Recipe Chat

Gulyás
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Recipe Chat

Post by Gulyás » Tue Aug 13, 2013 19:22

Today I was thinking. (Yes I do that sometimes too.) :mrgreen:

If the yeast is killed at baking the bread, than what makes/starts the fermentation ?
Because it works with potatoes too.
One friend of mine told me, it ferments because of the proteins, part of amino acids.
Last edited by Gulyás on Tue Aug 20, 2013 03:54, edited 2 times in total.
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Igor Duńczyk
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Post by Igor Duńczyk » Tue Aug 13, 2013 22:30

Servusz Kedvés Gulyás ur :mrgreen:

You must think in reverse: The fermentation starts before the baking and it lasts until the yeast is killed because of the high temperature.

How do you mean potatoes? (Krumpli) Do you also ferment potatoes ??

Fermentation can take place when there is som kind of sugar (carbohydrates) present to feed the bacteria (or yeast).

Pure proteins alone are not fermentable, but usually the raw material which is to be fermented (milk, meat, vegetables, fruit etc.) contains a mix of both protein, sugars (carbohydrates) and water.

Your sózott uborka looks SO good on the pictures - I would really like to try them!

You say; "some people with stomach problems think it's medicine" - yes in a way it is like a medicine or a probiotic, because all the good lactic acid bacteria from the fermentation helps on your digestion.
Wishing you a Good Day!
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Post by Gulyás » Tue Aug 13, 2013 23:03

Yes Sir, (szervusz) Igor,

I was talking about the fermentation of cucumbers.
Sometimes I start them with bread, and sometimes I start them with potatoes.
With potatoes, it stays clearer, with bread its milky.
So far I was mistaken, because it is not the yeast that starts the fermentation, but the proteins.

You're right when it comes to baking bread.

So I do not ferment potatoes, I ferment cucumbers with the help of potatoes.

Looks like you speak (at least some of) the Hungarian language. :grin:

The pickles get sour, not salty. :wink:
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Post by Igor Duńczyk » Wed Aug 14, 2013 11:24

Servusz Gulyás

I have picked up a few words from my Hungarian (or rather Erdély) girlfriend. And I always liked hungarian culture. Visited Budapest first time in 1989 before the iron curtain fell - the hungarians being first as they cut down the border fence to Austria already in the spring thet year :mrgreen:
I am half polish myself...

Sorry - I totally misunderstood you on the fermentation question.
One reason being that, as far as I know, in Poland bread or potatoes are usually not included. Here is a translation of a typical polish recipe:
http://easteuropeanfood.about.com/od/po ... ickles.htm

The fermentation is caused by natural lactic bacteria which will be present in your surroundings.

By adding bread or potato you will gain some additional taste nuances (I guess :roll: ) but I doubt that it will add any bacteria.
How is the taste difference between bread- and potato fermented cucumbers ?

Do you ferment other vegetables too ?

Also: did you ever post a recipe for hungarian kolbasz? csabai, parasz, langolt or other kind?
I would love to see a "real" hungarian home recipe :grin:

Szija!
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Post by Gulyás » Thu Aug 15, 2013 04:14

Hello Igor,

Sorry for being late, I was gone all day.
There are many different ways to make dill pickles, mine is one of many.
It's name in Hungarian is kovászos uborka. Your girlfriend will know what it is..... :mrgreen:
I like the one fermented with bread a little better, because to me it tastes a little smoother. :wink:
I also ferment sauerkraut, much longer in lower temperature. Takes like 6 weeks or so.
I did post 2 recipes for sausages, 1 for fresh, the other for smoked/cured/dried, so called farmers, (paraszt-kolbász. :wink: )

To learn more about these dill pickles, you can read these too.

http://zsuzsaisinthekitchen.blogspot.co ... borka.html

http://www.chew.hu/kovaszos_uborka/

http://irandrus.wordpress.com/tag/kovaszos-uborka/

http://whilehewasout.wordpress.com/2012 ... os-uborka/

Have a nice whatever is coming up sir.

Ps.

One of my neighbors is also half Polish, he makes something similar, he calls it sun pickles.
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Post by Igor Duńczyk » Thu Aug 15, 2013 08:53

Gulyás wrote:I did post 2 recipes for sausages, 1 for fresh, the other for smoked/cured/dried, so called farmers, (paraszt-kolbász. )
Joo napot Gulyás Ur,

Could you possible re-post them ?
I´m a little lazy (or just in lack of time) to search for them :roll:

Köszi & Thanks´
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Post by Gulyás » Thu Aug 15, 2013 13:52

Hi Igor,

When you retire you'll have much more time....... :smile:

This is the link, and I think the smoked one is a little too salty for most people.
Many people don't like caraway seeds, they mostly add it to csabai (kolbász....sausage.)

http://www.wedlinydomowe.pl/en/viewtopic.php?t=5950

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Post by Gulyás » Thu Aug 15, 2013 15:20

Hey Igor,

Things change a lot in a lifetime.
When I was a kid, the 400 kg. pig (mangalica at that time) was the goal.
Today it's lean & mean.....

I have a picture somewhere about a 400 kilo pig, but I found this one on the net.

Image
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Post by Cabonaia » Thu Aug 15, 2013 23:41

Gulyas - that is some pig. So tell me, do you remember the meat from these big boys? Is a pig that large only good for lard and sausage, or do you still get good belly for bacon, roasts, chops and so on after you trim off all the fat for lard?

I am curious, as I have a couple mangalica crosses right now, and am scratching my chin on what weight to butcher them at. I want plenty of lard and backfat, but meat, too.

Best,
Jeff
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Post by Gulyás » Fri Aug 16, 2013 17:32

Hi Jeff,

You get plenty of meat, but it's not lean, but rather well marbled.
At that time the lard was very important, they had no other things like oils.
Because they had mostly only one pig, it had to last for a hole year.
After 10 months or so it started to get rancid.

Much depends on what the hog is fed, not only the kind. You'll get better quality if you feed it acorn, than kitchen scraps.

We had one about 400 kg., when they cut it open, the back fat was around 6", 150 mm. thick. Half was bacon, the other half went for lard.
It's very good tasting meat, I think because of the all the fat in it.

The small village I was born had no indoor pluming, electricity, paved road, or store, people lived off the land, they had what they produced.

Joe.
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Post by Cabonaia » Fri Aug 16, 2013 21:50

Thanks Joe. I think I'll grow these boys out a bit as I'm not interested in real lean pork. I wish I had some acorns, but they are just now appearing on the trees.

When I visited family in the Azores a few years back, they had plumbing, electricity and telephones, but they lived very simply and grew almost everything they ate. They still made their bread in stone ovens in a cook shack - I wonder how many still do that. My cousin had 3 cows and some small plots of land to provide his income. They went to the store only for coffee, sugar, things they couldn't make. For flour they took their own corn to a lady down the street who milled it in exchange for some flour. Everybody had a pig, which they made almost entirely into sausage. They stored the sausage in lard, as refrigeration used LP, and since LP one of their biggest cash expenses their fridges were tiny. They had cars but pretty much didn't drive them. They walked, or rode small motorcycles (sometimes whole families on one bike!) or donkeys. Their places were very well kept and they had a way of doing everything - lots of knowledge I wish I had. They didn't have much money, but they worked hard, ate well, and seemed to have more time for visiting than we do here!

Jeff
Thanks to me we have veered far off the topic of pickles. Maybe CW can help!
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Post by HamnCheese » Sat Aug 17, 2013 14:00

Hey Jeff,

We just picked up an entire whey fed pastured pig (Thanks, country cousins!) that weighed in at over 400 pounds live weight. The fatback is about two inches thick and the slabs are about 18" long.

The total order from the butcher was 296 pounds of meat, which included 60 one pound packages of ground.....which makes it so easy to just throw together some fresh sausage. (I'll look for the packing slip and will let you know the total amount of fat.)
Based on what we've tasted so far the meat is superior to any pork we've ever eaten.

Cousin is working on another pig for next year - although he swears he will not let it grow so large next time. (Apparently pig was not ready to leave the pasture and caused a bit of a tussle.)

Lynn
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Post by redzed » Mon Aug 19, 2013 05:58

Lynn, you are indeed fortunate. I sure wish I had access to meat like that! The sausages that I would make!
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Post by Cabonaia » Tue Aug 20, 2013 01:11

HamnCheese wrote:Hey Jeff,

We just picked up an entire whey fed pastured pig (Thanks, country cousins!) that weighed in at over 400 pounds live weight. The fatback is about two inches thick and the slabs are about 18" long.

The total order from the butcher was 296 pounds of meat, which included 60 one pound packages of ground.....which makes it so easy to just throw together some fresh sausage. (I'll look for the packing slip and will let you know the total amount of fat.)
Based on what we've tasted so far the meat is superior to any pork we've ever eaten.

Cousin is working on another pig for next year - although he swears he will not let it grow so large next time. (Apparently pig was not ready to leave the pasture and caused a bit of a tussle.)

Lynn
Lynn - Thanks for this note. It sounds like you are pretty happy with your pig, and from the sound of it I would be too! Apparently, as a sausage maker, I don't need to worry about harvesting them on the plump side.

Jeff
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Post by ssorllih » Tue Aug 20, 2013 01:43

We raised pigs when I was a kid and "fat as a pig", "eats like a pig", "big as a hog" were real examples for non farm people. Now I read questions like, " Am I feeding my pig too much"? "how big should my pig be when I butcher it?" pig fat is good!
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