[USA] "Polecat's Oui-Oui Water"

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crustyo44
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[USA] "Polecat's Oui-Oui Water"

Post by crustyo44 » Fri Feb 03, 2012 01:48

Hi,
I am looking for a marinade recipe that can be injected into pork shoulder.
Preferably a much loved family recipe. It can vary a lot as we all like garlic, chillies, plonk "oops wine" etc etc. The list is endless. I have several small injectors as well.
My idea was to roast some injected and marinated shoulder pieces this coming week-end as this cut of meat is on a special until sunday.
I probably stock up again as usual and cop a lot of flack as well. Ah well, that's married life.
Best Regards,
Jan.
Last edited by crustyo44 on Tue Mar 13, 2012 08:20, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by ssorllih » Fri Feb 03, 2012 01:59

Why not use a box chardonnay and add all of the spice and seasonings you want. perhaps heat it with all of the herbs in there and then strain it. Should work very well. roast it slowly.
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Chuckwagon
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Post by Chuckwagon » Fri Feb 03, 2012 02:59

Try this one Jan. You might be surprised.

[USA] Polecat`s Oui Oui Water
(Meat Injection Marinade)

1 cup fresh lemon juice
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 cup flat lager beer
2 tblspns. wochestershire sauce
1 tblspn. cider vinegar
1 tspn lemon zest (without pith)
4 cloves garlic (pulverized)
3/4 tspn. red pepper flakes
3/4 tspn freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 tspn. kosher salt
1/3 cup parsley
1/4 cup fresh basil

Place the lemon zest, garlic cloves, pepper flakes, black pepper, salt, parsley, and basil into a food processor and pulverize the mixture using short bursts. Add the lemon juice and process 15 seconds more or until it is smooth. Add the vinegar and beer and process a few seconds more. Finally, add the olive oil in a thin stream while processing, until the mixture is smooth and thickens just a bit. Just before baking or barbecuing, inject smaller amounts (sparingly) into a number of pork shoulders or beef chucks in several places. The mixture is strong and does not need to "inundate" the meat.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by partycook » Fri Feb 03, 2012 22:40

Hey CW,

I downloaded polecat's marinade sure looks interesting probably try it next week.

John
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Post by Chuckwagon » Sat Feb 04, 2012 01:32

Glad to hear it John. Here's a little secret that you might remember when using beer in sausage:

Beer In Sausage - What Type?

During fermentation, yeast produces alcohol, carbon dioxide, and sulfur compounds. All three elements contribute to unique flavors in food, just ask any bread-maker. But hold on! All three elements are naturally present together in another favorite location - a bottle of beer! So we can use beer in pancake batter, sourdough bread, and of course, our favorite home-made sausage right? Whoaaa pards! There a hitch in this giddyup!

In food, it's best to use the type of beer (Lager) which uses a process called "bottom fermentation" where the yeast is kept submerged in the low-oxygen environment at the bottom of the "wort" (grain mashed in hot water) at colder temperatures. This causes the yeast to produce fewer phenols and esters, allowing "breadier" yeast and sulfur flavors to become dominant.

In non-lager beers (Pilsner), a process called "top fermentation" is used, whereby yeast floats on top of the wort becoming exposed to oxygen and kept warm. What`s the problem? Oxygen and heat persuade yeast to produce spicy, astringent flavor compounds called "esters" that are desirable in beer... but not in food. And not in your best sausage recipe!

So pards, if you use beer in ol` grandpappy`s secret sausage recipe... (you know the one... "King Kong Kielbasa", the sausage recipe handed down from good ol` Uncle Paul and Cousin Peter in the old country... through generations of time), then read the label on the bottle and make sure you`re using a Lager beer.

Best Wishes,
Chuckwagon
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by Devo » Sat Feb 04, 2012 02:18

Well i'm good to go :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

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Post by crustyo44 » Sun Feb 05, 2012 23:48

Gentlemen,
Thank you for the suggestions. Be assured that both suggestions will be tried and maybe added to a bit.
Best Regards,
Jan.
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Post by el Ducko » Thu May 03, 2012 03:44

Chuckwagon wrote: In non-lager beers (Pilsner), a process called "top fermentation" is used
Hang on there, Pardner. :neutral: I home brew a bit, and use German lager yeast for my pils. You're thinking of ale yeast, which is a top fermenting yeast. (Many of the British beers use this type.)

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Post by NorCal Kid » Thu May 03, 2012 04:08

CW, good to know about the lagers & the use with food.

I've been 'using' this American-style lager, made from sorghum, since it is truly a gluten-free beer, and safe to both cook with and drink in our household. :grin:

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Post by el Ducko » Thu May 03, 2012 04:20

Another gluten free beer widely available in the US is Red Bridge. Seems like it is sorghum-based. It and Bard's aren't the best beers in the world, but if you are gluten sensitive... well, ya gotta do what ya gotta do. I keep some handy for "she who must be obeyed," which leaves more pilsner for me. ...all in all, very workable. :mrgreen:
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Post by Chuckwagon » Thu May 03, 2012 04:55

Hi Duck, where ya been? You shouldn't stray away too far from this hotbed of information!
You wrote:
Hang on there, Pardner. You're thinking of ale yeast, which is a top fermenting yeast.
I got the information from the food scientists at America's Test Kitchen in Boston.

P.S. I thought I was the only one with one of those, "She who must be obeyed". :roll:
If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably needs more time on the grill! :D
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Post by el Ducko » Thu May 03, 2012 16:06

Chuckwagon wrote:I got the information from the food scientists at America's Test Kitchen in Boston.
Yeah, I enjoy their shows, too, but take 'em with a grain of salt. They tend to have a New Englander's take on things (especially spicing, which Vermonter Chris Kimball doesn't like). ...and what they did to a so-called Texas-style barbequed brisket would make your blood boil. :razz:

...but they do have interesting ideas about what's important in order to hit targets like doneness, crispness, texture, et cetera. ...great show, but caveat emptor. :mrgreen:
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Post by w1sby » Thu May 03, 2012 22:40

Chuckwagon wrote: P.S. I thought I was the only one with one of those, "She who must be obeyed".
It is not a unique thing Chuck, only it is more properly "She Who Must Be Obeyed" caps and quotes required :lol:

I'll be doing a trial run with the marinade. I'm always up to trying something new!

73 de Allen, W1SBY
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Post by ssorllih » Fri May 04, 2012 02:48

My favorite fresh pork seasoning proceedure. Rub all over with 1.5 % by weight kosher salt and lots of freshly ground black pepper, place in a roasting pan and roast at 325°F for one hour per pound.
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Post by el Ducko » Fri May 04, 2012 04:23

Yeah, it's funny but the best dishes are often the simplest ones. That's what I do for brisket- - black pepper and a little salt, smoked low and slow.

My wife's first roast, she read in her cookbook that it should cook for half an hour per pound, so she cooked the four-pound piece of beef at four divided by 1/2 or eight hours. I praised her, of course. We sawed the poor thing open, scooped out the insides, and they were quite good. ...and nowadays, I do the cooking and the math. :mrgreen:
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