Weisswurst with Turkey and Pork

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redzed
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Weisswurst with Turkey and Pork

Post by redzed » Thu Jun 18, 2015 17:42

Finally got to try my new Chinese bowl chopper. Not exactly what I imagined it would be. First of all it's a bit under powered and when you are working with a 5l bowl you soon learn that it's not a high capacity machine. I prepared 5kg of meat and had to process it in three different batches. On top of that it's extremely messy as it throws out chunks of meat and fat at the start and then you have to stop the machine a couple of times during the emulsification process and scrape off the meat that gets stuck to the underside of the cover. I thought I would document everything and take pictures of the different processing steps but my hands were soon covered with meat paste and I had to work fast since it is important to keep the temp down. And this Chinese creation comes only with one speed for the knife rotation (1400rpm) and a single speed of the bowl rotation. Heck of a lot of cleaning after I finished the sausage. Fortunately the bowl and cover are removable, and I have a large sink for washing. But it took me a long time to clean the knives. Ideally, in commercial setting you could clean it with water pressure, something that is not possible for me. Took me half a day to clean the equipment, wash all the lugs and bowls and the floor! In the end I spent two days making 5kg (11bs) of sausage.Image

I made a traditional Bavarian weisswurst, substituting veal with turkey leg meat. The whole process did not go that smoothly. To begin with, I am totally inexperienced with using bowl choppers, making this session a baptism with fire. But in the end, the sausage turned out fantastic as far as the texture and taste goes. It's mildly seasoned yet delicious, juicy with a delicate and fluffy texture. So good you can feed it to a baby! I was a bit surprised at the end result since I intended to process the meat longer and get a more loose and moist mass. But I used up the amount of water and had to stop when the temp reached 14C (57F). Most emulsified sausage recipes call for the addition of 10-15% water and the Germans go as high as 20% and that is the amount I went with. I also chose not to use any phosphates or binders, but next time I will use some soy protein isolate which can bind 5 parts of water. The turkey meat was a good choice since it absorbed the water quite well and the combination with pork produced a pleasant flavour. In all my previous sausage making efforts, the turkey/pork combination always resulted in a great tasting sausage and this time it was no different.

While reading and studying the recipe, I recommend that you listen to a rendition of the Weisswurst Polka https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cvCA7VGrHZI

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Turkey Weisswurst Recipe

Meats
Turkey leg meat (no skin or connective tissue) 600g
Lean pork 100g
Fat pork 50g
Boiled pork skins 100g
Pork back fat 150g

Ingredients per 1000g (1 kg) of meat
Salt 20 g
White pepper 3 g
Mace 3 g
Ginger powder 2g
Parsley, fresh chopped 7g
Lemon zest, grated and dried 3g
Lemon extract 2 drops
Raw white onion, diced 75g
Iced water 200ml (or preferably finely crushed ice 200g)

Instructions
1. Boil skins for approximately 30 minutes or until soft and not chewy.
2. Grind semi frozen meat, fat, skins and onion, keeping the meats and fats separate, through a 3mm plate. Return everything into the freezer until the temp of the meat is below freezing.
3. Chop the turkey meat, adding the salt and 50% of the water/ice, until temp reaches 6C(43F), add the lean and fat pork and 25% of the water and chop, again watching that the temp does not exceed 6C. Finally add the fat and skins, spices and the rest of the water and chop/emulsify until temp reaches 14C(57F)
4. Stuff the emulsified meat into 32-38mm casings and twist off into 12cm links. Allow the sausage to set in the fridge overnight, or a minimum of 3 hours. Poach at a temp of 80C(176F), until IT reaches 74C(165F). Because this is a poultry product, we need to take it to a higher temp. If making weisswurst from veal and pork, and IT of 66C(150F) would be adequate. Sausages can be kept in the fridge for a few days or frozen. To consume, gently reheat in water, but do not boil! Or grill them for a few minutes, just to slightly brown an heat thoroughly.
5. Serve with a fine German mustard and pour yourself a beer! Weisswurst is always eaten with the skin off. If you don't know how to eat weisswurst, here is a quick tutorial. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJLC-kqfKqg
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Post by Cabonaia » Fri Jun 19, 2015 08:24

Hi Red - sounds like a wonderful recipe. I'm thinking of making something similar using pork and chicken, as we've got some roosters in the freezer that are a bit on the tough side.

Regarding emulsifying up to certain temperatures - is taking the temp up to the maximum allowable advantageous, or is it just a way to liquefy the meat as much as possible without smearing?

I have emulsified using a food processor, and stopped long before the paste reached 57F as it seemed smooth enough before that point. But I have wondered if the results are better if you keep going right up to the line. Maybe I'm missing something!

Thanks!
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Post by Bubba » Fri Jun 19, 2015 14:52

Redzed that recipe with the Turkey sounds interesting, I will try this soon. Your finished / heated sausage looks perfectly appetizing!

And you have my envy for your bowl chopper, it is a lot more work but worth it. I use my grinder to get the fine texture, maybe one day Santa will bring me a bowl chopper :lol:
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Post by redzed » Fri Jun 19, 2015 15:23

Hey Jeff your rooster meat should work well in this recipe. Just remember, weisswurst is a very mild flavoured sausage and does not bite back when you sink your teeth into it. But if you serve it with the right condiments it's a fantastic sausage. And adding pork will definitely make it better than using chicken alone. If you have pork skins add these as well, as they contribute collagen and improve flavour and texture.

As to to taking it up to 57F you don't need to do that if you don't have to. It's that by the time it reaches that temp your knives are probably quite warm and at 60 the emulsion can break. All the better if you achieve a smooth consistency at a lower temp. I took mine that high because I had to. Next time I will use crushed ice, make sure my meat is semi frozen at -6C and the fat frozen solid. Commercial producers use meat frozen to -15C, but of course have powerful equipment that can chop and emulsify it efficiently.

Bubba the bowl chopper is fun but all a new twist. Keep your eyes open for a good used Hobart or Berkel. They come up at auctions now and then. Wish I had some hands on help and advice in using mine. This is all a learning experience for me but it's great to widen you field in this great hobby. I'm looking forward to making the next batch of emulsified sausages.
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Post by Cabonaia » Sat Jun 20, 2015 08:00

Thanks Chris - this is something I have been wondering about for a long time. I really like making sandwich meats like mortadella and cotto, not to mention liver sausages, and want to get better at emulsifying though I doubt I'll ever find room or $$ for a bowl chopper. I just bought a new blade for the Cuisinart and that will have to do for now. The closest contact I've had with a bowl chopper is when I was threatened with the knife from one by a crazy cook after I told him to keep his greasy mitts off my girlfriend. That was er, some time back. :shock: I do remember that wonderful machine.
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Post by Bubba » Sat Jun 20, 2015 14:44

I have been watching the Hobart YouTube videos, those choppers are awesome.
It's probably more like wishful thinking from my end, I search Craigslist and auction sites regularly for a bargain. So far nothing, nevertheless I'll keep looking.

That rare Barn or Attic find chopper may come my way some day.
Ron
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Post by BriCan » Sat Jun 20, 2015 17:12

redzed wrote: I took mine that high because I had to.
Why? ... legitimate question
Next time I will use crushed ice,
On the ice front, if possible divide by three when adding -- always found this worked much better
Commercial producers use meat frozen to -15C, but of course have powerful equipment that can chop and emulsify it efficiently.


I never worked with frozen, then again I was only a very small commercial producer -- adding the ice in 1/3rds was what made the difference for us
Wish I had some hands on help and advice in using mine.
I might get over one of these days -- need to see friends
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Post by redzed » Sun Jun 21, 2015 14:44

Brican what I meant by "I had to stop" is my temp reached 14C before I achieved a finer emulsion. I know I could have put it back into the freezer and gave it another go but decided not too, esyecially since I had divided my 5kg batch into three parts. I quickly learned that a 5l bowl cutter will not chop 5kg at once. :lol:

If you come across the ditch one of these days we could make something together. I'm always willing to learn. :lol:
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