[USA] Bad Bob's Bologna

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Chuckwagon
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[USA] Bad Bob's Bologna

Post by Chuckwagon » Wed Mar 02, 2011 09:46

Shucks pards, all this talk about bologna the other day, had me scroungin' through ol' Patch's saddlebags lookin' for the ancient recipe I ripped off from Rytek Kutas back in the ol' days in Las Vegas, Nevada. Rytek ran a place called "The Hickory Shop" when I happened to stumble in. If you're not Swiss, you may wish to toss the coriander and mustard for a more "traditional" bologna recipe.

Bad Bob`s Bologna

4 lbs. pork butt
6 lbs. lean beef chuck
1 cup ice water
2 level tspns. Cure #1
1 tblspn. ground white pepper
2 tblspns. sweet Hungarian paprika
2 tspns. nutmeg
1/2 tspn. coriander
1/2 tspn. ground mustard
1 tspn. allspice
1 tspn. onion powder
1/3 cup non-iodized salt
2 cups protein concentrate
large cellulose casings (code: red)

Grind the nearly-frozen meat through a 3/16" plate. Stir the cure into the water and mix it into the meat, until the first signs of protein development begins. Add the remaining ingredients and emulsify the mixture in batches, in a food processor. Add a little more water to the mixture if the motor strains unnecessarily. Although the texture must become emulsified and sticky, be sure not to over-process the mixture. Stuff the mixture into beef bungs or cellulose casings, pin prick the casings to eliminate any air pockets, and then rinse them quickly to remove any sticky, drying, meat particles that develop with emulsified meat. Place the sausages into a refrigerator twenty-four hours.

Allow the bologna to hang at room temperature 90 minutes while the smokehouse is prepared and preheated to 130°;F. (54°;C.). Place the bologna into the smokehouse without smoke for half an hour. Wipe away all traces of moisture from the casings, and then start the smoke. After an hour, begin raising the temperature gradually only a few degrees every twenty minutes or so. When the smokehouse temperature reaches 165°;F. (74°;C.), discontinue the smoke but allow the sausage to continue cooking at that temperature until the internal meat temperature reaches 152°;F. (67°;C.). Immediately shower the bologna until the internal meat temperature drops to 100°;F. (43°;C.). Place bologna into a refrigerator or cooler at this point, until the internal meat temperature further drops to 50°;F. (10°;C.).

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
Last edited by Chuckwagon on Fri Aug 24, 2012 20:39, edited 1 time in total.
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by steelchef » Wed Mar 23, 2011 01:28

Jeez man! If you keep posting these delicious recipes I'm going to have to cancel my vacation and start sleeping less. My wife loves bologna so this one is a definite MUST DO!

Thanks.
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Post by Gray Goat » Wed Mar 23, 2011 03:48

Thanks for posting the recipe CW, it sounds like a winner. This one went right in the bookmarks :mrgreen:
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Post by Blackriver » Fri Aug 24, 2012 03:14

Thanks a lot for posting the recipe Chuckwagon! I am out of soy protein concentrate, and I only have some phosphates(meat binder Butcher and Packer sells). Could I substitute the phosphates for the soy protein concentrate? I plan on trying this recipe this weekend.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Fri Aug 24, 2012 06:25

Hi Blackriver, I`m glad you`re going to try this recipe. I still make it every now and then.
I can`t tell you about the phosphates because I`ve chosen not to use them. I`ve studied their composition and it is my opinion they should not be used in sausage. There was a very interesting debate that took place some time ago here: http://wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.ph ... light=#871

My fellow moderator "Siara" (in Poland), posted the following information about phosphates in sausage (Be sure to read the last two words of this review):
The review analyzes the results of recent studies on the biochemistry of high-molecular inorganic poly-phosphates (PolyPs). The data obtained lead to the following main conclusions. PolyPs are polyfunctional compounds. The main role of PolyPs is their participation in the regulation of metabolism both at the genetic and metabolic levels. Among the functions of PolyPs known at present, the most important are the following: phosphate and energy storage; regulation of the levels of ATP and other nucleotide and nucleoside-containing coenzymes; participation in the regulation of homeostasis and storage of inorganic cations and other positively charged solutes in an osmotically inert form; participation in membrane transport processes mediated by poly-β-Ca2+-hydroxybutyrate complexes; participation in the formation and functions of cell surface structures; control of gene activity; and regulation of activities of the enzymes and enzyme assemblies involved in the metabolism of nucleic acids and other acid biopolymers. However, the functions of PolyPs vary among organisms of different evolutionary levels. The metabolism and functions of PolyPs in each cellular compartment of procaryotes (cell wall, plasma membrane, cytosol) and eucaryotes (nuclei, vacuoles, mitochondria, plasma membrane, cell wall, mitochondria, cytosol) are unique. The synthesis and degradation of PolyPs in the organelles of eucaryotic cells are possibly mediated by different sets of enzymes. This is consistent with of the endosymbiotic hypothesis of eucaryotic cell origin. Some aspects of the biochemistry of high-molecular PolyPs are considered to be of great significance to the approach to biotechnological, ecological and medical problems.
Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Blackriver » Fri Aug 24, 2012 15:07

Thank you so much Chuckwagon! I am going to toss the phosphates and not use them in sausage. Is there something I could use for my binder I could find at my grocery store? I am making sausage on Saturday and I don't have time to order some more soy protein concentrate.
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Post by two_MN_kids » Fri Aug 24, 2012 17:46

Hey Chuckwagon and Siara,

Thanks for the information on phosphates. In the past six months I purchased two types; one for sausages and one for brine. The last time I made Bologna, I used a kit and premix. That supplier included a packet of "special meat binder". When the product was consumed, after being sliced and packaged, I noticed a good deal of moisture left behind. But the taste and texture of the final product was unlike any commercial Bologna I have ever tried.

I have all the required ingredients and casings to make this recipe, and will make some either with "Project B" or after. Doubtful I will ever use the phosphates again! :grin:

Just wondering...do I need to take the phosphates to the county Hazardous Waste Facility to dispose of it? :twisted:

Jim
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Post by Butterbean » Fri Aug 24, 2012 19:58

Blackriver wrote:Thank you so much Chuckwagon! I am going to toss the phosphates and not use them in sausage. Is there something I could use for my binder I could find at my grocery store? I am making sausage on Saturday and I don't have time to order some more soy protein concentrate.
I think powdered milk would work well. Or eggs.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Fri Aug 24, 2012 20:20

Powdered milk will do it although doctors would rather see you use soy protein on a continual basis for obvious reasons. Some commercial places use "dairy fine" powdered milk. If you have a big ol' dairy nearby, you may wish to purchase some. It's not available in grocery stores. If you can't find it, try some regular powdered milk but sharpen your food processor's knife blade and just powder the living daylights out of it. :roll:

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Butterbean » Sat Aug 25, 2012 01:31

Personally, I don't like the taste of soy protein concentrate and would rather use something else. I've just found my sausages tastes better - to me - if I make this substitution.
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sat Aug 25, 2012 07:06

Hey Butterbeano,
You're not the first one to say that. Others have mentioned the same thing. There are certainly limits. Over 6% soy protein addition and you're going to taste it!
I've always used the stuff and I really like it. And it binds water like crazy. Shucks, I even powder my face with it... so vital to a wrangler's complexion ya know! :roll:

Oh, by the way... our buddy 2MNkids wrote:
Just wondering...do I need to take the phosphates to the county Hazardous Waste Facility to dispose of it? Jim
I wonder if he knows you wear a Haz-Mat suit left over from your days on that "other site" and you now do house calls? :mrgreen:


Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Big Guy » Sat Aug 25, 2012 14:07

Thanks for the Bad Bob's balogna recipe. I'm going to make some when I go south. I bought a rig to make emulsions, and had it delivered to my Fl address (Momma doesn't like me to use her food processor) pics and stories to follow :lol:
Col. Big Guy
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Post by Butterbean » Sat Aug 25, 2012 14:24

Ah, yes. I still have my hazmat suit cause I still visit there occassionally when I feel the need to brush up on my math or get a good skeer but I can't venture there often else I'd be too skeered to cure meats. Of course I don't live to far from the CDC facility in Atlanta and I'm sure with budget constraints I might could work out a rental agreement for one of the rooms in Level 4.

Its puzzling to me that a site which is there to sell curing wares tends to spend so much time and effort to scare people away from curing meat. It just baffles me but I'm slow. Heck, I still can't keep this straight in my head but nites and ates are safe at any concentration as long as they are added to the meat in the form of sea salts and/or organic dehydrated celery juice since you don't actually add them but if using a refined curing salt in known quantities one must dawn the hazmat suit. Have I got that right? :roll:
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Post by NorCal Kid » Sat Aug 25, 2012 19:45

The recipe is very similar to the bologna batch I made last January. Some minor differences: garlic powder vs onion powder; and I used a combo of spc and nfdm vs all spc. I process the nfdm in a spice grinder until smooth & powdery, and a not of sweetener (dextrose). Instead of using a food processor, I ground the meat mixture 2x; the final time through a fine (3mm) plate.
Tasty results! :wink:

Bologna has been a bit hit in our household and it's something i encourage folks to try. home-made beats store-bought in every category: taste, texture, aroma, and cost. Plus you have the reward of blessing your loved ones with a REAL quality product in place of the store-bought pink mush-meat. :shock:

Kevin

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Post by Butterbean » Sat Aug 25, 2012 21:27

Very nice work.
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