Mold confussion!!??

Fingers
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Mold confussion!!??

Post by Fingers » Wed Mar 23, 2016 13:54

So now mold is growing on my goods, both pancetta and salami's. White powdery from where I wiped on from my shop bought salami, this nice powdery mold has since populated a batch of salami I made without a starter culture and is the only mold showing on it, great. As here.
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My next batch of salami made with a starter culture hung next to the others is also starting to show mold, a different type however, white spots with some spots having a light blueygreen centre. The powdery mold has not deemed that batch a nice home?! I have since bought another salami and tried to cultivate the mold by soaking the skin in warm water with a spoon of dextrose for 20 hours. Wiped off the spots of mold with the light blueygreen center and sprayed them down with my "good" mold spray, time will tell.

My Pancetta which has now been hanging for 16 days wraped in a muslin layer and not touched by my shop bought mold is growing mold spots, but the sort with a blueygreen center it looks like. I am unsure as to leave of wipe as wiping the whole thing would remove my coating of seasoning and it smells so good!
I am tempted to remove just the green spots from it and then spray with my mold culture if it works that is, I will find out in a few days I guess if the mold culture is taken.

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To add to the confusion of it all heres what you find searching for mold, good or bad.!

To read here, BAD kind

http://waterinfood.com/2011/04/07/mold-the-bad-kind/

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To read here same looking mold is GOOD kind, a shop selling to the public.

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/125619 ... -sausages/

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Like wise also here, does this blueygreen mold look like bad mold?

https://delizieitineranti.wordpress.com/2013/03/

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Post by LOUSANTELLO » Wed Mar 23, 2016 14:30

As long as we are on this conversation, I too am having a similar issue, but not green. All the soppressata I cured with a new chamber managed to grow white mold naturally. I dod not use or introduce any m-600. Now that I made 2 coppa, I decided to use M-600. After 2 weeks, I have little red spots growing. The majority is solid white right now, but what about the red?
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Post by Bob K » Wed Mar 23, 2016 14:46

Lou -
Is it growing or is it the red calabrian powder you rubbed on bleeding through? Pic would help.
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Post by LOUSANTELLO » Wed Mar 23, 2016 14:48

Maybe its leftover powder. I will post.
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Post by LOUSANTELLO » Wed Mar 23, 2016 14:56

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Post by Bob K » Wed Mar 23, 2016 15:08

That really looks like bleed through of the pepper powder. If you are running your chamber at less that 80% humidity I would bump it up to 82-85% for a week or so to give the white mold a better chance at rapid growth. It would then pretty much eliminate the chance of "bad" mold growth.
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Post by LOUSANTELLO » Wed Mar 23, 2016 15:16

I am sitting at 79% right now. I will keep an eye in the braseaola. That was put in 1 week later and has no red powder in the ingredients and so far no sign of any red spots. I totally forgot about the red powder
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Post by Fingers » Wed Mar 23, 2016 15:23

I'll start a new post to get some suggestions!?
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Post by LOUSANTELLO » Wed Mar 23, 2016 15:28

Sorry if I interrupted. Bob K, can you make some recommendations for Fingers original post?
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Post by Bob K » Wed Mar 23, 2016 16:16

Fingers-
TRy to wait for Redzed or Brican to reply as they have experience with letting molds grow other than white.
I would wipe off the green stuff myself as I am unsure if it will be good or bad. They have different thoughts.

No need to start a new thread.
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Post by harleykids » Wed Mar 23, 2016 18:14

Fingers,

I would also wait for Chris, etc to comment. I have only ever had the white mold, never any blue/green, etc so I can't comment. When it doubt, wipe it out (with distilled water, vinegar/salt solution..easy!)

Lou,

That's bleed thru of the pepper powder, paprika, etc. no worries. Happens to all the Salumi with anything red in them, pepperoni, etc. it's bleeding thru the holes you prick at the beginning for drying/air pockets. Leave it to dry as is.
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Post by Fingers » Wed Mar 23, 2016 18:43

Cheers

I've wiped the spots off the pancetta with red wine vinegar, then sprayed it with my mold culture made from a shop bought salami which has the good white stuff and worked on the salami.

OR I at least think is has worked (pic 1) to me this looks like the desired good mold we are all after?
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Post by harleykids » Wed Mar 23, 2016 18:52

yep, pic 1 looks good.

The nice thing is that the wiping seems to affect the bad molds much more than the good molds! Give the white mold even a bit of a fighting chance by wiping the bad molds away and chances are very good that the whit mold will colonize that area very quickly, and problem solved!
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Post by redzed » Thu Mar 24, 2016 08:08

Fingers, if anything, what really comes out of your experience is a clear case for using a proper mould starter to inoculate your sausages and the drying areas. Without a microscope and some knowledge, no one can identify conclusively the particular strain on the salami. Within the Penicillium group there are also strains that are green and grey and enhance the flavour of the fermented sausages. Similarly not all white moulds are desirable. So if you rely on wild moulds to grow on your salami you are risking growing mould toxins. The picture of the green mould covered products from the New York salumeria does not testify that all green mould is OK. Commercial producers regularly test the mould on their products and don't leave everything to nature. This is explained in the chapter on mould starters in Toldra's book:

To conclude, when the producers choose not to
use starters, it is necessary to identify the fungal
species occurring on the surface of the ripened product,
regardless of the good appearance and the high
sensory quality of the final product. Besides, the
control on the growth of the selected species and
their actual predominance over undesirable molds
should be periodically planned by routine laboratory
tests (i.e., isolation and identification of the species
applied in the industrial process) to avoid the unexpected
setting up of environment-contaminating
mold species, which are morphologically similar to
the selected ones.


We have already discussed here the discovery of the new subspecies Penicillium salamii, which is blue-green (turquoise?) and there are many hobbyists who don't concern themselves when their sausages turn that colour. And I have not yet heard of anyone getting sick from consuming such sausages. Nevertheless, there are risks and if you are not sure or uncomfortable with moulds other than white, I would wipe them off in the early stage, but toss if they had heavy growth. A good practice which helps in keeping unwanted moulds off the sausages is to wash them after stuffing and handling. And if you are using a stater, you can soak your casings in the mould solution which will give the desirable mould an early start in the battle with the nasty moulds.
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Post by Fingers » Thu Mar 24, 2016 08:27

I am seeing the sense in spraying the mould you want on but not been able to find a mould culture available for sale in the UK. So the only option to me is creating my own culture from the shop bought (lidl salami). The first pic is the results of this and as its came from a salami can only assume this is good to go with.
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