals.

Incubate at 68°F with humidity at least 60% for 48 hours.

Place into smoker and smoke at intervals: active smoking for 1 to 2 hours followed by a non-smoke rest period of 1-2 hours. I did mine using 2 hours of smoke followed by 2 hours of no smoke and repeated this twice (total of 4 hours active smoke). Never let the temperature get above 80°F while smoking. Traditionally beechwood is used for smoking with some juniper berries or juniper twigs added. Todd Johnson of http://www.amazenproducts.com/ was kind enough to send me some beechwood sawdust. I added some juniper berries to this and smoked the teewurst. This is the traditional smoke for this product but one could use apple or maple with almost the same results.

After smoking is done, leave in smoker for another 8 hours at 68°F after which it is placed into refrigeration or freezer.

Great on German bread or crackers. Hope you enjoy this as well as I do. Thanks for looking.

Ground using 3mm plate and then mixed with everything except salt and cure 1:

Image

Ready to emulsify partially refrozen mixture:

Image

After processing and adding the salt/cure #1 mixture it looks kinda sad:

Image

After stuffing and smoking (with rest period) it looks like this:

Image

And finally, here's some of the teewurst on crackers:

Image
Last edited by IdaKraut on Sat Jun 15, 2013 21:48, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by CrankyBuzzard » Sun Mar 10, 2013 22:03

That looks like something I would love to try!

Excellent recipe and instructions as well!

Charlie
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Post by crustyo44 » Sun Mar 10, 2013 22:05

Hi Rudy,
Thank you for sharing this great recipe and how you make them. The photo's are certainly very helpful for beginners like me.
I have fond memories of the Teewurst my mother brought home many years ago.
You are fast becoming the Forums German Wurst/Charcuterie expert, Please keep these recipes coming.
Congratulations,
Jan.
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Post by IdaKraut » Sun Mar 10, 2013 22:14

Charlie and Jan,
Thanks for the kind words.
Rudy
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Post by ursula » Sun Mar 10, 2013 23:32

Hi Rudy,When I was flying for Qantas my favourite trip was Frankfurt. We used to stay in the beautiful medieval town of Mainz, and in the old cobbled part of town was this wonderful traditional butcher who made the most amazing teewurst. Your photos look exactly like it and for a moment it sent me back there. I will definitely have a go at your recipe when I get a chance. You have whet my appetite!
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Post by IdaKraut » Mon Mar 11, 2013 16:44

Just to emphasize one point: make sure you don't add the salt too early to prevent protein extraction from the meat. You want this sausage to be creamy and spreadable. Also, don't skimp on the pork fat (except for beef fat - trim beef fat away from the beef you use), it needs to be around 35 to 40% fat content once all the meats are mixed.
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Post by Bubba » Tue Mar 12, 2013 09:56

Thank you for sharing, the detail of the recipe and method is excellent!

My dad was born in Germany and growing up as a kid there was always one or more good German sausage around from the local German butcher that I still buy whenever I can these days.
Would like to try making this one day.
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Post by ursula » Sat May 04, 2013 09:27

Hi Rudy,
I'm ready to have a go at making that mouthwatering teewurst you featured recently. Just wanted to know what you mean when referring to the bacon as an ingredient. Are we talking about chopped up middle rashers or leaner bacon? Here in Oz we tend to buy bacon by the rashers at the deli, or shortcut which is leaner.
Any suggestions? Regards Ursula
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Post by IdaKraut » Sat May 04, 2013 15:24

Ursula,

I get the cheapest sliced bacon I can find, usually Big Buy brand when it goes on sale for under $2 a pound. It's sliced pork belly bacon with a good deal of fat. Here's a picture I found on the net showing what I buy: Big Buy bacon. I guess you would call that rasher.

I use bacon to add some smokiness and fat to the teewurst.
Rudy
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Post by crustyo44 » Sat May 04, 2013 20:28

Hi Ursula,
Coles has smoked rashers on special for $ 5.00 kilo. Just what you need. It's hard to understand why pork belly sells for over $ 10.00 kilo in the same outlet.
Where did you get the T-SPX Starter Culture. Adelaide?
Good Luck with the Teewurst!!!!!
Regards,
Jan.
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Post by ursula » Sun May 05, 2013 00:50

Thank you Jan and Rudy. I get the idea now. Our local grocery has bacon on special tomorrow so I'll give it all a go this week. Nice to try something a bit different. I have almost caught up with eating all the sausages I made last year. Great excuse for a get-together with friends. But I need more room in the freezer now!
Best wishes Ursula
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Post by ursula » Sun May 05, 2013 08:38

And yes, Jan, the T-SPX was from Adelaide.
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Post by ursula » Wed May 08, 2013 09:44

Rudy, thank you for your recipe. The mixture tastes great even before fermentation and smoking, and is reminiscent of the German product I've tried. So it could be sensational.
The lovely little chubs are hanging in my "fermentation chamber" a metal frame covered in black garbage bags. Temp is 64 degrees and humidity fluctuates between 60 and 72%. Does that sound about right? And can you tell me: In Marianski's recipes he gives a temperature (68, I think) and then 75% humidity. Is that a desired level or is it a maximum?
Thanks Rudy
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Post by Chuckwagon » Wed May 08, 2013 12:33

Hi Folks,
You would be surprised at just how many people believe that simple freezing will destroy trichinella spiralis. Actually, the majority of people believe it, and that frightens me. Again, please allow me to play the role of Sausage Safety Sheriff here! :wink: Please note a few safety rules regarding cold-smoked, raw, emulsified and spreadable sausages such as Mettwurst and Teewurst. Folks, this is a raw product containing pork. Please be sure to use only "certified" pork. Simple freezing absolutely does NOT destroy trichinella spiralis. Pork must be cryogenically or "deeply" frozen for a prescribed amount of time in order to be safe.
These sausages are not cooked and must be kept refrigerated until they have lost enough moisture to drop below Aw 0.86. Shucks, refrigerating the meat keeps all bacteria from multiplying right? Wrong! Two foodborne bacteria, listeria monocytogenes and yersinia enterocolitica can actually grow at refrigerator temperatures! Only after losing sufficient moisture will they not require refrigeration as long as the temperature does not exceed 54°F and the sausage is kept in a dark atmosphere of 65% relative humidity.
The Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, at Massachusetts General Hospital has concluded that "Smoking, salting, or drying meat are not reliable methods of killing the organism that causes this infection". Shucks pards, if folks gazed into a microscope and saw the round nematode worm embedded far into human muscle tissue, they would surely think twice about proper sub-zero temperatures. The first time I saw the living microorganism beneath my microscope, I thought I'd puke! The thing that really alarms me is that most people, having only a home freezer, do not have the means of freezing meat at these cryogenic temperatures - so, they take the chance. Yet, if the pork has come from a reliable grocer rather than an "independent small farmer", the chances of you contracting trichinosis is pretty small.
'Wanna get' really scared? Here's how the trichinella spiralis nematode worm works: Trichinella cysts break open in the intestines and grow into adult roundworms whenever a person eats meat from an infected animal. These roundworms produce other worms that move through the stomach wall and into the bloodstream. From here, the organisms tend to invade muscle tissues, including the heart and diaphragm, lungs and brain. At this point, trichinosis becomes most painful.
But if we`ve eaten the stuff, we can get rid of it right? Wrong! The medications Mebendazole or albendazole may be used to treat infections in the intestines, but once the larvae have invaded the muscles, there is no specific treatment for trichinosis and the cysts remain viable for years. Complications of the disease include encephalitis, heart arrhythmias, myocarditis, (inflammation), and complete heart failure. Pneumonia is also a common complication.
So, what are we to do? Purchase pork from a known, reliable, supplier who conforms to USDA and FSIS rules and imports commercially-grown pork. Or, you can cryogenically treat your own if you are a small producer of hogs and insist on feeding your piggies the entrails of other animals. I`m including the FSIS regulations again here, for your reference:

USDA (FSIS) Regulations Regarding The Destruction of Trichinella Spiralis

The Meat Inspection Division of the United States Department Of Agriculture arranges the size, volume, and weight of meat products into"groups" to specify handling instructions. Meat from hogs, having safely passed these specific requirements, is called "certified pork".

Group 1 "comprises meat products not exceeding 6" (inches) in thickness, or arranged on separate racks with the layers not exceeding 6" in depth, or stored in crates or boxes not exceeding 6" in depth, or stored as solidly frozen blocks not exceeding 6" in thickness".

Group 2 "comprises products in pieces, layers, or within containers, the thickness of which exceeds 6" but not 27" and products in containers including tierces, barrels, kegs, and cartons, having a thickness not exceeding 27". The product undergoing such refrigeration or the containers thereof shall be spaced while in the freezer to insure a free circulation of air between the pieces of meat, layers, blocks, boxes, barrels, and tierces, in order that the temperature of the meat throughout will be promptly reduced to not higher than 5 degrees F., -10 degrees F., or -20 degrees F., as the case may be".

Item 1: Heating & Cooking

"All parts of the pork muscle tissue shall be heated to a temperature of not less than 138° F." Whenever cooking a product in water, the entire product must be submerged for the heat to distribute entirely throughout the meat. Always test the largest pieces since it always takes longer to reach the 138°F temperature in thicker pieces. Always test the temperature in a number of places.

Item 2: Refrigerating & Freezing

"At any stage of preparation and after preparatory chilling to a temperature of not above 40° F., or preparatory freezing, all parts of the muscle tissue of pork or product containing such tissue shall be subjected continuously to a temperature not higher than one of these specified in Table 1, the duration of such refrigeration at the specified temperature being dependent on the thickness of the meat or inside dimensions of the container."

Table 1: Required Period Of Freezing At Temperature Indicated

Temperature: Group 1 (first number of days) - Group 2 (second number of days)
+05° F. 20 days / 30 days
-10° F. 10 days / 20 days
-20° F. 6 days / 12 days

Be safe my friends. Please be sure to obey the safety rules. Be sure to use "certified" pork for teewurst and Mettwurst.

My best wishes!
Chuckwagon
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Post by IdaKraut » Wed May 08, 2013 15:39

CW,

Thanks for emphasizing the risk of trichinosis. I think too many people take the risk too lightly even though very few cases have been reported in the US from domestic hog producers. I nevertheless follow a rigorous freezing schedule in a freezer that I monitor the temperature in. I always cube up the pork shoulder meat and place them in 2.5 gallon ziplock bags, flattened as much as possible and freeze for the appropriate time. That's why, in my above recipe, I included the following: "Use pork that has been frozen to prevent trichinosis: http://www.aphis.usda.gov.../fact_sheet.htm"

I realize that despite freezing as outlined above and in various sausage making books, you still run the risk of other bacterial infections, but that's a chance I'm willing to take because I follow strict hygiene standards and use only meats that I believe are the highest quality.

Ursula, don't worry too much about the humidity (as long as it's at least 60%). There's enough fat in the teewurst that it should not lose much moisture.
Rudy
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