[NZE] Irish Sausage?

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redzed
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[NZE] Irish Sausage?

Post by redzed » Mon May 13, 2013 01:59

I am looking to make an Irish sausage for a birthday barbecue. I found this one and am wondering whether it has some legitimacy as an Irish sausage?
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/membe ... S-50092176

If anyone out there has a proven recipe for an Irish sausage, fresh or smoked, I would appreciate having a look at it.

Thanks,

Chris
Last edited by redzed on Sat Jun 15, 2013 22:24, edited 2 times in total.
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el Ducko
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Post by el Ducko » Mon May 13, 2013 02:59

...no cure #1? Yikes!
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Post by redzed » Mon May 13, 2013 03:45

Actually, 5th line from bottom reads "Cure for 12 Pounds Of Pork". So I think I can figure that one out. :grin:
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Post by sawhorseray » Mon May 13, 2013 17:46

Maybe run some boiled potatoes thru the grinder? :mrgreen:
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Post by Big Guy » Mon May 13, 2013 23:13

to me I would add some fat, pork tender loin is too lean to make a good sausage, it will be too dry. I like 20-30% fat in a sausage.
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Post by oneills » Tue May 14, 2013 00:45

Hi Redzed.
Here is one version I have found. The first couple of times we had pigs processed at butchers we had some Irish Pork sausages made and they were beautiful . Now that we do them at home have had to find out what to put in them ourselves. These are for fresh sausage.

Irish Sausage Recipe
● 2 lbs of ground pork (if you can get a butcher to grind it for you fresh, ask for pork ground from the shoulder butt, otherwise, just use regular ground pork)
● 1 egg
● 1 cup of bread crumbs
● ¾ cup of cold water
● 1 and ¼ tsps of salt
● 1 and ½ tsps of dried thyme
● 1 tsp dried marjoram
● 1 tsp freshly cracked black pepper
● ½ tsp or dried rosemary
● 4 cloves of garlic, flattened and finely minced
● Sausage casings (these are generally sold salted and refrigerated. To use, for small batches, just take off a couple of strands, rinse out well with cold water two or three times and then stuff, twisting as you go to form links.
1. Mix together all ingredients (except for the casings!).
2. Take a small amount and fry or microwave it up and then taste for seasoning, and adjust seasoning if necessary
3. Once seasoned to your liking, use a wide mouthed funnel (I often cut a water bottle and use that as a funnel) stuck into the end of a sausage casing, and then press the meat through the funnel into the casing.
4. Divide the casing into links by twisting at intervals, and then refrigerate for a day or two (Ideally) before cooking.

There is also another version on page 278 of Rytek Kutas book Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing, 4th Edition. It is similar but uses herbs in different proportions.
 
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Post by el Ducko » Thu May 16, 2013 13:10

Hey, Chris, I blundered across a recipe for Irish sausage in Rytek Kutas' book, "Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing, 4th edition," on page 278. Got the book? Great! Otherwise, I'll type it in for ya.

We heard a good Irish joke at son-in-law's graduation from law school this past week. Seems that the guest speaker was told he was like the body at an Irish wake: essential for the ceremony, but expected not to be long-winded.
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Post by redzed » Thu May 16, 2013 13:42

Thanks for the heads up on the Kutas recipe. I have the book, but have never noticed it. Maybe because I had no interest in it before. I will be crafting my Irish sausage next week after I return from Montreal. I will definitely be having a viande fumée sandwich before I leave here. In case some of you don't know, Montreal is famous for it's kosher style beef brisket, seasoned, cured, smoked and lastly steamed. Sliced thinly and served on rye, it is one of the best things you can eat.
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Post by redzed » Sun May 26, 2013 18:54

Made 3kg of my first Irish sausage. Used Rytek's recipe, (similiar to the one above posted by oneills) with few modifications) Since I always have to make gluten free products, I substituted the bread crumbs with a product called Response, a textured soy protein concentrate. The sausage turned out better than I expected. Moist, packed with flavour and with a nice texture. The combination of fresh rosemary, thyme, marjoram and a load of garlic made the house smell like heaven. Served it grilled at a birthday party for an Irish friend and she really enjoyed it.
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Post by oneills » Mon May 27, 2013 05:44

Looks great :grin:
What size plate did you grind meat through ? Will be making a heap next month when pigs are butchered. They are a favourite in our house. There are some commercial premixes available here but havent been game to try them yet
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Post by crustyo44 » Mon May 27, 2013 06:56

Hi Oneills,
Forget about the pre-mixes. I tried one and came to the conclusion that I had wasted my money. Ask Redzed about sharing his recipe.
He really is a bit of a sausage expert.
Cheers Mate,
Jan.
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Post by redzed » Mon May 27, 2013 16:08

oneills wrote:Looks great :grin:
What size plate did you grind meat through ? Will be making a heap next month when pigs are butchered. They are a favourite in our house. There are some commercial premixes available here but havent been game to try them yet
Hi oneills.
I ground the meat first with a 12mm plate and then with a 6mm. That way I got a nice mix and texture. Hope you post reports and pics of what you will be making with all that pork.
Chris
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sat Jun 15, 2013 22:21

Hi Chris,
Sausage Sheriff here...
You wrote:
Actually, 5th line from bottom reads "Cure for 12 Pounds Of Pork". So I think I can figure that one out.
Geeeze, I had to get out my magnifying glass!

I`d like to get after Epicurious just a bit. The instructions are vague and the average reader has no idea what the author is even talking about. I would venture to say that most people reading the Epicurious recipe just go ahead and make the sausage, never even bothering to find out about sodium nitrite, much less go about actually using it. In my opinion, although Epicurious may be not technically liable, they should be aware that they constitute reckless endangerment by not qualifying their instructions and making it absolutely clear to the novice that sodium nitrite must be added to the recipe in the proper amount.

Please folks, if you make this (or any other smoked sausage), be sure to add Cure #1, used to cure all meats that require cooking, smoking, and canning. This includes poultry, fish, hams, bacon, luncheon meats, corned beef, pates, and many other products. Add one level teaspoon of cure to each 5 pound batch of meat.

Note that Prague Powder Cure #1 in the United States, contains 6.25% sodium nitrite (NaNO2), and 93.75% sodium chloride (salt). As this formula contains no sodium nitrate (NaNO3), there is no waiting for nitrate to be broken down into nitrite and it is effective immediately in curing meat. In the United States, Cure #1 is manufactured using one ounce of sodium nitrite added to each one pound of salt. When used in the curing process, only 4 ounces of cure is added to 100 pounds of sausage. Two level teaspoons will cure 10 lbs. of meat.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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