Venison Liver Sausage

fatboyz
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Post by fatboyz » Sat Dec 09, 2017 23:57

Bob Chris might jump in. These swiss and german guys all use "pink salt" it's a combination of regular salt and cure #1 and dyed pink so you don't get them mixed up. I think it's like Mortons quick cure which is salt and cure combined.
Again from Mr Google|:
Definition
Pink salt is a common name for a mixture of sodium chloride, or table salt, and sodium nitrite. It is also called InstaCure, Prague Powder, and "Pökelsalz" in German. It is used on meat so that the botulinum toxin cannot be produced. Pink salt is toxic to humans but is not present in finished, cured meats in a high enough dose to cause illness or death.

Pink salt is dyed pink in color so it cannot be confused with table salt.


The nitrite imparts characteristic color and flavor to cured meats.


Pink Salt's Two Main Forms: Cure #1 and Cure #2.
Cure #1 type of pink salt is used in to cure all meats that require cooking, brining, smoking, or canning. This includes poultry, fish, ham, bacon, luncheon meats, corned beef, pates and other products. It consists of 93.75% table salt and 6.25% sodium nitrite.


and is used at a rate of 1 teaspoon per 5 pounds of ground meat.


If using it for a brine, use 1/2 cup InstaCure No. 1 per gallon of water, plus 1 3/4 cup table salt, 2 1/4 tablespoon sugar and any spices you wish.

Cure #2 is formulated for dry cured products such as pepperoni, hard salami, prosciutti hams, dried sausages and other products which do not require cooking, smoking or refrigeration. One level teaspoon (from a mix of 1 ounce sodium nitrite (6.25%), 0.64 ounces sodium nitrate (4%) to 1 pound of salt) is used per 5 pounds of meat.

The cures are not interchangeable so follow the recipe you use closely and use a recipe from a reliable source.

Do not use pink salt like regular table salt. Do not sprinkle it on your food.

Also Known As: Prague Powder, InstaCure, Pökelsalz, Cure #1 and Cure #2

I'm not sure if this is the same stuff. If it's Prague you sure wouldn't use 17g/kg. I'll check with him on what it is? I know I substitute it with the normal 15g/kg of reg salt and 2.5g/kg of cure salt.
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Post by fatboyz » Sun Dec 10, 2017 02:08

The pink salt they use is very similar to Mortons tender quick. Here is a copy and Paste from the Mortons site. They use 1T/pound of meatso that would be similar to the 17g/kg the German guys use in sausage:
Curing Small Cuts of Meat in the Kitchen
It can be used to cure pork chops, pork ribs, chicken and other small cuts of meat by using 1
tablespoon of Tender Quick per pound of meat. Rub the cure mix into the meat or chicken
thoroughly. Place it in a sealed plastic bag and refrigerate for 4-8 hours. Rinse the meat well in
cold, running water just before cooking...which would mean smoking or barbecuing for our
intents and purposes.
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Bob K
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Post by Bob K » Sun Dec 10, 2017 18:41

fatboyz wrote:I'm not sure if this is the same stuff. If it's Prague you sure wouldn't use 17g/kg. I'll check with him on what it is?
That's the only way you will find out what they actually use, "pink salt" as you now know comes in many formulations.

FYI Tender Quick contains both nitrate and nitrite
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Post by redzed » Wed Dec 13, 2017 04:55

fatboyz wrote:These swiss and german guys all use "pink salt" it's a combination of regular salt and cure #1 and dyed pink so you don't get them mixed up. I think it's like Mortons quick cure which is salt and cure combined.


I am baffled as to why someone in Canada would use "pink salt". Canadian curing salt formulations are the same as the American ones but they are not dyed pink. So why would one go to to the added expense and trouble to import pink salt?

Pökelsalz is a European curing salt and should not be compared to the North American Cure#1 and Cure #2. European curing salts contain only .5 or .6% of nitrite which is essentially one tenth of the amount in CUre #1. If you substituted the same amount of Cure #1 for Pökelsalz, you could get very sick.

As Bob pointed out, Mortons also contains potassium nitrate, which are not found in any of the European cures. Take look here:
https://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausag ... g/nitrates
And here:
https://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausage-making/curing
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Post by redzed » Wed Dec 13, 2017 07:55

Image

Image

I was recently visiting family in Saskatchewan. While there, my brother-in-law and two nephews each bagged a nice white whitetail buck. And a few days before my arrival, one of the nephews also brought home a couple of mule deer does. So I was fortunate enough to come home with a suitcase of venison. I also took one liver to make a traditional European style liver sausage. The process I used was adapted from the Polish language Wedliny Domowe site. https://wedlinydomowe.pl/wedliny-podrob ... ieprzowiny

The Polish recipe called for 33% liver content but since my liver was from a mature buck, I did not want it to dominate the taste, so i reduced it to 25%, and am glad that I did. I also used side pork (pork belly) instead of jowl. Overall, I am very please with the result, it has a classic liver sausage flavour and is wonderful with a piece of rye bread and a sour pickle. It's spreadable at room temperature.

I used a bowl chopper to emulsify the meat batter, but you could also grind everything three times with the 2 or 3mm plate. The amount of stock you add will determine how soft and spreadable the sausage will be.

Deer Liver Sausage

Meats

Deer liver, 1kg
Deer meat trimmings (with connective tissue, no fat) 1kg
Side pork, 1g
Pork trimmings, about 40% fat, 500g
Back fat, 500g

Ingredients (per 1kg of meat block)
Salt, 20g
Cure# 1, .5g (added for colour only)
White pepper, finely ground, 3g
Marjoram, 1.5g
All spice, 1g
Nutmeg, 1g
Ginger, .5g
Onion, 100g
Meat stock, 30-60ml

Instructions
1. Soak liver overnight in cold water. Wash all meats prior to cooking.
2. Cook the deer meat and pork trimmings at a temp of 95C, just under boiling point. Save the broth.
3. Cook the side pork for and back fat at 95C until soft, about 10 minutes
4. Trim the cartilage off the liver and remove any coagulated blood. Cut into two inch strips and poach for a two minutes in 95C water, drain and rinse with cold water.
5. Chop onion and saute in lard until translucent.
6. Allow the meats to cool, cut into 1-2 inch pieces, add the fried onion and grind through the 2 or 3mm plate.
7. Emulsify adding the spices and broth until you reach the desired consistency.
8. Stuff into 45-50mm beef middles.
9. Cook in water at 80° C (176° F) for 45 minutes. (General rule is 10 minutes cooking time for each 10mm of casing diameter.) Cool with water for 10 minutes.
10. Allow to cool to 18C
11. Cold smoke with alder at 18° until the sausages develop a golden yellow colour.

Image

Image
Last edited by redzed on Mon Dec 25, 2017 17:23, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Bob K » Thu Dec 14, 2017 16:52

That looks great Chris! I prefer the emulsified version hands down over the ground. I think the fat content has a lot to do with how spreadable it is.

These work great for liverwurst https://www.butcherspantry.com/natural- ... ducts-1-ea
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Post by redzed » Thu Dec 14, 2017 17:34

Bob K wrote:That looks great Chris! I prefer the emulsified version hands down over the ground. I think the fat content has a lot to do with how spreadable it is.
Yes, emulsifying created a better one whole mass and improves spreadability. And working with a cooked product is a lot easier than with cold fat and meats where you really have to watch the temperature of the meat batter. Fat does affect the spreadability and texture, but by adjusting the broth amount you can also make a leaner product that is spreadable.

I almost was going to grind everything a couple more times because it is such a messy and time consuming job to throughly clean my bowl chopper, but then I thought, "what the hell did I buy it for?". In the end I am glad I used it. :grin:
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Post by Bob K » Thu Dec 14, 2017 18:17

I also noticed pig skins on the Polish site. That probably contributes to the spreadability. I have been using .9% dry gelatin to the recipe.
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Post by redzed » Thu Dec 14, 2017 18:41

Geez Bob you got sharp eyes! My formulation actually has a small amount of pork skin (cooked until soft with the meats). It came from the piece of pork belly. I have more skins in the freezer but decided not to use them because they are now 10 months old. Not sure whether it improves spreadabilty, but in emulsified sausages like weisswurst skins give it a lighter, fluffier mouthfeel.
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Post by jjnurk » Fri Mar 09, 2018 14:40

redzed wrote:
Deer liver, 1kg
Deer meat trimmings (with connective tissue, no fat) 1kg
Side pork, 1g
Pork trimmings, about 40% fat, 500g
Back fat, 500g

Ingredients (per 1kg of meat block)
Salt, 20g
Cure# 1, .5g (added for colour only)
White pepper, finely ground, 3g
Marjoram, 1.5g
All spice, 1g
Nutmeg, 1g
Ginger, .5g
Onion, 100g
Meat stock, 30-60ml
I got a request to make, or try to make, some liver sausage/pate. Once again, being I've never done anything like this, I've seen your recipe and the pictures of your final product and it looks quite appetizing. Would i replace the venison liver with pork and follow the same procedure? I must say, I'm not a big fan of the taste of liver, however the store bought pate is quite tasty and that's the flavour I would like to duplicate. thx,
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Post by Butterbean » Fri Mar 09, 2018 16:04

That looks good. How was the flavor of the venison liver?
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Post by Kijek » Fri Mar 09, 2018 16:24

a classic liver sausage flavour and is wonderful with a piece of rye bread and a sour pickle
I most say that sounds so good, I think maybe I'll move up your guys way, both for that great hunting and your liver sausage. :lol:
But seriously, what a beautiful 8 point buck, and the sausage look delicious, and I too have started to save my pork skins just for that purpose of adding to some sausages.
I forget who posted that about the skin, but I'm glad he did.
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Post by jjnurk » Fri Mar 09, 2018 17:06

redzed wrote:Any reference to "bratwurst" is quite overarching, covering so many different types of sausage. Any fresh sausage can essentially now be called bratwurst. If you want to make something close to an original, don't look at recipes for Johnsonville brats, but for specific regional German wursts. My next one will be a Bavarian Stockwurst, which is essentially the same as a Munich Weisswurst, except it contains beef rather than veal. Start with the German recipes in Marianski's collection, and don't be tempted by the Americanized Heinz 57 versions, that include every spice on the shelf.

A couple of tips: Add about 5-8% pork skins, boiled, chilled and ground through the 3mm plate. The wurst will have a softer, fluffier texture and a nice mouthfeel. For lemon zest you can easily substitute a few drops of lemon extract. And it's worth to spend the money and use mace rather than nutmeg.

Have fun experimenting this weekend and let us know the results. Wishing you the best of the wurst! (Sorry, but I could not help it :lol: :oops: )
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Post by Bob K » Fri Mar 09, 2018 17:30

Comment was made referring to the original Liver Sausage recipe from the Polish site



Wątrobianka grodziska z dzika i sarny z dodatkiem wieprzowiny
środa, 27 sierpnia 2014 Administrator
Drukuj


A. Surowiec

DSC00011

1. Mięso z kości (dzik, sarna) - 3 kg

2. Wątroba wp.+ z dzika i sarny - 3 kg

3. Podgardle wp. - 3 kg

4. Skórki wp. 70 dkg


5. Opcjonalnie rosół z gotowania mięs zależnie od tego czy ma być bardziej lub mniej smarowna

Surowiec nie solony i nie peklowany.



B. Przyprawy i materiały pomocnicze

I. Przyprawy

1. Sól - 17 g/kg

2. Pieprz - 0,5 g/kg

3. Majeranek - 1,5 g/kg

4. Cebula suszona - 3 g/kg

Cebulę suszoną można zastąpić cebulą świeżą w stosunku 0,15 kg suszu-1 kg cebuli świeżej. Cebulę świeżą kroimy w piórka i obsmażamy.
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redzed
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Post by redzed » Sat Mar 10, 2018 07:12

jjnurk wrote:I got a request to make, or try to make, some liver sausage/pate. Once again, being I've never done anything like this, I've seen your recipe and the pictures of your final product and it looks quite appetizing. Would i replace the venison liver with pork and follow the same procedure? I must say, I'm not a big fan of the taste of liver, however the store bought pate is quite tasty and that's the flavour I would like to duplicate. thx,
Pork liver will certainly work well and will have a milder liver flavour than if you used venison or beef livers. I really like a good liver sausage every now and then, but it's not something that I want to eat every day. And I don't go over 25% liver content, but you will see recipes with a lot more. The Polish recipe that Bob posted has 33% and some German braunschweigers as much as 50%. It all comes down to personal tastes and you may have to tweak a few formulations before you find one that you like.
Butterbean wrote: How was the flavor of the venison liver?

The flavour was very good, but definitely stronger than pork liver and I'm glad I did not go over 25%. The liver was very healthy and very fresh. I froze it within one hour of being butchered. Still have almost half of it in the freezer and will use it when I make "kaszanka" a Polish blood sausage.
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